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Biomarkers in Drug Hypersensitivity

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889452262 Year: Pages: 104 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-226-2 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Therapeutics --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-10-13 14:57:01
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Abstract

Biomarkers, especially those based on pharmacogenomics testing, have proved to be extremely useful for type A adverse drug reactions. Clinical practice guidelines based on biomarker testing are presently being developed and updated for type A adverse drug reactions. In contrast, little attention has been paid to the potential use of biomarkers in type B adverse reactions, characterized by the occurrence of reactions not directly related to the pharmacological properties of the drug. Drug-induced hypersensitivity belongs to those type B reactions. Drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions involve complex mechanisms that include, among others, the metabolic activation and haptenization of drug metabolites. Hence, factors that influence the pharmacokinetics of drug and metabolites may contribute to the development of some drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions. This implies that processes such as ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) that are typically involved in type A adverse drug reactions, may have a role in hypersensitivity reactions too. In addition to metabolic activation, several signal transduction pathways participate and modulate the development and the clinical presentation of drug hypersensitivity. The diverse mechanisms underlying such drug-hypersensitivity reactions lead to four major groups of reactions according to the Gell and Coombs classification: immediate, cytotoxic, immune complex and delayed. The enormous complexity of drug-hypersensitivity reactions is a consequence of the variety of mechanisms involved, which may be related, among others, to drug metabolism, generation of antigenic signals, stimulation and maturation of dendritic cells, presentation of haptens and mechanisms of cytotoxicity. In addition, a plethora of possible clinical presentations exists, including urticaria, angioedema, anaphylaxis, cytopenias, nephritis, serum sickness, vasculitis, contact dermatitis, drug rash, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, Stevens–Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. The rapid progress in the field in recent years indicates that the combination of several disciplines is essential to understand the mechanisms involved in this particular, and not completely understood, type of adverse drug reactions. The objective of this Research Topic is to present insights obtained from both basic and clinical scientists, which may include studies related to the identification, validation, refinement and clinical implementation of biomarkers for drug-induced hypersensitivity. The Topic aims to include recent findings related, but not limited to, potential phenomic, genomic, proteomic, metabolomic and signal transduction biomarkers. These biomarkers could eventually be used in clinical practice and/or these might contribute, as a proof of concept, to our understanding of the complex events leading to drug hypersensitivity reactions. In addition the Topic will cover recent developments and methodological advances in the diagnosis, prevention and therapeutic management of drug-induced hypersensitivity.

Genomics in Aquaculture to Better Understand Species Biology and Accelerate Genetic Progress

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889199570 Year: Pages: 151 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-957-0 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Genetics
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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From a global perspective aquaculture is an activity related to food production with large potential for growth. Considering a continuously growing population, the efficiency and sustainability of this activity will be crucial to meet the needs of protein for human consumption in the near future. However, for continuous enhancement of the culture of both fish and shellfish there are still challenges to overcome, mostly related to the biology of the cultured species and their interaction with (increasingly changing) environmental factors. Examples of these challenges include early sexual maturation, feed meal replacement, immune response to infectious diseases and parasites, and temperature and salinity tolerance. Moreover, it is estimated that less than 10% of the total aquaculture production in the world is based on populations genetically improved by means of artificial selection. Thus, there is considerable room for implementing breeding schemes aimed at improving productive traits having significant economic impact. By far the most economically relevant trait is growth rate, which can be efficiently improved by conventional genetic selection (i.e. based on breeding values of selection candidates). However, there are other important traits that cannot be measured directly on selection candidates, such as resistance against infectious and parasitic agents and carcass quality traits (e.g. fillet yield and meat color). However, these traits can be more efficiently improved using molecular tools to assist breeding programs by means of marker-assisted selection, using a few markers explaining a high proportion of the trait variation, or genomic selection, using thousands of markers to estimate genomic breeding values. The development and implementation of new technologies applied to molecular biology and genomics, such as next-generation sequencing methods and high-throughput genotyping platforms, are allowing the rapid increase of availability of genomic resources in aquaculture species. These resources will provide powerful tools to the research community and will aid in the determination of the genetic factors involved in several biological aspects of aquaculture species. In this regard, it is important to establish discussion in terms of which strategies will be more efficient to solve the primary challenges that are affecting aquaculture systems around the world. The main objective of this Research Topic is to provide a forum to communicate recent research and implementation strategies in the use of genomics in aquaculture species with emphasis on (1) a better understanding of fish and shellfish biological processes having considerable impact on aquaculture systems; and (2) the efficient incorporation of molecular information into breeding programs to accelerate genetic progress of economically relevant traits.

Fungal Pathogenesis in Humans: The Growing Threat

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ISBN: 9783038979005 / 9783038979012 Year: Pages: 232 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-901-2 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Genetics
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-26 08:44:06
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Cancer survival rates and successful organ transplantation in patients continues to increase due to improvements in early diagnosis and treatments. Since immuno-suppressive therapies are frequently used, the mortality rate due to secondary infections has become an ever-increasing problem. Opportunistic fungal infections are probably the deadliest threat to these patients due to their difficult early diagnosis, the limited effect of antifungal drugs and the appearance of resistances. In recent years, a considerable effort has been devoted to investigating the role of many virulence traits in the pathogenic outcome of fungal infections. New virulence factors (hypoxia adaptation, CO2 sensing, pH regulation, micronutrient acquisition, secondary metabolites, immunity regulators, etc.) have been reported and their molecular mechanisms of action are being thoroughly investigated. The recent application of gene-editing technologies such as CRISPr-Cas9, has opened a whole new window to the discovery of new fungal virulence factors. Accurate fungal genotyping, Next Generation Sequencing and RNAseq approaches will undoubtedly provide new clues to interpret the plethora of molecular interactions controlling these complex systems. Unraveling their intimate regulatory details will provide insights for a more target-focused search or a rational design of more specific antifungal agents. This Special Issue is show significant discoveries, proofs of concept of new theories or relevant observations in fungal pathogenesis and its regulation.

