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Ecosystemic Evolution Feeded by Smart Systems

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ISBN: 9783038428299 9783038428305 Year: Pages: VI, 170 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Computer Science
Added to DOAB on : 2018-04-13 13:08:42
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Abstract

Information Society is advancing along a route of ecosystemic evolution. ICT and Internet advancements, together with the progression of the systemic approach for enhancement and application of Smart Systems, are grounding such an evolution. The needed approach is therefore expected to evolve by increasingly fitting into the basic requirements of a significant general enhancement of human and social well-being, within all spheres of life (public, private, professional). This implies enhancing and exploiting the net-living virtual space, to make it a virtuous beneficial integration of the real-life space. Meanwhile, contextual evolution of smart cities is aiming at strongly empowering that ecosystemic approach by enhancing and diffusing net-living benefits over our own lived territory, while also incisively targeting a new stable socio-economic local development, according to social, ecological, and economic sustainability requirements. This territorial focus matches with a new glocal vision, which enables a more effective diffusion of benefits in terms of well-being, thus moderating the current global vision primarily fed by a global-scale market development view.Basic technological advancements have thus to be pursued at the system-level. They include system architecting for virtualization of functions, data integration and sharing, flexible basic service composition, and end-service personalization viability, for the operation and interoperation of smart systems, supporting effective net-living advancements in all application fields. Increasing and basically mandatory importance must also be increasingly reserved for human–technical and social–technical factors, as well as to the associated need of empowering the cross-disciplinary approach for related research and innovation. The prospected eco-systemic impact also implies a social pro-active participation, as well as coping with possible negative effects of net-living in terms of social exclusion and isolation, which require incisive actions for a conformal socio-cultural development. In this concern, speed, continuity, and expected long-term duration of innovation processes, pushed by basic technological advancements, make ecosystemic requirements stricter. This evolution requires also a new approach, targeting development of the needed basic and vocational education for net-living, which is to be considered as an engine for the development of the related ‘new living know-how’, as well as of the conformal ‘new making know-how’.

Landscape Urbanism and Green Infrastructure

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ISBN: 9783039213696 / 9783039213702 Year: Pages: 184 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-370-2 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Environmental Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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This volume examines the applicability of landscape urbanism theory in contemporary landscape architecture practice by bringing together ecology and architecture in the built environment. Using participatory planning of green infrastructure and application of nature-based solutions to address urban challenges, landscape urbanism seeks to reintroduce critical connections between natural and urban systems. In light of ongoing developments in landscape architecture, the goal is a paradigm shift towards a landscape that restores and rehabilitates urban ecosystems. Nine contributions examine a wide range of successful cases of designing livable and resilient cities in different geographical contexts, from the United States of America to Australia and Japan, and through several European cities in Italy, Portugal, Estonia, and Greece. While some chapters attempt to conceptualize the interconnections between cities and nature, others clearly have an empirical focus. Efforts such as the use of ornamental helophyte plants in bioretention ponds to reduce and treat stormwater runoff, the recovery of a poorly constructed urban waterway or participatory approaches for optimizing the location of green stormwater infrastructure and examining the environmental justice issue of equative availability and accessibility to public open spaces make these innovations explicit. Thus, this volume contributes to the sustainable cities goal of the United Nations.

Keywords

pedestrian zones --- well-being --- viable city --- residents’ views --- green infrastructure --- Greece --- biophilic urbanism --- vacant land --- street verges --- spontaneous vegetation --- postal questionnaire --- Asia --- Japan --- recreation --- urban sustainability --- landscape urbanism --- green gentrification --- Soviet-era housing blocks --- deprived areas --- Roma minority --- built environment --- urban design --- regenerative design --- sustainable development --- river restoration --- biophilic urbanism --- green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) --- social equity --- site suitability modeling --- geographic information systems --- environmental justice --- urban planning --- Philadelphia --- urban design --- landscape first --- post-postmodernism --- landscape history --- urban ecology --- plant ecology --- context-sensitive design --- landscape theory --- urban geography --- nature-based solution --- floating treatment wetland --- pollutant removal --- runoff --- biophilic design --- green infrastructure --- Importance-Performance Analysis (IPA) --- public open space --- re-naturing cities --- urban nature --- visitor satisfaction survey --- resource rationalization --- biophilic design --- public amenity --- public green infrastructure (PGI) --- public open space --- renaturing cities --- sustainable development --- livability --- liveability --- urban nature (UN) --- well-being --- built environment --- nature-based solutions --- sustainable cities --- biophilic design --- urban planning --- landscape architecture --- environmental justice --- public perception --- well-being

Walkable Neighborhoods: The Link between Public Health, Urban Design, and Transportation

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ISBN: 9783039219308 / 9783039219315 Year: Pages: 234 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-931-5 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Transportation --- Media and communication
Added to DOAB on : 2020-01-30 16:39:46
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It is now widely recognized that individual-based motivational interventions alone are not sufficient to address the global pandemic of physical inactivity (lack of exercise and too much sitting time). There has been a growing interest in the effect the physically built environment can have on people’s active behaviors. The fundamental assumption is that surrounding physical environments can support active behaviors among a large number of people with long-term effects. This topic has received much attention over the last decade, mainly in the three fields of urban design, public health, and transportation. This Special Issue aims to provide multidisciplinary and evidence-based state-of-the-art research on how the locations where people live impact their active behaviors and health outcomes.

Keywords

urban design --- active living --- aging --- physical activity --- sedentary behavior --- age-friendly environments --- older adult --- physical activity --- social connectedness --- physical environment --- citizen science --- Discovery Tool --- built environment --- urban health --- urban form --- walking --- physical activity --- health promotion --- walkability --- neighborhood --- older adult --- chronic diseases --- body mass --- disease mapping --- geographic variation --- obese --- overweight --- spatial analysis --- walkability --- traffic safety --- walking --- cycling --- infrastructure --- active travel --- active transport --- neighbourhood --- scale --- built environment --- physical activity --- walking --- soft mobility --- walkable environment --- physical activity --- health outcomes --- active living --- street network configuration --- peripheral neighbourhoods --- pedestrian flow --- streetscape features --- Istanbul --- walkable neighborhood --- sitting --- elderly --- built environment --- non-communicable diseases --- Africa --- walkable environment --- physical activity --- sedentary behaviour --- neighbourhood --- walkability --- active living --- survey --- questionnaire --- mobility management --- public transport --- step counts --- city planning --- compact city --- neighborhood --- natural experiment --- built environment --- urban design --- policy evaluation --- active living --- liveability --- Australia --- walkability --- environment --- overweight --- obesity --- review

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