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Open Access and the Humanities : Contexts, Controversies and the Future

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ISBN: 9781316161012 9781107097896 9781107484016 Year: Pages: 226 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781316161012 Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Subject: Multidisciplinary
Added to DOAB on : 2014-11-28 10:03:47
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If you work in a university, you are almost certain to have heard the term 'open access' in the past couple of years. You may also have heard either that it is the utopian answer to all the problems of research dissemination or perhaps that it marks the beginning of an apocalyptic new era of 'pay-to-say' publishing. In this book, Martin Paul Eve sets out the histories, contexts and controversies for open access, specifically in the humanities. Broaching practical elements alongside economic histories, open licensing, monographs and funder policies, this book is a must-read for both those new to ideas about open-access scholarly communications and those with an already keen interest in the latest developments for the humanities.

- Provides a comprehensive guide to open access for humanities researchers, written by a humanities researcher
- Covers a full range of phenomena concerning open access and the humanities, including economics, funder policies, open licensing and monographs
- Situates open access within broader paradigms of politics and the university, not shying away from controversy

Diamanten, Dynamit und Diplomatie: Die Lipperts. Hamburger Kaufleute in imperialer Zeit

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Book Series: Mäzene für Wissenschaft ISBN: 9783943423457 Year: DOI: 10.15460/HUP.MFW.20.181 Language: German
Publisher: Hamburg University Press
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:33:19
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As Hamburg merchants, the Lipperts have successfully traded with South Africa since the 1850s. As donators they have earned their living in their hometown for decades. The family's ancestor, David Lippert, came to Hamburg from Mecklenburg in the early 1830s. His marriage gave him access to the upper class - and a widely ramified family: The Hahns, the Robinows and the Beits belonged to the next of kin, later also the Zacharias, Wibel, Bunsen, Bülau and Wentzel families.The focus of this publication is the life of three sons of David Lippert: the brothers Ludwig Julius (1835-1918), Wilhelm August (1845-1918) and Eduard Amandus (1844-1925). Ludwig belonged to the founding generation of the diamond industry in South Africa - and was one of the initiators of the Bismarck Monument at the Millerntor. William became consul in Cape Town just at the time when the Empire acquired "Deutsch-Südwest" ("German Southwest"), the first German colony. Eduard became an opponent of the British imperialist Cecil Rhodes in the Transvaal as a friend of President Paul Kruger. In Hamburg he was known as a patron of the observatory.The life of the three brothers as art collectors, founders, builders, landowners, rich in battles, blows of fate, defeats and victories is described for the first time in this dedicated publication of the series Mäzene für Wissenschaft of the Hamburgische Wissenschaftliche Stiftung.

Keywords

trade --- merchant --- funder --- Germany --- colony --- history --- 19th century --- 20th century

Open Access and the Library

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ISBN: 9783038977407 Year: Pages: 142 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-741-4 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Media and communication
Added to DOAB on : 2019-04-05 10:34:31
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Libraries are places of learning and knowledge creation. Over the last two decades, digital technology—and the changes that came with it—have accelerated this transformation to a point where evolution starts to become a revolution.The wider Open Science movement, and Open Access in particular, is one of these changes and is already having a profound impact. Under the subscription model, the role of libraries was to buy or license content on behalf of their users and then act as gatekeepers to regulate access on behalf of rights holders. In a world where all research is open, the role of the library is shifting from licensing and disseminating to facilitating and supporting the publishing process itself.This requires a fundamental shift in terms of structures, tasks, and skills. It also changes the idea of a library’s collection. Under the subscription model, contemporary collections largely equal content bought from publishers. Under an open model, the collection is more likely to be the content created by the users of the library (researchers, staff, students, etc.), content that is now curated by the library.Instead of selecting external content, libraries have to understand the content created by their own users and help them to make it publicly available—be it through a local repository, payment of article processing charges, or through advice and guidance. Arguably, this is an overly simplified model that leaves aside special collections and other areas. Even so, it highlights the changes that research libraries are undergoing, changes that are likely to accelerate as a result of initiatives such as Plan S.This Special Issue investigates some of the changes in today’s library services that relate to open access.

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