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Marine Lipids 2017

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ISBN: 9783038427995 9783038428008 Year: Pages: VIII, 160
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Education
Added to DOAB on : 2018-04-17 13:04:57
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Marine organisms are a well-known source of lipids with high nutritional value, such as n-3 fatty acids (e.g., 20:5 and 22:6), but also possess bioactive properties (e.g., polar lipids as glycolipids and phospholipids). Polar lipids are considered high added value bioactive molecules with health promoting effects, and with potential applications in food, feed, and pharmaceutical industries. Although some polar lipids of marine organisms are known to have functional properties (e.g., anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, antioxidant and antimicrobial), the potential of these molecules is yet to be fully unravelled, as the lipidome of the majority of marine organisms remains largely unknown. Different marine organisms, even when closely related in the tree of life, display specific lipidome signatures, which are representative of the remarkable chemical biodiversity present in world oceans. Lipid composition can also change due to environmental and nutritional conditions. If one considers that each marine organism contains thousands of structurally and functionally diverse lipids, it is clear that the characterization of their lipidome is a challenging task. Nonetheless, in recent years, advanced analytical approaches coupling chromatography and mass spectrometry have emerged as powerful tools in lipidomic analysis. The resolution and high throughput analysis achieved with these analytical approaches has allowed researchers to identify and quantify the lipid species present on the cells and tissues of a diversity of marine organisms, opening new perspectives in the identification of lipid signatures for their valorisation and biotechnological applications.

Obesity and Diabetes: Energy Regulation by Free Fatty Acid Receptors

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889197477 Year: Pages: 45 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-747-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Internal medicine --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-07 11:22:02
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Food intake regulates energy balance and its dysregulation leads to metabolic disorder, such as obesity and diabetes. During feeding, free fatty acids (FFAs) are not only essential nutrients but also act as signaling molecules in various cellular processes. Recently, several orphan G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that act as FFA receptors (FFARs) have been identified; GPR40/FFAR1, GPR119, and GPR120 are activated by medium- and long-chain FFAs. GPR84 is activated by medium-chain FFAs. GPR41/FFAR3 and GPR43/FFAR2 are activated by short-chain FFAs. These FFARs have come to be regarded as new drug targets for metabolic disorder such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, because a number of pharmacological and physiological studies have shown that these receptors are primarily involved in the energy metabolism in various tissues; insulin secretion, gastrointestinal hormone secretion, adipokine secretion, regulation of inflammation, regulation of autonomic nervous system, relation to gut microbiota, and so on. This Research Topic provides a comprehensive overview of the energy regulation by free fatty acid receptors and a new prospect for treatment of metabolic disorder such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Nutrition and Cancer

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ISBN: 9783038428916 9783038428923 Year: Pages: VIII, 206 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Oncology --- Internal medicine
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:04:15
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The development and treatment of cancer presents a complex interaction between tumor and host. Provision of nutrients not only enables the maintenance of nutritional status, but also provides substrates and signals for immunity, tumor metabolism and protection of the host from treatment toxicities. Fat is one dietary element that has been explored for its role in cancer development. While the bulk of these studies have been observational or experimental, the evidence assembled suggests that dietary lipids behave uniquely to prevent or promote cancers. An additional aspect of cancer development is the role of adipose tissue as a source of, and a responder to, inflammatory signals that may be involved in tumor development. This Special Issue of Nutrients focuses on fat and cancer. The contributors to this Special Issue are well-recognized leaders in the field of cancer and have unique areas of focus including metabolism, immunology, biochemistry, epidemiology and nutrition. Each contribution highlights the latest research in these areas and what is known about fat and cancer with topics ranging from diet and cancer prevention, mechanisms of n-3 fatty acids on tumor development and the role of adipose tissue in cancer development and progression.

