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Interaction Between Hyaluronic Acid and Its Receptors (CD44, RHAMM) Regulates the Activity of Inflammation and Cancer

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889199136 Year: Pages: 218 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-913-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Abstract

The biological outcome of Hyaluronan (also hyaluronic acid, abbreviated HA) interaction with its CD44 or RHAMM receptors recently attracted much attention within the scientific community owing to a Nature article by Tian X et al. (Nature 2013; 499:346-9). The article described a life span exceeding 30 years in naked mole rats, whereas the maximal lifespan of mice, to which the naked mole rat is related, is only 4 years. This observation is accompanied by the finding that the naked mole rat, in contrast to the mouse, does not develop spontaneous tumors during this exceptional longevity. The article provides evidence that interaction of long tissue HA (6000-12,000 kDa) of the naked mole rat with cell surface CD44, in contrast to the interaction of short tissue HA (less than 3000 kDa) with the mouse CD44, makes the difference. More specifically, this communication shows that the interaction of short HA with fibroblasts’ CD44 imposes on them susceptibility for malignant transformation, whereas the corresponding interaction with long HA imposes on the fibroblasts a resistance to malignant transformation. The article does not explain the mechanism that underlines these findings. However, the articles, that will be published in the proposed Research Topic in the Inflammation section of Frontiers in Immunology, can bridge not only this gap, but also may explain why interaction between short HA and cell surface CD44 (or RHAMM, an additional HA receptor) enhances the development of inflammatory and malignant diseases. Furthermore, the articles included in the proposed Frontiers Research Topic will show that cancer cells and inflammatory cells share several properties related to the interaction between short HA and cell surface CD44 and/or RHAMM. These shared properties include: 1. Support of cell migration, which allows tumor metastasis and accumulation of inflammatory cells at the inflammation site; 2. Delivery of intracellular signaling, which leads to cell survival of either cancer cells or inflammatory cells; 3. Delivery of intracellular signaling, which activates cell replication and population expansion of either cancer cells or inflammatory cells; and 4. Binding of growth factors to cell surface CD44 of cancer cells or inflammatory cells (i.e., the growth factors) and their presentation to cells with cognate receptors (endothelial cells, fibroblasts), leading to pro-malignant or pro-inflammatory activities. Going back to the naked mole rat story, we may conclude from the proposed articles of this Frontiers Research Topic that the long HA, which displays anti-malignant effect, interferes with the above described pro-malignant potential of the short HA (perhaps by competing on the same CD44 receptor). Extrapolating this concept to Inflammation, the same mechanism (competition?) may be valid for inflammatory (and autoimmune) activities. If this is the case, long HA may be used for therapy of both malignant and inflammatory diseases. Moreover, targeting the interaction between short HA and CD44 (e.g. by anti-CD44 blocking antibodies) may display also a therapeutic effect on both malignant and inflammatory diseases, an issue that encourages not only fruitful exchange of views, but also practical experimental collaboration.

Carbohydrates: The yet to be tasted sweet spot of immunity

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889196258 Year: Pages: 93 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-625-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-16 10:34:25
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Carbohydrates are extremely abundant bio-molecules; they are on all mammalian cell surfaces as well as on bacterial cell surfaces. In mammals most secreted proteins are glycosylated, with the glycan component comprising a significant amount by mass of the glycoprotein. Although, many years ago carbohydrate-protein recognition events were demonstrated as involved in invertebrate self-non self recognition, the contribution of carbohydrate-protein binding events to the mechanisms of the mammalian immune response was not embraced with the same enthusiasm. Adaptive immunity and the contribution of antibodies, T cells and T-lymphocyte sub-sets and protein antigen presentation dominated immunological theory. Unlike protein structures, carbohydrate structures are not template driven yet the numerous enzymes involved in carbohydrate biosynthesis and modification are encoded by a major component of the genome, and the expression of these enzymes is tightly regulated. As a consequence carbohydrate structures are also regulated, with different structures appearing according to the stage of cell differentiation and according to the age or health of the individual. The advent of technologies that have allowed carbohydrate structures and carbohydrate-protein binding events to be more easily interrogated has resulted in these types of interactions taking their place in modern immunology. We now know that glycans and their ligands (or lectins) are involved in numerous immunological pathways of both the innate and adaptive systems. However, it is clear that our understanding is still in its infancy, as more and more examples where carbohydrate structures contribute to aspects of the immune response are being recognised. The goal of this research topic is to explore the variety of roles undertaken by glycans and lectins in all aspects of the immune response. The particular focus is how the interactions of glycans with their ligands contribute to the mechanism of immune responses.

