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Computers and Games for Mental Health and Well-Being

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889454969 Year: Pages: 311 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-496-9 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Psychiatry --- Public Health
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:42
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Abstract

Recent years have seen important developments in the computer and game industry, including the emergence of the concept of serious games. It is hypothesized that tools such as games, virtual reality, or applications for smartphones may foster learning, enhance motivation, promote behavioral change, support psychotherapy, favor empowerment, and improve some cognitive functions. Computers and games may create supports for training or help people with cognitive, emotional, or behavioral change. Games take various formats, from board games to informatics to games with interactive rules of play. Similarly, computer tools may vary widely in format, from self-help or assisted computerized training to virtual reality or applications for smartphones. Some tools that may be helpful for mental health were specifically designed for that goal, whereas others were not. Gamification of computer-related products and games with a numeric format tend to reduce the gap between games and computers tools and increase the conceptual synergy in such fields. Games and computer design share an opportunity for creativity and innovation to help create, specifically design, and assess preventive or therapeutic tools. Computers and games share a design conception that allows innovative approaches to overcome barriers of the real world by creating their own rules. Yet, despite the potential interest in such tools to improve treatment of mental disorders and to help prevent them, the field remains understudied and information is under-disseminated in clinical practice. Some studies have shown, however, that there is potential interest and acceptability of tools that support various vehicles, rationales, objectives, and formats. These tools include traditional games (e.g., chess games), popular electronic games, board games, computer-based interventions specifically designed for psychotherapy or cognitive training, virtual reality, apps for smartphones, and so forth. Computers and games may offer a true opportunity to develop, assess, and disseminate new prevention and treatment tools for mental health and well-being. Currently, there is a strong need for state-of-the-art information to answer questions such as the following: Why develop such tools for mental health and well-being? What are the potential additions to traditional treatments? What are the best strategies or formats to improve the possible impact of these tools? Are such tools useful as a first treatment step? What is the potential of a hybrid model of care that combines traditional approaches with games and/or computers as tools? What games and applications have already been designed and studied? What is the evidence from previous studies? How can such tools be successfully designed for mental health and well-being? What is rewarding or attractive for patients in using such treatments? What are the worldwide developments in the field? Are some protocols under development? What are the barriers and challenges related to such developments? How can these tools be assessed, and how can the way that they work, and for whom, be measured? Are the potential benefits of such products specific, or can these additions be attributed to nonspecific factors? What are the users’ views on such tools? What are the possible links between such tools and social networks? Is there a gap between evidence-based results and market development? Are there any quality challenges? What future developments and studies are needed in the field?

New Research in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Major Depression

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783039210909 / 9783039210916 Year: Pages: 102 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-091-6 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Psychology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-26 08:44:07
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Major depression and obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) are now recognized among the most frequent psychiatric disorders, affecting 16–17% and 2–3% of the general population, respectively. They are commonly characterized by: i) a high level of psychiatric and somatic comorbidities; ii) a recurrence or chronic profile; and iii) a negative impact on daily functions, thereby leading to a profound impairment of quality of life. Despite significant advances in pharmacological and psychological therapies over the last decades, unsuccessful responses to standard treatment strategies are classically observed in approximately 20–30% of cases. Therefore, there is a significant need for improving the pathophysiological knowledge through a better identification of environmental, clinical, psychological, genetic, anatomical, and biological determinants, specifically implied in the development, the phenotypic expression, and the relapsing course and/or contributing to the therapeutic failure in major depression and OCD. We are convinced that this research approach is particularly relevant providing critical support for the promotion of innovative treatment alternatives potentially useful for the management of resistant forms of major depression and OCD.