Plant Genetics and Molecular Breeding

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ISBN: 9783039211753 / 9783039211760 Year: Pages: 628 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-176-0 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-08-28 11:21:27
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The development of new plant varieties is a long and tedious process involving the generation of large seedling populations for the selection of the best individuals. While the ability of breeders to generate large populations is almost unlimited, the selection of these seedlings is the main factor limiting the generation of new cultivars. Molecular studies for the development of marker-assisted selection (MAS) strategies are particularly useful when the evaluation of the character is expensive, time-consuming, or with long juvenile periods. The papers published in the Special Issue “Plant Genetics and Molecular Breeding” report highly novel results and testable new models for the integrative analysis of genetic (phenotyping and transmission of agronomic characters), physiology (flowering, ripening, organ development), genomic (DNA regions responsible for the different agronomic characters), transcriptomic (gene expression analysis of the characters), proteomic (proteins and enzymes involved in the expression of the characters), metabolomic (secondary metabolites), and epigenetic (DNA methylation and histone modifications) approaches for the development of new MAS strategies. These molecular approaches together with an increasingly accurate phenotyping will facilitate the breeding of new climate-resilient varieties resistant to abiotic and biotic stress, with suitable productivity and quality, to extend the adaptation and viability of the current varieties.

Keywords

sugarcane --- cry2A gene --- particle bombardment --- stem borer --- resistance --- NPK fertilizers --- agronomic traits --- molecular markers --- quantitative trait loci --- common wild rice --- Promoter --- Green tissue-specific expression --- light-induced --- transgenic chrysanthemum --- WRKY transcription factor --- salt stress --- gene expression --- DgWRKY2 --- Cucumis sativus L. --- RNA-Seq --- DEGs --- sucrose --- ABA --- drought stress --- Aechmea fasciata --- squamosa promoter binding protein-like --- flowering time --- plant architecture --- bromeliad --- Oryza sativa --- endosperm development --- rice quality --- WB1 --- the modified MutMap method --- abiotic stress --- Cicer arietinum --- candidate genes --- genetics --- heat-stress --- molecular breeding --- metallothionein --- Brassica --- Brassica napus --- As3+ stress --- broccoli --- cytoplasmic male sterile --- bud abortion --- gene expression --- transcriptome --- RNA-Seq --- sesame --- genome-wide association study --- yield --- QTL --- candidate gene --- cabbage --- yellow-green-leaf mutant --- recombination-suppressed region --- bulk segregant RNA-seq --- differentially expressed genes --- marker–trait association --- haplotype block --- genes --- root traits --- D-genome --- genotyping-by-sequencing --- single nucleotide polymorphism --- durum wheat --- bread wheat --- complex traits --- Brassica oleracea --- Ogura-CMS --- iTRAQ --- transcriptome --- pollen development --- rice --- OsCDPK1 --- seed development, starch biosynthesis --- endosperm appearance --- Chimonanthus praecox --- nectary --- floral scent --- gene expression --- Prunus --- flowering --- bisulfite sequencing --- genomics --- epigenetics --- breeding --- AP2/ERF genes --- Bryum argenteum --- transcriptome --- gene expression --- stress tolerance --- SmJMT --- transgenic --- Salvia miltiorrhiza --- overexpression --- transcriptome --- phenolic acids --- Idesia polycarpa var --- glycine --- FAD2 --- linoleic acid --- oleic acid --- anther wall --- tapetum --- pollen accumulation --- OsGPAT3 --- rice --- cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) --- phytohormones --- differentially expressed genes --- pollen development --- Brassica napus --- Rosa rugosa --- RrGT2 gene --- Clone --- VIGS --- Overexpression --- Tobacco --- Flower color --- Anthocyanin --- sugarcane --- WRKY --- subcellular localization --- gene expression pattern --- protein-protein interaction --- transient overexpression --- soybean --- branching --- genome-wide association study (GWAS) --- near-isogenic line (NIL) --- BRANCHED1 (BRC1) --- TCP transcription factor --- Zea mays L. --- MADS transcription factor --- ZmES22 --- starch --- flowering time --- gene-by-gene interaction --- Hd1 --- Ghd7 --- rice --- yield trait --- Oryza sativa L. --- leaf shape --- yield trait --- molecular breeding --- hybrid rice --- nutrient use efficiency --- quantitative trait loci (QTLs), molecular markers --- agronomic efficiency --- partial factor productivity --- P. suffruticosa --- R2R3-MYB --- overexpression --- anthocyanin --- transcriptional regulation --- ethylene-responsive factor --- Actinidia deliciosa --- AdRAP2.3 --- gene expression --- waterlogging stress --- regulation --- Chrysanthemum morifolium --- WUS --- CYC2 --- gynomonoecy --- reproductive organ --- flower symmetry --- Hs1pro-1 --- cZR3 --- gene pyramiding --- Heterodera schachtii --- resistance --- tomato --- Elongated Internode (EI) --- QTL --- GA2ox7 --- n/a

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