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Signal Transduction in Stomatal Guard Cells

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889451678 Year: Pages: 105 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-167-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Botany --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-08-28 14:01:09
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Abstract

Stomata, the tiny pores on leaf surface, are the gateways for CO2 uptake during photosynthesis as well as water loss in transpiration. Further, plants use stomatal closure as a defensive response, often triggered by elicitors, to prevent the entry of pathogens. The guard cells are popular model systems to study the signalling mechanism in plant cells. The messengers that mediate closure upon perception of elicitors or microbe associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) are quite similar to those during ABA effects. These components include reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), cytosolic pH and intracellular Ca2+. The main components are ROS, NO and cytosolic free Ca2+. The list extends to others, such as G-proteins, protein phosphatases, protein kinases, phospholipids and ion channels. The sequence of these signalling components and their interaction during stomatal signalling are complex and quite interesting. The present e-Book provides a set of authoritative articles from ‘Special Research Topic’ on selected areas of stomatal guard cells. In the first set of two articles, an overview of ABA and MAMPs as signals is presented. The next set of 4 articles, emphasize the role of ROS, NO, Ca2+ as well as pH, as secondary messengers. The next group of 3 articles highlight the recent advances on post-translational modification of guard cell proteins, with emphasis on 14-3-3 proteins and MAPK cascades. The last article described the method to isolate epidermis of grass species and monitor stomatal responses to different signals. Our e-Book is a valuable and excellent source of information for all those interested in guard cell function as well as signal transduction in plant cells.

Jasmonic Acid Pathway in Plants

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ISBN: 9783039284887 / 9783039284894 Year: Pages: 346 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03928-489-4 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Plant Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2020-06-09 16:38:57
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Abstract

The plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivative, an amino acid conjugate of JA (jasmonoyl isoleucine, JA-Ile), are signaling compounds involved in the regulation of defense and development in plants. The number of articles studying on JA has dramatically increased since the 1990s. JA is recognized as a stress hormone that regulates the plant response to biotic stresses such as herbivore and pathogen attacks, as well as abiotic stresses such as wounding and ultraviolet radiation. Recent studies have remarkably progressed the understanding of the importance of JA in the life cycle of plants. JA is directly involved in many physiological processes, including stamen growth, senescence, and root growth. JA regulates production of various metabolites such as phytoalexins and terpenoids. Many regulatory proteins involved in JA signaling have been identified by screening for Arabidopsis mutants. However, much more remains to be learned about JA signaling in other plant species. This Special Issue, “Jasmonic Acid Pathway in Plants”, contains 5 review and 15 research articles published by field experts. These articles will help with understanding the crucial roles of JA in its response to the several environmental stresses and development in plants.

Keywords

albino --- aroma --- Camellia sinensis --- chloroplast --- jasmonic acid --- light-sensitive --- stress --- tea --- volatile --- Panax ginseng --- gene expression --- ginsenoside --- methyl jasmonate --- MYB transcription factor --- dammarenediol synthase --- jasmonic acid --- signaling pathway --- environmental response --- biological function --- MeJA --- priming --- rice --- proteomics --- ROS --- chlorophyll fluorescence imaging --- MAP kinase --- jasmonate --- rice bacterial blight --- salicylic acid --- grain development --- Prunus avium --- Tuscan varieties --- jasmonic acid --- lipoxygenase --- bioinformatics --- gene expression --- heterotrimeric G proteins --- AtRGS1 --- jasmonates --- endocytosis --- diffusion dynamics --- Chinese flowering cabbage --- leaf senescence --- JA --- transcriptional activation --- adventitious rooting --- auxin --- ectopic metaxylem --- ectopic protoxylem --- ethylene --- hypocotyl --- jasmonates --- nitric oxide --- xylogenesis --- transcriptional regulators --- plant development --- jasmonic acid signaling --- gene expression --- Jasmonate-ZIM domain --- JAZ repressors --- Jas domain --- TIFY --- degron --- phylogenetic analysis --- ancestral sequences --- circadian clock --- jasmonic acid --- crosstalk --- jasmonic acid --- fatty acid desaturase --- multiseeded --- msd --- grain number --- MutMap --- sorghum --- Ralstonia solanacearum --- type III effector --- jasmonic acid --- salicylic acid --- Nicotiana plants --- PatJAZ6 --- jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway --- Pogostemon cablin --- patchouli alcohol --- biosynthesis --- jasmonate --- salt response --- Zea mays --- ROS --- proline --- ABA biosynthesis --- jasmonic acid --- crosstalk --- gibberellic acid --- cytokinin --- auxin --- jasmonic acid --- opr3 --- stress defense --- quantitative proteomics --- abiotic stresses --- jasmonates --- JA-Ile --- JAZ repressors --- transcription factor --- signaling --- antioxidant enzyme activity --- elicitor --- methyl jasmonate --- secondary metabolite --- signal molecules --- n/a

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