Intrinsically Biocompatible Polymer Systems

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ISBN: 9783039284207 9783039284214 Year: Pages: 270 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03928-421-4 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Technology (General) --- General and Civil Engineering --- Materials
Added to DOAB on : 2020-04-07 23:07:09
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Biocompatibility refers to the ability of a biomaterial to perform its desired function with respect to a medical therapy, without eliciting any undesirable local or systemic effects in the recipient or beneficiary of that therapy, but generating the most appropriate beneficial cellular or tissue response in that specific situation, and optimizing the clinically relevant performance of that therapy, which reflects current developments in the area of intrinsically biocompatible polymer systems. Polymeric biomaterials are presently used as, for example, long-term implantable medical devices, degradable implantable systems, transient invasive intravascular devices, and, recently, as tissue engineering scaffolds. This Special Issue welcomes full papers and short communications highlighting the aspects of the current trends in the area of intrinsically biocompatible polymer systems.

Keywords

antimicrobial peptides --- biodegradable polymers --- biocompatible polymers --- drug delivery systems --- controlled release --- citropin --- temporin --- ionic liquids --- chitooligosaccharide --- polyurethane --- biodegradability --- physicochemical properties --- hemocompatibility --- biological activity --- crosslinking --- drug delivery --- cosmetic --- food-supplement --- functionalization --- hyaluronan applications --- hyaluronan derivatives --- hyaluronan synthases --- hyaluronic acid --- hyaluronidases --- physico-chemical properties --- cyclohexanone --- ?-butyrolactone --- chloroform --- extraction --- polyhydroxyalkanoates --- PHB --- electrospraying --- biodegradable nano/microparticles --- drug delivery --- septic arthritis --- release characteristics --- biopolymers --- silk fibroin --- konjac glucomannan --- porous beads --- scaffolds --- tissue engineering --- microcarriers --- Poly (l-lactic) acid --- Chitosan --- nanohydroxyapatite --- osteoblasts --- ion-releasing materials --- shrinkage stress --- water sorption --- hydroscopic expansion --- photoelastic investigation --- enzymatic polymerization --- chemical polymerization --- poly(benzyl malate) --- biocompatible nanoparticles --- cell uptake --- cytotoxicity --- HepaRG cells --- human macrophages --- star polymers --- solution behavior --- ATRP --- SPION --- contrast agent --- MRI --- cancer diagnosis --- folate receptor --- pluronic F127 --- polylactide --- hydrolytic degradation --- mechanical properties --- PEEK copolymer synthesis --- PEEK composite --- Spine cage application --- In vitro biosafety --- degradation --- saliva --- mechanical properties --- molecular weight --- thermal properties --- activation energy of thermal decomposition --- anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction --- bone tunnel enlargement --- X-ray microtomography --- polylactide --- n/a

Self-Organizing Nanovectors for Drug Delivery

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ISBN: 9783039284283 / 9783039284290 Year: Pages: 186 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03928-429-0 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Therapeutics
Added to DOAB on : 2020-06-09 16:38:57
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Nanomedicine represents one of the most investigated areas in the last two decades in the field of pharmaceutics. Several nanovectors have been developed and a growing number of products have been approved. It is well known that many biomaterials are able to self-organize under controlled conditions giving rise nanostructures. Polymers, lipids, inorganic materials, peptides and proteins, and surfactants are examples of such biomaterials and the self-assembling property can be exploited to design nanovectors that are useful for drug delivery. The self-organization of nanostructures is an attractive approach to preparing nanovectors, avoiding complex and high-energy-consuming preparation methods, and, in some cases, facilitating drug loading procedures. Moreover, preparations based on these biocompatible and pharmaceutical grade biomaterials allow an easy transfer from the lab to the industrial scale. This book reports ten different works, and a review, aiming to cover multiple strategies and pharmaceutical applications in the field of self-organizing nanovectors for drug delivery.

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