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Roy & Me: This Is Not a Memoir

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Book Series: Mingling Voices ISSN: 19179413 ISBN: 9781926836102 9781926836119 Year: Pages: 147 Language: English
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Added to DOAB on : 2012-03-29 16:37:58
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Maurice Yacowar challenges genre and form in Roy & Me, a cross between memoir and fiction, truth and distortion. It is the exploration of Yacowar’s relationship with Roy Farran—soldier, politician, author, mentor—and his conflict with Farran’s anti-Semitic past. Best known for his service with the British Special Air Service during World War II, Roy Farran served as a politician in the Legislative Assembly of Alberta for Premier Peter Lougheed. During his time in Israel as a soldier, Farran allegedly kidnapped and murdered a sixteen-year-old member of the Lehi group, also known as the Stern Gang. Roy & Me is a memoir that edges toward fiction by venturing into Roy Farran’s thoughts, drawing simultaneously on his writings and Yacowar’s own imagination.

Keywords

memoir --- fiction --- anti-semitism --- friendship

As três moedas (Trinummus)

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Book Series: Autores Gregos e Latinos - Ensaios ISSN: 2183220X ISBN: 9789892608976 Year: Pages: 122 DOI: https://doi.org/10.14195/978-989-26-0898-3 Language: Portuguese
Publisher: Coimbra University Press
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-07 12:22:19
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Trinummus is another fabula palliata by Plautus. Enriched by the art of the Latin author, the result was too tedious and very elitist, compared to what usually characterized the Plautine comic. Through stock characters of fixed social types (e.g. the old, the Young, the slaves), several cultural themes are analyzed, such as friendship, morality, loyalty, money. Thus, the senex Charmides, whose assets were in danger because of the conduct of his son, Lesbonicus, leaves Athens. Meanwhile, his young son and daughter were trusted to his friend Callicles, as well as his house. Secretly, Callicles told Charmides about the treasure buried in his home. However, Charmides was in a dilemma, between keeping the secret of his friend and avoiding the dissolute spirit of Lesbonicus. Using his father’s journey to his own profit, the youngster put the house for sale. Therefore, Callicles felt the moral obligation of purchasing it. Lisiteles involuntarily made the situation worse, because of his intention to marry Lesbonicus’ sister. The proposal required a dowry, which constituted a problem to Lesbonicus and to Callicles. This senior, wrongly judged both socially (cf. Megaronides), and privately (cf. Charmides, who had returned from his trip), was finally thanked and praised, when all the facts were acknowledged.

Keywords

Friendship --- fidelity --- appearance --- truth --- adolescence --- treasure

The Communism of Thought

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ISBN: 9780615986968 Year: Pages: 90 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0059.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Philosophy
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:42
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The Communism of Thought takes as its point of departure a passage in a letter from Dionys Mascolo to Gilles Deleuze: “I have called this communism of thought in the past. And I placed it under the auspices of Hölderlin, who may have only fled thought because he was unable to live it: ‘The life of the spirit between friends, the thoughts that form in the exchange of words, by writing or in person, are necessary to those who seek. Without that, we are by our own hands outside thought.’” What, in light of that imperative, is a correspondence? What is given to be understood by the word, let alone the phenomenon? What constitutes a correspondence? What occasions it? On what terms and according to what conditions may one enter into that exchange “necessary,” in Hölderlin’s words, “to those who seek”? Pursuant to what vicissitudes may it be conducted? And what end(s) might a correspondence come to have beyond the ostensible end that, to all appearances, it (inevitably) will be said to have had?

Encheiridion de Epicteto

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Book Series: Autores Gregos e Latinos - Textos ISSN: 2183220X ISBN: 9789892608242 Year: Pages: 98 DOI: https://doi.org/10.14195/978-989-26-0825-9 Language: Portuguese
Publisher: Coimbra University Press
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-07 12:22:19
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In this comedy of deception and conflict of values, the young Philolaches, taking advantage of the absence of the father, became indebted due to the parties he has hosted and the purchase of his beloved courtesan. The unexpected return of the senex requires the ingenious scheme of the slave Tranio. Once given the news that the house was haunted, the money loaned from the usurer was justified, to purchase the house of the neighbor. After all the scenes of quid pro quo were clarified, Callidamates, a friend of Philolaches, conveys the comedy to a happy ending - after stabilizing the situation, arguing that the money will be restored, the senex Theopropides gives his forgiveness.

A comédia do fantasma ('Mostellaria')

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Book Series: Autores Gregos e Latinos - Ensaios ISSN: 2183220X ISBN: 9789892608952 Year: Pages: 138 DOI: https://doi.org/10.14195/978-989-26-0896-9 Language: Portuguese
Publisher: Coimbra University Press
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-08 16:51:30
License: Coimbra University Press

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In this comedy of deception and conflict of values, the young Philolaches, taking advantage of the absence of the father, became indebted due to the parties he has hosted and the purchase of his beloved courtesan. The unexpected return of the senex requires the ingenious scheme of the slave Tranio. Once given the news that the house was haunted, the money loaned from the usurer was justified, to purchase the house of the neighbor. After all the scenes of quid pro quo were clarified, Callidamates, a friend of Philolaches, conveys the comedy to a happy ending - after stabilizing the situation, arguing that the money will be restored, the senex Theopropides gives his forgiveness.

Difference and Disability in the Medieval Islamic World

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ISBN: 9780748645077 9780748645084 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 100961
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-01-25 11:01:48
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Medieval Arab notions of physical difference can feel singularly arresting for modern audiences. Did you know that blue eyes, baldness, bad breath and boils were all considered bodily ‘blights’, as were cross eyes, lameness and deafness? What assumptions about bodies influenced this particular vision of physical difference? How did blighted people view their own bodies? Through close analyses of miniature paintings, personal letters, (auto)biographies, travel narratives, erotic poetry, religious polemics, diaristic chronicles and theological tracts, you will learn about cultural views and lived experiences of disability and difference.

Keywords

History --- islamic --- Arab --- disability --- friendship --- bodies --- masculinity --- Mamluk --- Ottoman --- Cairo --- Damasvus --- Mecca --- classical Arabic

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