Insights into Microbe-Microbe Interactions in Human Microbial Ecosystems: Strategies to be Competitive

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889450527 Year: Pages: 116 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-052-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Microbiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-07-06 13:27:36
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All parts of our body having communication with the external environment such as the skin, vagina, the respiratory tract or the gastrointestinal tract are colonized by a specific microbial community. The colon is by far the most densely populated organ in the human body. The pool of microbes inhabiting our body is known as “microbiota” and their collective genomes as “microbiome”. These microbial ecosystems regulate important functions of the host, and their functionality and the balance among the diverse microbial populations is essential for the maintenance of a “healthy status”. The impressive development in recent years of next generation sequencing (NGS) methods have made possible to determine the gut microbiome composition. This, together with the application of other high throughput omic techniques and the use of gnotobiotic animals has greatly improved our knowledge of the microbiota acting as a whole. In spite of this, most members of the human microbiota are largely unknown and remain still uncultured. The final functionality of the microbiota is depending not only on nutrient availability and environmental conditions, but also on the interrelationships that the microorganisms inhabiting the same ecological niche are able to establish with their partners, or with their potential competitors. Therefore, in such a competitive environment microorganisms have had to develop strategies allowing them to cope, adapt, or cooperate with their neighbors, which may imply notable changes at metabolic, physiological and genetic level. The main aim of this Research Topic was to contribute to better understanding complex interactions among microorganisms residing in human microbial habitats.All parts of our body having communication with the external environment such as the skin, vagina, the respiratory tract or the gastrointestinal tract are colonized by a specific microbial community. The colon is by far the most densely populated organ in the human body. The pool of microbes inhabiting our body is known as “microbiota” and their collective genomes as “microbiome”. These microbial ecosystems regulate important functions of the host, and their functionality and the balance among the diverse microbial populations is essential for the maintenance of a “healthy status”. The impressive development in recent years of next generation sequencing (NGS) methods have made possible to determine the gut microbiome composition. This, together with the application of other high throughput omic techniques and the use of gnotobiotic animals has greatly improved our knowledge of the microbiota acting as a whole. In spite of this, most members of the human microbiota are largely unknown and remain still uncultured. The final functionality of the microbiota is depending not only on nutrient availability and environmental conditions, but also on the interrelationships that the microorganisms inhabiting the same ecological niche are able to establish with their partners, or with their potential competitors. Therefore, in such a competitive environment microorganisms have had to develop strategies allowing them to cope, adapt, or cooperate with their neighbors, which may imply notable changes at metabolic, physiological and genetic level. The main aim of this Research Topic was to contribute to better understanding complex interactions among microorganisms residing in human microbial habitats.

Impact of Lipid Peroxidation on the Physiology and Pathophysiology of Cell Membranes

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889450824 Year: Pages: 88 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-082-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Physiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-07-06 13:27:36
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The general process of lipid peroxidation consists of three stages: initiation, propagation, and termination. The initiation phase of lipid peroxidation includes hydrogen atom abstraction. Several species can abstract the first hydrogen atom and include the radicals: hydroxyl, alkoxyl, peroxyl, and possibly HO* 2. The membrane lipids, mainly phospholipids, containing polyunsaturated fatty acids are predominantly susceptible to peroxidation because abstraction from a methylene group of a hydrogen atom, which contains only one electron, leaves at the back an unpaired electron on the carbon. The initial reaction of *OH with polyunsaturated fatty acids produces a lipid radical (L*), which in turn reacts with molecular oxygen to form a lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH). Further, the LOOH formed can suffer reductive cleavage by reduced metals, such as Fe++, producing lipid alkoxyl radical (LO*). Peroxidation of lipids can disturb the assembly of the membrane, causing changes in fluidity and permeability, alterations of ion transport and inhibition of metabolic processes. In addition, LOOH can break down, frequently in the presence of reduced metals or ascorbate, to reactive aldehyde products, including malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (4-HHE) and acrolein. Lipid peroxidation is one of the major outcomes of free radical-mediated injury to tissue mainly because it can greatly alter the physicochemical properties of membrane lipid bilayers, resulting in severe cellular dysfunction. In addition, a variety of lipid by-products are produced as a consequence of lipid peroxidation, some of which can exert beneficial biological effects under normal physiological conditions. Intensive research performed over the last decades have also revealed that by-products of lipid peroxidation are also involved in cellular signalling and transduction pathways under physiological conditions, and regulate a variety of cellular functions, including normal aging. In the present collection of articles, both aspects (adverse and benefitial) of lipid peroxidation are illustrated in different biological paradigms. We expect this eBook may encourage readers to expand the current knowledge on the complexity of physiological and pathophysiological roles of lipid peroxidation.

