Search results: Found 5

Listing 1 - 5 of 5
Sort by
Sleep and cognition in the elderly

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889192953 Year: Pages: 78 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-295-3 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-10 11:59:07
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Understanding the role of sleep and the mechanisms at play in ageing are among the most exciting challenges in neuroscience. Although our understanding of the mechanisms governing sleep stages and their role in cognitive processes including memory functions is gradually increasing. most of the currently available data have been gathered in young adults. Still, substantial physiological changes in sleep are observed with increasing age, that may markedly impacts on daily functioning. This is why this Research Topic focuses on our current understanding of the impact of age-related changes in sleep architecture on various domains of cognition. The three editors Julie Carrier (Montréal, Canada), Philippe Peigneux (Brussels, Belgium) and Géraldine Rauchs (Caen, France) are specialized in various fields of sleep research. Here, they bring together an outstanding group of neuroscientist and clinical investigators engaged in the study of sleep, encompassing state-of-the-art studies of sleep disorders such as sleep apnoea or REM sleep behaviour disorder, studies assessing new treatments to improve sleep quality, together with experts in various domains of cognition such as vigilance, memory and dreams, in a perspective aimed at offering the interested reader a comprehensive view of the impact of age-related changes in sleep architecture on cognition.

Traumdramaturgie und Selbstreflexion: Bildstrategien romantischer Traumdarstellungen im Spannungsfeld zeitgenössischer Traumtheorie und Ästhetik

Author:
ISBN: 9783946198000 9783946198031 9783946198017 9783946198024 Year: Pages: 326 DOI: 10.16994/bab Language: German
Publisher: Modern Academic Publishing
Subject: Philosophy --- Social Sciences --- History of arts --- Arts in general
Added to DOAB on : 2016-05-19 11:01:04
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The dissertation analyses dream images in romanticist art, with regards to inherent dreamanalogue strategies in consideration of contemporary dream theory and aesthetics, with a focus on the period between 1820 and 1840. The study does not provide a typological, iconographical or motif-historical collection of samples, but analyses different aspects of selected artworks which represent a wide range in terms of their contextual, formal and topographical heterogeneity, and overcomes the existing stereotypical classification in the context of romanticist art reflection. The study identifies that, beyond the contextual-iconographical dimension, the dream serves as an aesthetical category because it is reflected not only as a motif but also in relation to its dramaturgy. In the romantic awareness of the difficulty of an adequate representation of invisible images, the nonlinear, associative, ciphered, space- and time-simultaneous structure of the dream is adapted as a method, and is staged by varied and differentiated configurations. This is mirrored by comprehensive or formal concepts (genre, technique, media and interdisciplinary), as well as in fragmentary structures (sketches and drawings), in materiality (transparency and colour) or arabesque and combinatory production principles.
The study contains three chapters: after a general introduction to the subject, the analysis of the current state of research and the demonstration of the methodology in the first chapter, the second chapter focuses on contemporary dream discourses (especially the theories of Gotthilf Heinrich Schubert and Carl Gustav Carus) and the constitutive role of the philosophy of Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling. By also involving the literary concepts of dreams the romantic awareness of the deficiency of the visible image compared to the invisible, which forces an avoidance of a mimetic art perception, becomes obvious. The third chapter forms the main body of the study. On the basis of selected dream images it analyses the different artistic strategies and conditions of reception.
The first section of the third chapter focuses on artist dream imagery, namely the Musician’s Dream by Caspar David Friedrich, Raphael’s Dream by Franz and Johannes Riepenhausen and the Dream of Erwin von Steinbach by Moritz von Schwind. The analysis indicates that the dreaming artist serves as mise-en-abyme of the dream-analogue productive and reflexive process, and the artwork itself.
The second section of chapter three makes landscape spaces accessible as imaginative concepts and projections of emotional states, according to current literature studies. Landscape spaces serve as patterns for reflection processes, which is explored on the basis of The Dreamer by Caspar David Friedrich.
The third section of the third chapter focuses on a combinatory and arabesque concept as a dream-analogue and self-reflexive strategy – the collage-like compilation, association and transformation of heterogeneous elements which are analysed on the basis of the artworks Dream of Adam by Moritz von Schwind and The Evening by Clemens Brentano.

What We Are When We Are: Kaj smo, ko smo

Author:
Book Series: Mingling Voices ISSN: 1917-9405; 1917-9413 ISBN: 9781771992497; 9781771992503; 9781771992510 Year: Pages: 102 DOI: 10.15215/aupress/9781771992497.01 Language: English; Slovenian
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-22 22:21:42
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Working within a postmodern style, this rhythmic and melodious collection of poems originally written in Slovenian by Cvetka Lipuš and translated here by Tom Priestly, blends the real with the surreal, dull urban lives with dreams. Lipuš, known for the lexical beauty of her work, dwells on topics of time and space which she handles in an almost revolving, irreverent manner. Priestly captures the maze-like characteristic of her verse and carefully reconstructs the sonoric beauty of the work in its original language.

Higher Education and the American Dream

Author:
ISBN: 9789639776791 9786155211911 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Central European University Press
Subject: Education
Added to DOAB on : 2015-05-19 15:18:48
License: OpenEdition licence for Books

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

""Marvin Lazerson’s new book is exactly what is needed: a readable, cogent explanation of how the U.S. can have the best system of higher education in the world, but also a system that seems to be coming apart at the seams.” —Susan Fuhrman, President Teachers College, Columbia University, President of the National Academy of Education ""In prose remarkable for its clarity and analysis remarkable for its fair-mindedness, this volume delivers a penetrating, nuanced account of American universit...

Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture

Author:
Book Series: Manchester Medieval Literature and Culture ISBN: 9781526115997 Year: Pages: 248 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_631090 Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press Grant: University Of Manchester
Subject: Languages and Literatures --- Arts in general
Added to DOAB on : 2017-06-24 11:02:00
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

"Anglo-Saxon ‘things’ could talk. Nonhuman voices leap out from the Exeter Book Riddles, telling us how they were made or how they behave. The Franks Casket is a box of bone that alludes to its former fate as a whale that swam aground onto the shingle, and the Ruthwell monument is a stone column that speaks as if it were living wood, or a wounded body. In this book, James Paz uncovers the voice and agency that these nonhuman things have across Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture. He makes a new contribution to ‘thing theory’ and rethinks conventional divisions between animate human subjects and inanimate nonhuman objects in the early Middle Ages. Anglo-Saxon writers and craftsmen describe artefacts and animals through riddling forms or enigmatic language, balancing an attempt to speak and listen to things with an understanding that these nonhumans often elude, defy and withdraw from us. But the active role that things have in the early medieval world is also linked to the Germanic origins of the word, where a þing is a kind of assembly, with the ability to draw together other elements, creating assemblages in which human and nonhuman forces combine. 

Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture invites us to rethink the concept of voice as a quality that is not simply imposed upon nonhumans but which inheres in their ways of existing and being in the world. It asks us to rethink the concept of agency as arising from within groupings of diverse elements, rather than always emerging from human actors alone."

Listing 1 - 5 of 5
Sort by