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Health Benefits of Mediterranean Diet

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ISBN: 9783039214938 / 9783039214945 Year: Pages: 274 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-494-5 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Social Sciences --- Sociology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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Abstract

Growing evidence shows that a dietary pattern inspired by Mediterranean dietprinciples is associated with numerous health benefits. A Mediterranean-typediet has been demonstrated to exert a preventive effect toward cardiovasculardiseases, in both Mediterranean and non-Mediterranean populations. Part ofthese properties may depend on a positive action toward healthier metabolism,decreasing the risk of diabetes and metabolic-syndrome-related conditions.Some studies also suggested a potential role in preventing certain cancers. Finally,newer research has showed that a higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet isassociated with a lower risk of cognitive decline, depression, and other mentaldisorders. Overall, a better understanding of the key elements of this dietarypattern, the underlying mechanisms, and targets, are needed to corroboratecurrent evidence and provide insights on new and potential outcomes.ThisSpecial Issue welcomes original research and reviews of literature concerningthe Mediterranean diet and various health outcomes:Observational studies onestablished nutritional cohorts (preferred), case-control studies, or populationsample on the association with non-communicable diseases;Level of evidenceon the association with human health, including systematic reviews and metaanalyses;Evaluation of application of Mediterranean diet principles in non-Mediterranean countries;Description of mechanisms of action, pathways, andtargets at the molecular level, including interaction with gut microbiota.

Keywords

Mediterranean diet --- dietary intervention --- diet --- nutrition --- translation --- non-alcoholic fatty liver disease --- cardiovascular disease --- Mediterranean diet --- physical activity --- self-concept --- socioeconomic factors --- Mediterranean diet --- diabetes --- cardiovascular risk --- glucose control --- plasma lipids --- relative Mediterranean diet score --- Mediterranean diet --- questionnaire --- children --- adolescents --- obesity --- Mediterranean diet --- athletes --- Spain --- dietary intake --- catechins --- resveratrol --- olive oil --- wine --- BMI --- Mediterranean diet --- barriers --- dietary change --- childbearing age --- diet quality --- depressive symptoms --- risk factors --- epidemiology --- immune system --- prevention --- hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal-HPA axis --- Mediterranean diet --- motivational climate --- sports --- university students --- Mediterranean diet --- metabolomics --- microbiome --- Mediterranean diet --- DNA damage --- DNA repair --- telomere length --- dietary intervention study --- Mediterranean diet --- sleep quality --- cognitive decline --- dementia --- weight status --- mental health --- obesity --- cohort --- Italy --- Mediterranean diet --- quality of life --- mental health --- fruit --- vegetable --- dairy --- nuts --- fish --- whole-grain --- food groups --- Mediterranean diet --- pregnancy --- offspring --- child health --- Mediterranean diet --- Mediterranean diet pyramid --- noncommunicable diseases --- Mediterranean Diet --- public health policy --- childhood obesity --- healthy lifestyle --- health communication --- n/a

Long-Term Health Effects of the 9/11 Disaster

Authors: --- ---
ISBN: 9783039218127 / 9783039218134 Year: Pages: 298 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-813-4 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Philosophy
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:16
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Abstract

The terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center towers on September 11, 2001, also referred as 9/11, was an iconic event in US history that altered the global and political response to terrorism. The attacks, which involved two planes hitting the twin towers in Lower Manhattan, New York City, resulted in the collapse of the buildings and over 2800 deaths of occupants of the buildings, fire, police and other responders and persons on the street in the vicinity of the collapsing buildings. The destroyed towers and the surrounding buildings have since been replaced but the health effects that resulted from the release of tons of dust, gases and debris as well as the life threat trauma are ongoing, and represent a major health burden among persons directly exposed. Hundreds of scientific publications have documented the physical and mental health effects attributed to the disaster. The current state-of-the-art in understanding the ongoing interactions of physical and mental health, especially PTSD, and the unique mechanisms by which pollutants from the building collapse, have resulted in long term pulmonary dysfunction, course of previously reported conditions, potential emerging conditions (e.g., heart disease and autoimmune diseases), as well as quality of life, functioning and unmet health care needs would be in the purview of this Special Issue on the 9/11 Disaster.

Keywords

counseling --- post-disaster --- psychotherapy --- mental health treatment --- treatment utilization --- World Trade Center --- indoor allergens sensitization --- asthma quality of life --- asthma control --- asthma outcomes --- mini asthma quality of life questionnaire --- asthma morbidity --- WTC-related asthma --- immunoglobulin E --- allergen exposure --- WTC attack --- respiratory symptoms --- lower Manhattan residents --- cleaning practices --- WTC --- fibrotic sarcoid --- injury --- inflammation --- fibrosis --- World Trade Center disaster --- pulmonary fibrosis --- dust --- injury --- physical health --- mental health --- World Trade Center disaster --- Short Form-12 (SF-12) --- HQoL --- 9/11 --- 9/11 disaster --- handgrip strength --- WTC responders --- PTSD --- depression --- aging --- 9/11 impact --- retirement --- chronic disease --- PTSD --- disaster --- income loss --- PTSD symptom change --- PCL score --- longitudinal analysis --- PTSD cluster --- WTC survivors --- 9/11 disaster --- obstructive sleep apnea --- comorbid insomnia --- sleep-related quality of life --- chronic sinusitis --- sleepiness --- WTC responders --- thyroid cancer --- 9/11 disaster --- World Trade Center --- surveillance bias --- sarcoidosis --- World Trade Center (WTC) --- Scadding stage --- lung function --- severe lung disease --- extrathoracic sarcoidosis --- cardiac sarcoidosis --- unmet mental health care needs --- Asian Americans --- World Trade Center attack --- disaster --- mental health conditions --- mental health service use --- health insurance --- social support --- stressful life events --- cognitive reserve --- cognitive decline --- latent class analysis --- disaster epidemiology --- PTSD --- airway physiology --- dust --- environmental health --- forced oscillation --- respiratory function --- small airway disease --- paresthesia --- neuropathic symptoms --- Cox regression --- hazard function --- World Trade Center exposure --- metabolic syndrome --- airway hyperreactivity --- World Trade Center --- disaster mental health --- evidence-based treatment --- mental health service utilization --- quality improvement --- 9/11 --- screening --- thyroid cancer --- biomarkers --- medical imaging --- pulmonary function tests --- lung injury --- occupational exposure --- epidemiological studies --- peripheral neuropathy --- prevalence --- World Trade Center --- rescue/recovery workers --- occupational exposure --- sarcoidosis --- World Trade Center --- 9/11 --- genetics --- firefighters --- FDNY --- 9/11 disaster --- asthma --- trigger(s) --- air pollution --- irritant(s) --- health-related quality of life --- n/a

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eng (2)


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2019 (2)