Fatty Acids and Cardiometabolic Health

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ISBN: 9783038978909 / 9783038978916 Year: Pages: 202 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-891-6 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Nutrition and Food Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-26 08:44:06
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The impact of fat intake on hypercholesterolemia and related atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases has been studied for decades. However, the current evidence base suggests that fatty acids also influences cardiometabolic diseases through other mechanisms including effects on glucose metabolism, body fat distribution, blood pressure, inflammation, and heart rate. Furthermore, studies evaluating single fatty acids have challenged the simplistic view of shared health effects within fatty acid groups categorized by degree of saturation. In addition, investigations of endogenous fatty acid metabolism, including genetic studies of fatty acid metabolizing enzymes, and the identification of novel metabolically derived fatty acids have further increased the complexity of fatty acids’ health impacts. This Special Issue aims to include original research and up-to-date reviews on genetic and dietary modulation of fatty acids, and the role and function of dietary and metabolically derived fatty acids in cardiometabolic health.

Breastfeeding and Human Lactation

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ISBN: 9783038979302 / 9783038979319 Year: Pages: 450 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-931-9 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Nutrition and Food Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-26 08:44:06
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Human lactation has evolved to produce a milk composition that is uniquely-designed for the human infant. Not only does human milk optimize infant growth and development, it also provides protection from infection and disease. More recently, the importance of human milk and breastfeeding in the programming of infant health has risen to the fore. Anchoring of infant feeding in the developmental origins of health and disease has led to a resurgence of research focused in this area. Milk composition is highly variable both between and within mothers. Indeed the distinct maternal human milk signature, including its own microbiome, is influenced by environmental factors, such as diet, health, body composition and geographic residence. An understanding of these changes will lead to unravelling the adaptation of milk to the environment and its impact on the infant. In terms of the promotion of breastfeeding, health economics and epidemiology is instrumental in shaping public health policy and identifying barriers to breastfeeding. Further, basic research is imperative in order to design evidence-based interventions to improve both breastfeeding duration and women’s breastfeeding experience.

Keywords

human milk --- breastfed infants --- body composition --- anthropometrics --- milk intake --- bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy --- ultrasound skinfolds --- maternal factors --- infant --- feeding --- preterm --- premature --- bottle --- human milk --- breastfeeding --- nipple shield --- infant feeding --- choline --- phosphocholine --- glycerophosphocholine --- lactation --- human milk --- infants --- adequate intake --- dietary recommendations --- Canada --- Cambodia --- breast milk --- galactogogues --- mothers of preterm infants --- breastfeeding --- attitudes --- knowledge --- midwifery --- formula supplementation --- justification of supplementation --- maternal wellbeing --- maternal distress --- post-partum distress --- breastfeeding support --- paternal role --- partner support --- infant --- Ireland --- passive immunity --- antibodies --- lactation --- peptidomics --- prematurity --- proteolysis --- breast milk --- preterm infant --- enteral nutrition --- lipids --- omega-3 fatty acids --- omega-6 fatty acids --- Docosahexaenoic acid --- Arachidonic acid --- long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids --- pregnancy --- breast milk --- lactation --- maternal diet --- n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid --- docosahexaenoic acid --- zinc deficiency --- plasma zinc --- lactating women --- zinc supplementation --- Quito --- Ecuador --- Andean region --- GDM --- lactation --- thyroid --- triiodothyronine --- thyroxine --- thyroid antibodies --- breastfeeding --- knowledge --- practice --- barriers --- social support --- professional support --- raw breast milk --- cytomegalovirus --- milk-acquired infections --- preterm infant --- adipokines --- adiponectin --- leptin --- breastfeeding --- infant --- body composition --- bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy --- ultrasound skinfolds --- human milk --- lactation --- human lactation --- expressing --- milk synthesis --- fat synthesis --- human milk --- milk metabolites --- lactation --- milk metabolomics --- human milk --- breastfeeding --- lactation --- lipids --- lipidomics --- mass spectrometry --- chromatography --- NMR spectroscopy --- human milk --- sex-specificity --- infant growth --- early life nutrition --- postnatal outcomes --- breastfeeding --- breast milk --- human milk --- colostrum --- IgA --- HGF --- TGF-? --- growth factors --- geographical location --- human milk --- potassium --- sodium --- ICP-OES --- ion selective electrode --- lactoferrin --- human milk --- infection --- immunity --- antisecretory factor --- human milk --- breast milk --- breastfeeding --- inflammation --- lactoferrin --- candida --- human milk --- milk cells --- immune cells --- antimicrobial proteins --- human milk --- breastfeeding --- ethnicity --- composition --- diet --- responsive feeding --- breastfeeding --- breastmilk --- babywearing --- co-sleeping --- mother–infant interaction --- feeding cues --- maternal responsiveness --- mother–infant physical contact --- proximal care --- fatty acids --- long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids --- endocannabinoids --- infant health --- breast milk --- casein --- whey --- protein --- breastfeeding --- infant --- body composition --- bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy --- ultrasound skinfolds --- human milk --- calculated daily intakes --- lactation --- human milk --- metabolites --- microbiome --- mode of delivery --- caesarean section --- proton nuclear magnetic resonance --- breastfeeding --- human milk composition --- body composition --- maternal diet --- infant growth --- appetite regulation --- N-acylethanolamines --- OEA --- SEA --- PEA --- breastfeeding --- human milk composition --- obesity --- Breastfeeding --- human lactation --- lactation --- human milk --- breast milk --- milk composition

