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Glial Cells: Managers of Neuro-immunity

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889198351 Year: Pages: 224 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-835-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Immune responses within the brain are still scarcely explored. Nerve tissue damage is accompanied by the activation of glial cells, primarily microglia and astroglia, and such activation is responsible for the release of cytokines and chemokines that maintain the local inflammatory response and actively recruit lymphocytes and monocytes to the damaged areas. Theoretically, these responses are designed to repair the brain damage. However, alterations, or a chronic perpetuation of these responses may underlie a number of neuro-pathologies. It is thought that each inflammatory scenario within the brain have a specific biochemical footprint characterized by the release of determined cytokines, chemokines and growing factors able to define particular immunological responses. Alongside, glial cells transform their cell body, become larger and develop higher number of branches adopting an active morphological phenotype. These changes are related with the search of interactions with other cells, such as bystander resident cells of the brain parenchyma, but also cells homing from the blood stream. In this process, microglia and astrocytes communicates with other cells by the formation of specific intercellular connections that are still poorly understood. These interactions are complex and entail the arrangement of cytoskeletal compounds, secretory and phagocytic domains. In this particular crosstalk there is a two-way communication in which glial cells and target cells come together establishing interfaces with specific information exchange. This way, glial cells orchestrate the particular response recruiting cellular subsets within the central nervous system and organizing the resolution of the brain damage. In this Frontiers Research Topic, we compile a selection of articles unfolding diverse aspects of glial-derived inflammation, focused on neurodegenerative diseases and other nervous system disorders, with special emphasis on microglia/macrophages as leading actors managing neuro-immunity.

Potential Neuromodulatory Profile of Phytocompounds in Brain Disorders

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ISBN: 9783038423171 9783038423164 Year: Pages: VIII, 212 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03842-317-1 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Chemistry (General) --- Therapeutics
Added to DOAB on : 2017-02-20 08:45:35
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Natural and chemical compounds, often used as both dietary supplements and alternative medicines, are characterized by specific chemical properties, allowing their passage across the blood brain barrier with consequent specific effects on neurotransmission. In particular, several natural compounds have shown beneficial properties in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders, especially cognitive impairment and mood disorders, contributing to the maintenance of the physiological brain functioning by interacting with different receptors, transcription factors and signal transduction pathways. Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress have also been proposed as crucial contributors to brain dysfunction development, thus recent investigations have focused on novel therapeutic approaches based on the use of phytoderivates with neuroprotective properties. Thus, this Special Issue includes a collection of 11 papers, describing key findings for the identification of molecular mechanisms required for the development of potential and promising natural therapeutics for the treatment of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders.

Cellular and molecular mechanisms of motor neuron death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889193769 Year: Pages: 190 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-376-9 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-11-19 16:29:12
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Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which was described since 1869 by Jean Martin Charcot, is a devastating neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and progressive loss of upper and lower motor neurons of the cerebral cortex, brainstem and the spinal cord. The cognitive process is not affected and is not merely the result of aging because may occur at young ages. The only known cause of the disease is associated with genetic mutations, mainly in the gene encoding superoxide dismutase 1 (familial ALS), whereas there is no known cause of the sporadic form of ALS (SALS), which comprises >90% of cases. Both ALS types develop similar histopathological and clinical characteristics, and there is no treatment or prevention of the disease. Because effective treatments for ALS, as for other neurodegenerative diseases, can only result from the knowledge of their cellular and molecular pathophysiological mechanisms, research on such mechanisms is essential. Although progress in neurochemical, physiological and clinical investigations in the last decades has identified several mechanisms that seem to be involved in the cell death process, such as glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity, alterations of inhibitory circuits, inflammatory events, axonal transport deficits, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and energy failure, the understanding of the origin and temporal progress of the disease is still incomplete and insufficient. Clearly, there is a need of further experimental models and approaches to discern the importance of such mechanisms and to discover the factors that determine the selective death of motor neurons characteristic of ALS, in contrast to other neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease. Whereas studies in vitro in cell cultures, tissue slices or organotypic preparations can give useful information regarding cellular and molecular mechanisms, the experiments in living animal models obviously reflect more closely the situation in the human disease, provided that the symptoms and their development during time mimics as close as possible those of the human disease. It is necessary to correlate the experimental findings in vitro with those in vivo, as well as those obtained in genetic models with those in non-genetic models, aiming at designing and testing therapeutic strategies based on the results obtained.