Refugee, Migrant and Ethnic Minority Health

Authors: --- --- ---
ISBN: 9783039216444 / 9783039216451 Year: Pages: 526 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-645-1 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Social Sciences --- Sociology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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International migration, particularly to Europe, has increased in the last few decades, making research on aspects of this phenomenon, including numbers, challenges, and successes, particularly vital. This Special Issue highlights this necessary and relevant area of research. It presents 37 articles including studies on diverse topics relating to the health of refugees and migrants. Most articles (28) present studies focusing on European host countries. The focus on Europe is justified if we take into consideration the increased number of refugees and migrants who have come to Europe in recent years. However, there are also articles which present studies from countries in other continents. The topics discussed in the Issue include healthcare utilization, infectious diseases, mother and child health, mental health, and chronic diseases. Finding from the included articles indicate that further development of guidelines and policies at both local and international levels is needed. Priorities must be set by encouraging and funding in-depth research that aims to evaluate the impact of existing policies and interventions. Such research will help us formulate recommendations for the development of strategies and approaches that improve and strengthen the integration of migrants and refugees into the host countries.

Keywords

breastfeeding --- complementary feeding --- Chinese --- immigrant mothers --- infant --- obesity --- post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) --- pain --- pain perception --- understanding of illness --- culture --- family-oriented societies --- refugee and migrant women --- sexual and reproductive health --- training --- knowledge --- confidence --- health care professionals --- emergency care --- triage --- healthcare system strengthening --- migrant health --- North Korean refugees --- depression --- early trauma --- negative automatic thoughts --- path analysis --- ambulance --- economic recession --- emergency medical service --- Greece --- primary healthcare system --- refugee --- triage --- public health --- asylum seeker --- Electronic Health Insurance Card --- refugee --- Germany --- refugee health --- asylum seekers --- migrants --- infectious diseases --- vaccination --- Italy --- refugee and migrant (R&M) health --- refugee crisis --- healthcare --- European Union (EU) --- migrant health --- preparedness --- communicable diseases --- tuberculosis --- LTBI --- refugee --- asylum --- infection --- IGRA --- infectious diseases --- migrant --- asylum seekers --- psychiatric emergency services --- involuntary treatment --- psychiatric hospitalization --- migrants --- sexual health --- help-seeking behavior --- systematic review --- aggression --- emergency department --- workplace violence --- migrants --- failed asylum seekers --- psychiatric emergency services --- psychiatric hospitalisation --- acute stress --- multidimensional intercultural training acculturation model (MITA) --- intercultural competence --- traumatic events --- mental health --- Middle Eastern refugee adolescents --- migration --- health --- infection --- linkage --- care --- sexual and reproductive health --- adolescent --- refugee --- migrant --- young women --- knowledge --- access --- experiences --- systematic review --- Africa --- obesity --- immigration --- education --- inequalities --- health survey --- refugee --- adolescent --- risk factor --- protective factor --- HIV --- AIDS --- stigma --- refugees --- migrants --- economic crisis --- Greece --- migration --- National Health System --- refugee --- Southeast Europe --- immigrant --- healthcare --- HBV --- CHB --- screening --- vaccination --- refugees --- migrants --- pregnancy --- migration --- refugees --- health care provision --- reception center --- sexual violence --- migrants --- refugees --- asylum seekers --- applicants for international protection --- Europe --- prevalence --- hepatitis C --- screening --- migrants --- viral hepatitis elimination --- European Union --- North African --- immigration --- health care --- emergency department --- disparities --- VPD --- immunisation strategies --- health systems --- refugees --- migrants --- cost effectiveness --- healthcare --- migration --- refugee --- asylum seeker --- medical service --- migrant --- medical care --- doctor --- Europe --- Germany --- fruit --- vegetable --- immigrant --- Portuguese --- health --- refugees women --- HIV --- mental health --- stigma --- discrimination --- access to care --- disease prevention --- public health --- stigma --- refugees --- migrants --- MMR vaccination --- measles --- vaccine hesitancy --- autism --- Rinkeby --- Tensta --- immigrants --- Polish --- religiosity --- lifestyle behavior --- smoking --- alcohol consumption --- physical activity --- overweight --- obesity --- migrant populations --- schistosomiasis/schistosoma --- strongyloidiasis/strongyloides --- screening/diagnosis --- treatment --- public health --- GRADE --- refugee --- health --- migration --- chronic disease --- infectious disease --- n/a

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