Special Issue Dedicated to Late Professor Takuo Okuda. Tannins and Related Polyphenols Revisited: Chemistry, Biochemistry and Biological Activities

Authors: --- ---
ISBN: 9783038978343 / 9783038978350 Year: Pages: 316 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-835-0 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-26 10:09:00
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Antioxidative polyphenols represented by tannins and flavonoids are rich in numerous food sources and traditional natural medicines and currently attracting increased attention in health care and food industries because of their multiple biological activities that are favorable to human health. Commemorating the outstanding achievements on tannins by Dr. Takuo Okuda on the occasion of his passing away in December 2016, his colleagues, friends, and worldwide experts of polyphenol research have contributed 18 papers on their recent study to the Special Issue of Molecules. This book is its reprinted form. This covers reviews of structural features, historical usages, and biological activities of unique class of ellagitannins and condensed tannins, and original articles on the most up-to-date findings on the anticancer effect of green tea catechins, the antivirus effect of tannins comparing with the clinically used drugs, the analytical method of ellagitannins using quantitative NMR, the chemical structures of Hydrangea-blue complex (pigment) and condensed tannins in Ephedra sinica and purple prairie clover, and the relationship of condensed tannins in legumes and grape-marc with methane production in the in vitro ruminant system, and others. This book will be useful to natural product chemists and also to researchers in pharmaceutical and/or food industry.