Mechanisms of neuroinflammation and inflammatory neurodegeneration in acute brain injury

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889196913 Year: Pages: 284 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-691-3 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-07 11:22:02
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Mechanisms of brain-immune interactions became a cutting-edge topic in systemic neurosciences over the past years. Acute lesions of the brain parenchyma, particularly, induce a profound and highly complex neuroinflammatory reaction with similar mechanistic properties between differing disease paradigms like ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Resident microglial cells sense tissue damage and initiate inflammation, activation of the endothelial brain-immune interface promotes recruitment of systemic immune cells to the brain and systemic humoral immune mediators (e.g. complements and cytokines) enter the brain through the damaged blood-brain barrier. These cellular and humoral constituents of the neuroinflammatory reaction to brain injury contribute substantially to secondary brain damage and neurodegeneration. Diverse inflammatory cascades such as pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion of invading leukocytes and direct cell-cell-contact cytotoxicity between lymphocytes and neurons have been demonstrated to mediate the inflammatory ‘collateral damage’ in models of acute brain injury. Besides mediating neuronal cell loss and degeneration, secondary inflammatory mechanisms also contribute to functional modulation of neurons and the impact of post-lesional neuroinflammation can even be detected on the behavioral level. The contribution of several specific immune cell subpopulations to the complex orchestration of secondary neuroinflammation has been revealed just recently. However, the differential vulnerability of specific neuronal cell types and the molecular mechanisms of inflammatory neurodegeneration are still elusive. Furthermore, we are only on the verge of characterizing the control of long-term recovery and neuronal plasticity after brain damage by inflammatory pathways. Yet, a more detailed but also comprehensive understanding of the multifaceted interaction of these two supersystems is of direct translational relevance. Immunotherapeutic strategies currently shift to the center of translational research in acute CNS lesion since all clinical trials investigating direct neuroprotective therapies failed. To advance our knowledge on brain-immune communications after brain damage an interdisciplinary approach covered by cellular neuroscience as well as neuroimmunology, brain imaging and behavioral sciences is crucial to thoroughly depict the intricate mechanisms.

Neuroinflammation and Behaviour

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889196029 Year: Pages: 181 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-602-9 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Neurology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-16 10:34:25
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The brain and immune system are involved in an intricate network of bidirectional communication. This relationship is vital for optimal physiological and psychological development and functioning but can also result in unwanted outcomes. In particular, this interaction plays an important role in cognition, mood and behaviour. Neuroinflammation is known to contribute to neurological and affective disorders including impaired learning and memory, depressive, anxiety and schizoaffective symptoms, as well as pain. The development of these conditions often occurs on the backdrop of pre-existing physical illnesses which give rise to increased activation of the immune system, such as cancer, obesity, infection and autoimmune disorders. Similarly, psychological states can alter regulation of the immune system. This has been most extensively studied in the context of stress and immune function. Understanding the underlying mechanisms that lead to the onset of inflammation-induced neuropathology and stress-induced immune suppression will contribute to the development of novel and effective treatment strategies for both the disease and its neurological side effects. In this research topic we explored the relationship between the immune system and the brain throughout life. We include both original research and review papers from animal, clinical and molecular perspectives.

