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The chronic challenge - new vistas on long-term multisite contacts to the central nervous system

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889195084 Year: Pages: 161 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-508-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-03 13:02:24
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Have you ever heard of a Hype-Cycle? It is a description that was put forward by an IT consultancy firm to describe certain phenomena that happen within the life cycle of new technology products. As Fenn and Raskino stated in their book (Fenn and Raskino 2008), a novel technology - a - “Technology Trigger” - gives rise to a steep increase in interest, leading to the “Peak of Inflated Expectations”. Following an accumulation of more detailed knowledge on the technology and its short-comings, the stake holders may need to traverse a “Trough of Disillusionment”, which is followed by a shallower “Slope of Enlightenment”, before finally reaching the “Plateau of Productivity”. In spite of the limitations and criticisms levied on this over-simplified description of a technology’s life-cycle, it is nonetheless able to describe well the situation we are all experiencing within the brain-machine-interfacing community. Our technology trigger was the development of batch-processed multisite neuronal interfaces based on silicon during the 1980s and 1990s (Sangler and Wise 1990, Campbell, Jones et al. 1991, Wise and Najafi 1991, Rousche and Normann 1992, Nordhausen, Maynard et al. 1996). This gave rise to a seemingly exponential growth of knowledge within the neurosciences, leading to the expectation of thought-controlled devices and prostheses for handicapped people in the very near future (Chapin, Moxon et al. 1999, Wessberg, Stambaugh et al. 2000, Chapin and Moxon 2001, Serruya, Hatsopoulos et al. 2002). Unfortunately, whereas significant steps towards artificial robotic limbs could have been implemented during the last decade (Johannes, Bigelow et al. 2011, Oung, Pohl et al. 2012, Belter, Segil et al. 2013), direct invasive intracortical interfacing was not quite able to keep up with these expectations. Insofar, we are currently facing the challenging, but tedious walk through the Trough of Disillusionment. Undoubtedly, more than two decades of intense research on brain-machine-interfaces (BMI’s) have produced a tremendous wealth of information towards the ultimate goal: a clinically useful cortical prosthesis. Unfortunately even today - after huge fiscal efforts - the goal seems almost to be as far away as it was when it was originally put forward. At the very least, we have to state that one of the main challenges towards a clinical useful BMI has not been sufficiently answered yet: regarding the long term – or even truly chronic – stability of the neural cortical interface, as well as the signals it has to provide over a significant fraction of a human’s lifespan. Even the recently demonstrated advances in BMI’s in both humans and non-human primates have to deal with a severe decay of spiking activity that occurs over weeks and months (Chestek, Gilja et al. 2011, Hochberg, Bacher et al. 2012, Collinger, Kryger et al. 2014, Nuyujukian, Kao et al. 2014, Stavisky, Kao et al. 2014, Wodlinger, Downey et al. 2014) and resolve to simplified features to keep a brain-derived communication channel open (Christie, Tat et al. 2014).

Neural Microelectrodes: Design and Applications

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ISBN: 9783039213191 / 9783039213207 Year: Pages: 378 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-320-7 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Technology (General) --- General and Civil Engineering
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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Neural electrodes enable the recording and stimulation of bioelectrical activity in the nervous system. This technology provides neuroscientists with the means to probe the functionality of neural circuitry in both health and disease. In addition, neural electrodes can deliver therapeutic stimulation for the relief of debilitating symptoms associated with neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease and may serve as the basis for the restoration of sensory perception through peripheral nerve and brain regions after disease or injury. Lastly, microscale neural electrodes recording signals associated with volitional movement in paralyzed individuals can be decoded for controlling external devices and prosthetic limbs or driving the stimulation of paralyzed muscles for functional movements. In spite of the promise of neural electrodes for a range of applications, chronic performance remains a goal for long-term basic science studies, as well as clinical applications. New perspectives and opportunities from fields including tissue biomechanics, materials science, and biological mechanisms of inflammation and neurodegeneration are critical to advances in neural electrode technology. This Special Issue will address the state-of-the-art knowledge and emerging opportunities for the development and demonstration of advanced neural electrodes.

Keywords

neural interface --- silicon carbide --- robust microelectrode --- microelectrode array --- liquid crystal elastomer --- neuronal recordings --- neural interfacing --- micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies --- microelectromechanical systems --- neuroscientific research --- magnetic coupling --- freely-behaving --- microelectrodes --- in vivo electrophysiology --- neural interfaces --- enteric nervous system --- conscious recording --- electrode implantation --- intracranial electrodes --- foreign body reaction --- electrode degradation --- glial encapsulation --- electrode array --- microelectrodes --- neural recording --- silicon probe --- three-dimensional --- electroless plating --- intracortical implant --- microelectrodes --- stiffness --- immunohistochemistry --- immune response --- neural interface response --- neural interface --- micromachine --- neuroscience --- biocompatibility --- training --- education --- diversity --- bias --- BRAIN Initiative --- multi-disciplinary --- micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) --- n/a --- silicon neural probes --- LED chip --- thermoresistance --- temperature monitoring --- optogenetics --- microfluidic device --- chronic implantation --- gene modification --- neural recording --- neural amplifier --- microelectrode array --- intracortical --- sensor interface --- windowed integration sampling --- mixed-signal feedback --- multiplexing --- amorphous silicon carbide --- neural stimulation and recording --- insertion force --- microelectrodes --- neural interfaces --- intracortical --- microelectrodes --- shape-memory-polymer --- electrophysiology --- electrode --- artifact --- electrophysiology --- electrochemistry --- fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) --- neurotechnology --- neural interface --- neuromodulation --- neuroprosthetics --- brain-machine interfaces --- intracortical implant --- microelectrodes --- softening --- immunohistochemistry --- immune response --- neural interface --- shape memory polymer --- deep brain stimulation --- fast scan cyclic voltammetry --- dopamine --- glassy carbon electrode --- magnetic resonance imaging --- system-on-chip --- neuromodulation --- bidirectional --- closed-loop --- sciatic nerve --- vagus nerve --- precision medicine --- neural probe --- intracortical --- microelectrodes --- bio-inspired --- polymer nanocomposite --- cellulose nanocrystals --- photolithography --- Parylene C --- impedance --- Utah electrode arrays --- electrode–tissue interface --- peripheral nerves --- wireless --- implantable --- microstimulators --- neuromodulation --- peripheral nerve stimulation --- neural prostheses --- microelectrode --- neural interfaces --- dextran --- neural probe --- microfabrication --- foreign body reaction --- immunohistochemistry --- polymer --- chronic --- electrocorticography --- ECoG --- micro-electrocorticography --- µECoG --- neural electrode array --- neural interfaces --- electrophysiology --- brain–computer interface --- in vivo imaging --- tissue response --- graphene --- n/a

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