Keywords

Dittrichia viscosa --- antifungal activities --- Candida spp. --- Malassezia spp. --- Microsporum canis --- Aspergillus fumigates --- Ephedra sinica --- proanthocyanidin --- oligomer --- thiolysis --- phloroglucinolysis --- TDDFT --- ECD --- neuraminidase --- inhibition --- tannins --- oseltamivir carboxylate --- zanamivir --- crystal structure --- molecular interactions --- oenothein B --- ellagitannin --- macrocyclic oligomer --- Onagraceae --- Myrtaceae --- Lythraceae --- antioxidants --- antitumor effect --- immunomodulatory effect --- anti-inflammation --- tannin composition --- purple prairie clover --- conservation method --- protein precipitation --- Escherichia coli --- Cynanchum wilfordii --- phenolic glycoside --- 2-O-?-laminaribiosyl-4-hydroxyacetophenone --- cynandione A --- thin layer chromatography --- Cynanchum auriculatum --- Acacia mearnsii bark --- wattle tannin --- proanthocyanidins --- biological activities --- tannins --- vegetable tanning --- European historic leathers --- colorimetric tests --- spectroscopy --- UV-Vis --- FTIR --- triple-negative breast cancer --- fatty acid synthase --- FASN inhibition --- polyphenolic FASN inhibitors --- (?)-epigallocatechin 3-gallate --- synthetic analogues --- apoptosis --- anticancer activity --- 1H-NMR --- quantitative NMR --- ellagitannin --- Geranium thunbergii --- geraniin --- Aluminum ion --- blue color development --- 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid --- 3-O-glucosyldelphinidin --- Hydrangea macrophylla --- ESI-mass --- metal complex --- Coreopsis lanceolata L. --- chalcone --- flavanone --- flavonol --- aurone --- Horner–Wadsworth–Emmons reaction --- condensed tannin --- bioactivity --- methanogenesis --- grape marc --- fatty acids --- in vitro batch fermentation --- neuroprotection --- PC12 --- NGF --- differentiation --- amyloid-? peptide --- taxanes --- hormesis --- polyphenol --- bamboo leaf extract --- overlay method --- ellagitannin --- structure --- revision --- (?)-epigallocatechin gallate --- immune checkpoint --- interferon-? --- epidermal growth factor --- lung tumor --- proanthocyanidins --- condensed tannins --- thiolysis --- NMR spectroscopy --- ultrahigh-resolution negative mode MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry --- antioxidant --- ORAC assay --- Acacia --- forage legume --- Trapa taiwanensis Nakai --- hydrolysable tannin --- stability --- gallotannin --- ellagitannin

Promising Detoxification Strategies to Mitigate Mycotoxins in Food and Feed

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ISBN: 9783038970286 / 9783038970279 Year: Pages: 306 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-027-9 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Public Health
Added to DOAB on : 2019-08-28 11:21:28
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Abstract

This book is a printed edition of the Special Issue Promising Detoxification Strategies to Mitigate Mycotoxins in Food and Feed that was published in Toxins

Keywords

deoxynivalenol --- epimer --- polarity --- Tri101 --- molecular --- interactions --- spores of Ganoderma lucidum --- oxidative stress --- aflatoxins --- antioxidant capability --- mycotoxin --- patulin --- biodegradation --- Pichia caribbica --- proteomics --- intracellular and extracellular enzymes --- Bacillus licheniformis CK1 --- zearalenone (ZEA) --- serum hormones --- estrogen receptor (ER) --- post-weaning female piglets --- curcumin --- aflatoxin B1 --- CYP450 --- AFBO–DNA --- chicks --- aflatoxin B1 --- photodegradation product --- TQEF-MS/MS --- cell viability --- furan rings --- mycotoxin --- toxigenic Fusarium --- biological control --- Trichoderma --- modified mycotoxin --- aflatoxin B1 --- aflatoxin biodegradation preparation --- Bacillus subtilis ANSB060 --- ameliorating effects --- growth performance --- antioxidant function --- residue --- aflatoxins --- biotransformation --- enzymatic detoxification --- laccase --- mild technologies --- food safety --- mycotoxins mitigation --- aflatoxin B1 --- aflatoxin-degrading enzyme --- biodegradation --- Bacillus shackletonii --- purification --- Sporobolomyces sp. IAM 13481 --- microbial patulin degradation --- desoxypatulinic acid --- ascladiol --- aflatoxins --- Aspergillus flavus --- Corylus avellana --- fatty acids --- thermal treatment --- Aflatoxin B1 --- Aspergillus flavus --- hyssop --- inhibition --- oxidative stress --- DBD --- atmospheric pressure --- low temperature plasma --- mycotoxins --- degradation --- maize --- aflatoxins --- neutral electrolyzed water --- detoxification --- turkey --- mycotoxins --- biotransformation --- degradation --- enzymes --- application --- mycotoxin --- detoxification --- biodegradation --- biotransformation --- enzyme --- microorganism identification --- mycotoxin --- trichothecene --- deoxynivalenol --- bioprospecting --- detoxification --- Fusarium --- cold atmospheric pressure plasma technology --- mycotoxins --- physical decontamination --- chemical decontamination --- biological decontamination --- patulin --- mycotoxin --- mitigation --- decontamination --- food and beverage --- processing --- n/a

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