The Metabolic-Inflammatory Axis in Brain Aging and Neurodegeneration

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889452538 Year: Pages: 161 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-253-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Neurology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-02-27 16:16:44
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Impairment of energy metabolism is a hallmark of brain aging and several neurodegenerative diseases, such as the Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Age- and disease-related hypometabolism is commonly associated with oxidative stress and they are both regarded as major contributors to the decline in synaptic plasticity and cognition. Neuroinflammatory changes, entailing microglial activation and elevated expression of inflammatory cytokines, also correlate with age-related cognitive decline. It is still under debate whether the mitochondrial dysfunction-induced metabolic deficits or the microglia activation-mediated neuroinflammation is the initiator of the cognitive changes in aging and AD. Nevertheless, multiple lines of evidence support the notion that mitochondrial dysfunction and chronic inflammation exacerbate each other, and these mechanistic diversities have cellular redox dysregulation as a common denominator. This research topic focuses on the role of a metabolic-inflammatory axis encompassing the bioenergetic activity, brain inflammatory responses and their redox regulation in healthy brain aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Dynamic interactions among these systems are reviewed in terms of their causative or in-tandem occurrence and how the systemic environment, –e.g., insulin resistance, diabetes, and systemic inflammation–, impacts on brain function.

Ubiquitin and the Brain: Roles of Proteolysis in the Normal and Abnormal Nervous System

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889452859 Year: Pages: 241 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-285-9 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Neurology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-02-27 16:16:44
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Proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) in the nervous system has been extensively studied both in the context of normal physiological function as well as abnormal pathological conditions. Although ubiquitin was used as a marker of brain pathology, the normal functions of the UPP were not studied much in the nervous system until the 1990s. The early investigations focused on synaptic plasticity which was followed by studies on the roles of protein degradation in the development of the nervous system. Research on the role of abnormal roles of the UPP follows a parallel trajectory. Since the 2000s, the field has grown to encompass many subareas of research and several model systems. Despite the progress made, many unanswered questions still remain. For example, there are many unknowns about the precise spatial and temporal control of protein degradation in the normal nervous system. With respect to the roles of proteolysis in brain pathology a major challenge is to elucidate the connection between impaired protein degradation and disease progression. In addition, in-depth studies of the roles of ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated proteolysis in neurodegenerative diseases are promising in identifying therapeutic targets. This ebook contains original research papers and insightful reviews that cover several aspects of proteolysis by the UPP and its physiological as well as pathological functions in the nervous system.

Neuroimmune Interface in Health and Diseases

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889453788 Year: Pages: 174 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-378-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology --- Neurology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-11-16 17:17:57
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It is now well appreciated that the immune system, in addition to its traditional role in defending the organism against pathogens, communicate in a well-organized fashion with the brain to maintain homeostasis and regulate a set of neural functions. Perturbation in this brain-immune interactions due to inflammatory responses may lead to psychiatric and neurological disorders. Microglia are one of the essential cells involved in the brain-immune interactions. Microglial cells are now not simply regarded as resident tissue macrophages in the brain. These cells are derived from myeloid progenitor cells in the yolk sac in early gestation, travel to the brain parenchyma and interact actively with neurons during the critical period of neurogenesis. Microglia provide a trophic support to developing neurons and take part in the neural wiring through the activity-dependent synapse elimination via direct neuron-microglia interactions. Altered microglial functions including changes in the gene expression due to early life inflammatory events or psychological and environmental stressors can be causally related to neurodevelopmental diseases and mental health disorders. This type of alterations in the neural functions can occur in the absence of infiltration of inflammatory cells in the brain parenchyma or leptomeninges. In this sense, the pathogenetic state underlying a significant part of psychiatric and neurological diseases may be similar to “para-inflammation”, an intermediate state between homeostatic and classical inflammatory states as defined by Ruslan Medzhitov (Nature 454:428-35, 2008). Therefore, it is important to study how systemic inflammation affects brain health and how local peripheral inflammation induces changes in the brain microenvironment. Chronic pain is also induced by disturbance in otherwise well-organized multisystem interplay comprising of reciprocal neural, endocrine and immune interactions. Especially, early-life insults including exposure to immune challenges can alter the neuroanatomical components of nociception, which induces altered pain response later in life. Recently the discrete roles of microglia and blood monocyte-derived macrophages are being defined. The distinction may be further highlighted by disorders in which the brain parenchymal tissue is damaged. Therefore, studies investigating the dynamics of immune cells in traumatic brain injury and neurotropic viral infections including human immunodeficiency virus, etc. as well as neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are promising to clarify the interplay between the central nervous and immune systems. The understanding of the histological architecture providing the infrastructure of such neuro-immune interplay is also essential. This Frontiers research topic brings together fourteen articles and aims to create a platform for researchers in the field of psychoneuroimmunology to share the recent theories, hypotheses and future perspectives regarding open questions on the mechanisms of cell-cell interactions with chemical mediators among the nervous, immune and endocrine systems. We hope that this platform would reveal the relevance of the studies on multisystem interactions to enhance the understanding of the mechanisms underlying a wide variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

