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Green Carbon

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ISBN: 9781921313882 Year: Pages: 47 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_459256 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: Forestry --- Environmental Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2012-06-14 11:46:24
License: ANU Press

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The colour of carbon matters. Green carbon is the carbon stored in the plants and soil of natural ecosystems and is a vital part of the global carbon cycle. This report is the first in a series that examines the role of natural forests in the storage of carbon, the impacts of human land use activities, and the implications for climate change policy nationally and internationally. REDD (“reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation”) is now part of the agenda for the “Bali Action Plan” being debated in the lead-up to the Copenhagen climate change conference in 2009. Currently, international rules are blind to the colour of carbon so that the green carbon in natural forests is not recognised, resulting in perverse outcomes including ongoing deforestation and forest degradation, and the conversion of extensive areas of land to industrial plantations. This report examines REDD policy from a green carbon scientific perspective. Subsequent reports will focus on issues concerning the carbon sequestration potential of commercially logged natural forests, methods for monitoring REDD, and the long term implications of forest policy and management for the global carbon cycle and climate change.

Green Carbon Part 2.

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
ISBN: 9781921666711 Year: Pages: 124 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_459257 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: Forestry --- Environmental Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2012-06-14 11:46:24
License: ANU Press

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This report is the second in a series that examines the role of natural forests and woodlands in the storage of carbon. Understanding the role of natural ecosystems in carbon storage is an important part of solving the climate change problem. This report presents a landscape-wide green carbon account of the ‘Great Western Woodlands’ (GWW), sixteen million hectares of mostly contiguous natural woody vegetation to the east of the wheatbelt in south-western Western Australia. For the first time, we provide an overview of the vegetation structure, climate, geology and historical land use of the GWW, and examine how these interact to affect the carbon dynamics of this region’s landscape ecosystems. An analysis of time-series of satellite imagery is used to develop a fire history of the GWW since the 1970s. These layers of environmental information, along with field survey data and remotely sensed greenness, are used to construct a spatial model to estimate biomass carbon stocks of the woodlands at the present day, and to infer an upper limit to the carbon sequestration potential of the GWW. A range of management options to enable protection of high quality carbon stocks and restoration of degraded stocks are evaluated.

Building a Sustainable and Desirable Economy-in-Society-in-Nature

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: - ISBN: 9781921862045 9781921862052 Year: Volume: - Pages: - DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_462196 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: Agriculture (General) --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2014-01-13 12:33:43
License: ANU Press

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The world has changed dramatically. We no longer live in a world relatively empty of humans and their artifacts. We now live in the “Anthropocene,” era in a full world where humans are dramatically altering our ecological life-support system. Our traditional economic concepts and models were developed in an empty world. If we are to create sustainable prosperity, if we seek “improved human well-being and social equity, while significantly reducing environmental risks and ecological scarcities,” we are going to need a new vision of the economy and its relationship to the rest of the world that is better adapted to the new conditions we face. We are going to need an economics that respects planetary boundaries, that recognizes the dependence of human well-being on social relations and fairness, and that recognizes that the ultimate goal is real, sustainable human well-being, not merely growth of material consumption. This new economics recognizes that the economy is embedded in a society and culture that are themselves embedded in an ecological life-support system, and that the economy cannot grow forever on this finite planet. In this report, we discuss the need to focus more directly on the goal of sustainable human well-being rather than merely GDP growth. This includes protecting and restoring nature, achieving social and intergenerational fairness (including poverty alleviation), stabilizing population, and recognizing the significant nonmarket contributions to human well-being from natural and social capital. To do this, we need to develop better measures of progress that go well beyond GDP and begin to measure human well-being and its sustainability more directly.

Rare Earth and Actinide Complexes

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783038423294 9783038423287 Year: Pages: X, 254 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Organic Chemistry
Added to DOAB on : 2017-02-20 08:39:06
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As the fields of organometallic and coordination chemistry of the transition metals has grown more mature, the under-explored chemistry of the rare-earths and actinides has drawn the attention of research groups from across the globe looking for new fundamental discoveries and access to compounds with unique properties. The rare-earths—the group 3 metals and the 4f lanthanide series—have long shown many interesting properties in the solid state which exploit their unique electronic configurations. However, it is the molecular chemistry of these metals that has expanded dramatically in recent years as researchers identify the differences between—and unique features of—their molecular compounds. Recent highlights include the identification of new oxidation states and patterns of reactivity as well as applications in medical imaging and health care which represent new and exciting areas of research. The actinides show a wide range of different properties as a consequence of their radioactivity and radiochemistry, but this has not stopped recent rapid progress into the exploration of their unique chemistry. Uranium, in particular, shows huge potential with its transition metal-like range of oxidation states (+2 to +6), and in specialised laboratories, the heavier actinides are also beginning to show their unique chemistry. This Special Issue aims to bring together these strands of research in an openly-accessible way to allow better communication of these advances to a wider audience. This is necessary as, despite these exciting advances, the rare-earths and actinides are still much neglected topics in both school and undergraduate curriculums. Contributions in the above-mentioned areas will allow new research in the rare-earths and actinides to inform and influence the next generation of scientists and keep the field as vibrant as it is today.

Indonesia in a Reforming World Economy: Effects on Agriculture, Trade and the Environment

Authors: --- --- ---
ISBN: 9780980623871 Year: Pages: 266 DOI: 10.1017/UPO9780980623871 Language: English
Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
Subject: Economics
Added to DOAB on : 2012-05-14 08:42:51
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In the mid-1990s a joint research project was established between CASER (Bogor), CIES (Adelaide), CSIS ( Jakarta) and RSPAS (at ANU, Canberra) to examine interactions between agriculture, trade and the environment in Indonesia. Funded by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR Project No. 9449), the specific objective of the project was to assess the production, consumption, trade, income distributional, regional, environmental, and welfare eff ects in Indonesia of structural and policy changes at home and abroad. Particular attention was to be paid to those structural and policy changes that could aff ect Indonesia’s agricultural sector over the next 5-10 years.

The implications of national and global economic growth, of regional and multilateral trade liberalisation initiatives, and of Indonesia’s ongoing unilateral policy reforms were the initial focus of the study. However, with the onslaught of the financial crisis that began in the latter part of 1997, the project leaders added that issue to the research agenda.

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