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Meaningful Flesh: Reflections on Religion and Nature for a Queer Planet

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ISBN: 9781947447325 9781947447332 Year: Pages: 152 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0194.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Social Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:31
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Religion is much queerer than we ever imagined. Nature is as well. These are the two basic insights that have led to this volume: the authors included here hope to queerly go where no thinkers have gone before. The combination of queer theory and religion has been happening for at least 25 years. People such as John Boswell began to examine the history of religious traditions with a queer eye, and soon after we had the indecent theology of Marcella Althaus Ried. Jay Johnston, one of the authors in this issue, is among those who have used the queer eye to interrogate authority within Christian theological traditions. At the same time, there have been many queer interrogations of “nature,” perhaps most notably in the works of Joan Roughgarden and Ann Fausto-Sterling, and more recently in the works of Catriona Sandilands and Timothy Morton (an author in this volume). However, the intersections of religion, nature, and queer theory have been largely left untouched. With the exception of Dan Spencer, who writes the introduction for this volume and is one of the early pioneers in this realm of thought with his book Gay and Gaia (Pilgrim Press, 1996), and the work of Greta Gaard in developing a queer ecofeminist thought, religion and nature, or religion and ecology, have largely ignored the realm of queer theory. In part, the blinders to queer theory on the part of eco-thinkers (religious or otherwise) are similar to the blinders eco-thinkers have when it comes to postmodern thought in general: namely, if there are no absolute foundations, how does one create an environmental ethic and a “nature” to save? For this reason and many others, this volume on religion, nature, and queer theory is groundbreaking. Though these essays span many different disciplines and themes, they are all held together by the triple focus on religion, nature, and queer theory. Each of these essays offers a unique contribution to the intersection of religion, nature, and queer theory, and all of them challenge strict boundaries proposed in religious rhetoric and many discourses surrounding “nature.” Carol Wayne White’s essay draws from a queer reading of James Baldwin to develop an African American religious naturalism, which highlights humans as polyamorous bastards. Jacob Erickson’s essay examines Isabella Rossellini’s “Green Porno” and Martin Luther’s work to develop an irreverent theology. Jay Johnson draws from personal relationships with his late dog, and Master/Pup fetish-play, to blur the boundaries between humans and other animals, specifically within ethical and theological discourse. Whitney Bauman reflects on how the very processes of globalization and climate change queer our identities and call for a queer and versatile planetary ethic. Finally, Timothy Morton leads us through a reflection on queer green sex toys to challenge the ontology of agrologistics. Each of these essays in their own way is concerned with fleshing out more meaningful encounters with the planetary community. Without being too ambitious, we hope that these sets of essays will help to open up a new trajectory of conversations at the intersection of religion, nature, and queer theory.

After the "Speculative Turn": Realism, Philosophy, and Feminism

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ISBN: 9780998237534 Year: Pages: 200 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0152.1.00 Language: French|English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Gender Studies
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:35
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Recent forms of realism in continental philosophy that are habitually subsumed under the category of “speculative realism,” a denomination referring to rather heterogeneous strands of philosophy, bringing together object-oriented ontology (OOO), non-standard philosophy (or non-philosophy), the speculative realist ideas of Quentin Meillassoux and Marxism, have provided grounds for the much needed critique of culturalism in gender theory, and the authority with which post-structuralism has dominated feminist theory for decades. This publication aims to bring forth some of the feminist debates prompted by the so-called “speculative turn,” while demonstrating that there has never been a niche of “speculative realist feminism.” Whereas most of the contributions featured in this collection provide a theoretical approach invoking the necessity of foregrounding new forms of realism for a “feminism beyond gender as culture,” some of the essays tackle OOO only to invite a feminist critical challenge to its paradigm, while others refer to some extent to non-philosophy or the new materialisms but are not reducible to either of the two. We have invited essays from intellectual milieus outside the Anglo-Saxon academic center, bringing together authors from Serbia, Slovenia, France, Ireland, the UK, and Canada, aiming to promote feminist internationalism (rather than a “generous act of cultural inclusion”).

Inhuman Nature

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ISBN: 9780692299302 Year: Pages: 166 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0078.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Philosophy
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:40
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Gathering into lively conversation scholars in medieval, early modern and object studies, Inhuman Nature explores the activity of the things, forces, and relations that enable, sustain and operate indifferently to us. Enamored by fictions of environmental sovereignty, we too often imagine “human” to be a solitary category of being. This collection of essays maps the heterogeneous and asymmetrical ecologies within which we are enmeshed, a material world that makes the human possible but also offers difficulties and resistance. Among the topics explored are the futurity that inheres in storms and wrecks, wood that resists its burning or offers art and dwelling, hymns that implant themselves like viruses, the ontology of everyday objects, the seep and flow of substance, the resistant nature of matter, the dependence of community upon making things public, and the interstices at which nature and culture become inseparable. Tinker as you will.

Central Places and Un-Central Landscapes. Political Economies and Natural Resources in the Longue Durée

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ISBN: 9783038976783 Year: Pages: 314 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-679-0 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Archaeology --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-04-05 10:34:31
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Modern developments of Fourier analysis during the 20th century have explored generalizations of Fourier and Fourier–Plancherel formula for non-commutative harmonic analysis, applied to locally-compact, non-Abelian groups. In parallel, the theory of coherent states and wavelets has been generalized over Lie groups. One should add the developments, over the last 30 years, of the applications of harmonic analysis to the description of the fascinating world of aperiodic structures in condensed matter physics. The notions of model sets, introduced by Y. Meyer, and of almost periodic functions, have revealed themselves to be extremely fruitful in this domain of natural sciences.

Keywords

Cyprus --- Bronze Age --- site location --- resource procurement --- metals trade --- political economy --- connectivity --- central places --- central flow theory --- nodal points --- central place --- social networks --- landscape archaeology --- settlement location --- interaction --- hunting --- eschatia --- bird hunting --- landscape archaeology --- Populonia --- settlement organization --- supply basin --- central place --- hilltop fortresses --- liminal landscape --- connectivity --- viewshed analysis --- sacred areas --- South-Eastern Provence --- Marseille --- Arles --- centrality --- gateways --- ancient port cities --- trading mechanisms --- political economy --- Cyprus --- Bronze Age --- water --- materiality --- new materialisms --- entanglements --- assemblages --- networks --- central place theory --- Byzantine bath-houses --- medieval Crete --- Byzantine settlements of eastern Crete --- urban culture of Byzantium --- church architecture --- Secular Byzantine architecture --- Byzantine Mochlos --- Timacum Minus --- Moesia Superior --- central place theory --- centrality --- Roman urbanism --- settlement status --- Roman mining --- Cypriot archaeology --- Mediterranean archaeology --- landscape archaeology --- central places --- sacred space --- political power --- economy --- religion --- ideology --- ancient sanctuaries --- byzantine and medieval Peloponnese --- byzantine and medieval port towns --- central place theory --- networks --- economy --- trade links --- Cyprus --- Roman archaeology --- Roman imperialism --- island and coastal archaeology --- identity --- urbanism --- central place theory --- connectivity --- maritime cultural landscapes --- Cyprus --- landscape archaeology --- surface survey --- river valley --- settlement organisation --- aridity --- marginality --- landscape archaeology --- Marmarica (NW-Egypt) --- Hauran (Syria/Jordan) --- Graeco-Roman period --- spatial scales in networks --- network relationship qualities --- interaction --- resource management

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