Microglial Polarization in the Pathogenesis and Therapeutics of Neurodegenerative Diseases

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889455256 Year: Pages: 327 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-525-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Neurology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:42
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Microglia-mediated neuroinflammation is one of the shared prominent hallmarks among various forms of neurodegeneration. Depending on the milieu in which microglia become activated, the polarization of microglia shows to be heterogeneous with diverse functional phenotypes that range from pro-inflammatory phenotypes to immunosuppressive phenotypes. Therefore, targeting microglial polarization holds great promise for the treatment of neurodegeneration.This eBook focuses on the potential mechanisms of microglial polarization that are critically associated with a broad spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease (PD), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington’s disease (HD), Traumatic brain injury (TBI), glaucomatous neurodegeneration and prion diseases. This topic also involves the therapeutic targeting of microglial polarization by nutritional and pharmacological modulators. Moreover, this topic describes advanced technologies employed for studying microglia. Age-related changes in microglia functions are also discussed.Overall, this eBook provides comprehensive understandings of microglial polarization in the course of neurodegeneration, linking with aging-related microglial alterations and technologies developed for microglial studies. Hopefully, it will also give comprehensive insights into various aspects of therapeutic treatment for neurodegeneration, through targeting microglial polarization.

Cerebral endothelial and glial cells are more than bricks in the Great Wall of the brain: Insights into the way the blood-brain barrier actually works (Celebrating the centenary of Goldman's experiments)

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889195725 Year: Pages: 186 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-572-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-02-05 17:24:33
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When Ehrlich discovered the first evidence of the blood-brain barrier in 1885, he probably did not perceive the Great Wall that remained hidden from consciousness inside the central nervous system. Ehrlich had observed that acidic vital dyes did not stain the brain if they were injected into the blood stream. A century ago (1913), Goldman showed that the injection of trypan blue in the cerebrospinal fluid stained only the brain, but not the other organs. For almost a century it was thought that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) consisted in a physical barrier, resulting from the restricted permeability of the cerebral endothelial cell layer, as they are joined by tight junctions. However, as scientists are always looking for news in what is already discovered, in the end of the 20th century we had evidences that cerebral endothelial and glial cells express several drug metabolizing enzymes consisting in a second protection system: a metabolic barrier. Furthermore, the drugs and their metabolites must overcome the activity of several multidrug resistance proteins that function as ATP-dependent efflux pumps, consisting in the third line of defence: the active barrier. Therefore, the way the BBB actually works should be better explained. Several endogenous compounds, as well as xenobiotics, may be activated by enzymes of the metabolic barrier, generating reactive oxygen species that could damage neurons. Therefore, endothelial and glial cells possess endogenous protecting compounds and enzymes against oxidants, consisting in an antioxidant barrier. When all these systems fail, glial cells, mainly microglia, secrete cytokines in an attempt to crosstalk with defence cells asking for help, which consists in an immune barrier. In cerebral regions that are devoid of the physical barrier, such as circumventricular organs, the metabolic, active, antioxidant and immune barriers are reinforced. It is important to understand how cells involved in the BBB interact with one another and the dynamic mechanisms of their functions. This Research Topic published in this e-Book considers recent highlights in BBB structure, cell and molecular biology, biotransformation, physiology, pathology, pharmacology, immunology and how these basic knowledges can be applied in drug discovery and clinical researches, rewriting what is already written, and paving the way that goes to the Great Wall in the Frontiers of the Brain in this new century that is just beginning.

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