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Chapter 6 - Prevention and stigma (Book chapter)

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Book Series: Social Histories of Medicine ISBN: 9781526127365 Year: Pages: 25 Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press Grant: European Commission’s OpenAIRE project
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Social Sciences --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-03-17 11:02:28
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This chapter investigates the use of quarantine as an instrument of social control and as dispositive for the construction and stigmatization of the Muslim ‘other’. The study takes the under-researched case of the Hajj to Mecca from the Balkans, hence focusing on Muslims from Bulgaria and Bosnia-Herzegovina (the latter under Austrian-Hungarian rule as from 1878). Both Bosnian and Bulgarian Muslim pilgrims experienced quarantine on their return from Mecca, yet in unequal measures. Bosnian hajjis were given a more lenient quarantine than their Bulgarian co-religionists by their separate sanitary authorities – with regard to the duration of isolation and the disinfection of their bodies and personal belongings. This was due to the different political and cultural attitudes towards their Muslim minorities by these two Balkan regimes.

Chapter 3 - Mending “Moors” in Mogador (Book chapter)

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Book Series: Social Histories of Medicine ISBN: 9781526127365 Year: Pages: 41 Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press Grant: European Commission’s OpenAIRE project
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Social Sciences --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-03-17 11:01:51
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This chapter deals with a rather unknown quarantine institution: the lazaretto of Mogador Island in Morocco. Specifically, the work explores the site’s centrality to the Spanish imperialist project of “regeneration” over of its southern neighbour. In contrast with the “civilisation” schemes deployed by the leading European imperial powers at the end of the nineteenth century, regeneration did not seek to construct a colonial Morocco but a so-called African Spain in more balanced terms with peninsular Spain. This project was to be achieved through the support and direction of ongoing Moroccan initiatives of modernisation, as well as through the training of an elite of “Moors” who were to collaborate with Spanish experts sent to the country, largely based in Tangier. Within this general context, the Mogador Island lazaretto became a key site of regeneration projects. From a sanitary and political point of view, it was meant to define a Spanish-Moroccan space by marking its new borders and also to protect “Moorish” pilgrims against both the ideological and health-related risks associated with the Mecca pilgrimage.

The Hajj and Europe in the Age of Empire

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Book Series: Leiden Studies in Islam and Society ISBN: 9789004323346 9789004323353 Year: Pages: 286 DOI: 10.1163/9789004323353 Language: English
Publisher: Brill Grant: FP7 Ideas: European Research Council - 336608
Subject: Sociology --- Religion --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2017-07-11 11:02:07
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"Killed the pilgrims and persecuted them with all kinds of cruelties": Portuguese Estado da India's encounters with the hajj in the sixteenth century / Mahmood Kooria -- "The infidel piloting the true believer": Thomas Cook and the business of the colonial hajj / Michael Christopher Low -- British colonial knowledge and the hajj in the Age of Empire / John Slight -- French policy and the hajj in late-nineteenth-century Algeria: Governor Cambon's reform attempts and Jules Gervais-Courtellemont's pilgrimage to Mecca / Aldo d'aAostini -- Heinrich Freiherr von Maltzan's "My pilgrimage to Mecca": a critical investigation / Ulrike Freitag -- Polish connections to the hajj in the nineteenth century: mystical and imaginary travels to Mecca and the Polish cultural tradition / Boguslaw R. Zagorski -- On his donkey to the mountain of 'Arafat: Dr. Van der Hoog and his hajj journey to Mecca / Umar Ryad -- "I have to disguise myself": orientalism, Gyula Germanus, and pilgrimage as cultural capital, 1935-1965 / Adam

Realizing Islam

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ISBN: 9781469660844 9781469660844 Year: Pages: 307 DOI: 10.5149/9781469660844_Wright Language: English
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press Grant: Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
Subject: Religion --- History --- Sociology
Added to DOAB on : 2020-07-29 23:59:00
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The Tijaniyya is the largest Sufi order in West and North Africa. In this unprecedented analysis of the Tijaniyya's origins and development in the late eighteenth century, Zachary Valentine Wright situates the order within the broader intellectual history of Islam in the early modern period. Introducing the group's founder, Ahmad al-Tijani (1737 - 1815), Wright focuses on the wider network in which al-Tijani traveled, revealing it as a veritable global Islamic revival whose scholars commanded large followings, shared key ideas, and produced literature read widely throughout the Muslim world. They were linked through chains of knowledge transmission from which emerged vibrant discourses of renewal in the face of perceived social and political corruption. Wright argues that this constellation of remarkable Muslim intellectuals, despite the uncertainly of the age, promoted personal verification in religious learning. With distinctive concern for the notions of human actualization and a universal human condition, the Tijaniyya emphasized the importance of the realization of Muslim identity. Since its beginnings in North Africa in the eighteenth century, the Tijaniyya has quietly expanded its influence beyond Africa, with significant populations in the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and North America.

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