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Chapter Three Defining Difference (Book chapter)

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Book Series: Rochester Studies in Medical History ISBN: 9781580465946 Year: Pages: 20 Language: English
Publisher: University of Rochester Press Grant: Wellcome Trust
Subject: Surgery
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:12
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Ovariotomy provides a useful way of unpacking not just the process of&#xD;surgical innovation but also the usefulness of innovation as an analytical&#xD;category in the history of medicine. How might we pin down the meaning&#xD;of “innovation”—let alone “alternative innovation”—in surgery when these&#xD;innovations themselves are unstable, changing entities that are difficult to&#xD;define? Through the example of ovariotomy I show that alternative innovation&#xD;need not necessarily imply competition between diverse innovations,&#xD;but that such a framework might also be used to consider how different versions&#xD;of the “same” operation arise.

Malarial Subjects

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Book Series: Science in History ISBN: 9781107172364 Year: Pages: 350 DOI: 10.1017/9781316771617 Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press Grant: Wellcome Trust
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:15
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Malaria was considered one of the most widespread disease-causing entities in the nineteenth century. It was associated with a variety of frailties far beyond fevers, ranging from idiocy to impotence. And yet, it was not a self-contained category. The reconsolidation of malaria as a diagnostic category during this period happened within a wider context in which cinchona plants and their most valuable extract, quinine, were reinforced as objects of natural knowledge and social control. In India, the exigencies and apparatuses of British imperial rule occasioned the close interactions between these histories. In the process, British imperial rule became entangled with a network of nonhumans that included, apart from cinchona plants and the drug quinine, a range of objects described as malarial, as well as mosquitoes. Malarial Subjects explores this history of the co-constitution of a cure and disease, of British colonial rule and nonhumans, and of science, medicine and empire. This title is also available as Open Access.

18 Surgery, Imperial Rule and Colonial Societies (1800–1930) (Book chapter)

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ISBN: 9781349952601 Year: Pages: 19 DOI: 10.1057/978-1-349-95260-1_18 Language: English
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Grant: Wellcome Trust
Subject: Surgery --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:11
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The following chapter is concerned with the ways in which political, social&#xD;and cultural contexts shape the performance and perceptions of surgery, especially&#xD;under nineteenth-century colonial empires.

Capital Punishment and the Criminal Corpse in Scotland, 1740–1834

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Book Series: Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife ISBN: 9783319620176 9783319620183 Year: Pages: 243 DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-62018-3 Language: English
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Grant: Wellcome Trust
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:15
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This book provides the most in-depth study of capital punishment in Scotland between the mid-eighteenth and early nineteenth century to date. Based upon an extensive gathering and analysis of previously untapped resources, it takes the reader on a journey from the courtrooms of Scotland to the theatre of the gallows. It introduces them to several of the malefactors who faced the hangman’s noose and explores the traditional hallmarks of the spectacle of the scaffold. It demonstrates that the period between 1740 and 1834 was one of discussion, debate and fundamental change in the use of the death sentence and how it was staged in practice. In addition, the study provides an innovative investigation of the post-mortem punishment of the criminal corpse. It offers the reader an insight into the scene at the foot of the gibbets from which criminal bodies were displayed, and around the dissection tables of Scotland’s main universities where criminal bodies were used as cadavers for anatomical demonstration. In doing so it reveals an intermediate stage in the long-term disappearance of public bodily punishment.&#xD;&#xD;

Verdi in Victorian London

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ISBN: 9781783742158 Year: Pages: 360 DOI: 10.11647/OBP.0090 Language: English
Publisher: Open Book Publishers
Subject: Music
Added to DOAB on : 2017-08-22 11:01:03
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"Now a byword for beauty, Verdi’s operas were far from universally acclaimed when they reached London in the second half of the nineteenth century. Why did some critics react so harshly? Who were they and what biases and prejudices animated them? When did their antagonistic attitude change? And why did opera managers continue to produce Verdi’s operas, in spite of their alleged worthlessness?&#xD;Massimo Zicari’s Verdi in Victorian London reconstructs the reception of Verdi’s operas in London from 1844, when a first critical account was published in the pages of The Athenaeum, to 1901, when Verdi’s death received extensive tribute in The Musical Times. In the 1840s, certain London journalists were positively hostile towards the most talked-about representative of Italian opera, only to change their tune in the years to come. The supercilious critic of The Athenaeum, Henry Fothergill Chorley, declared that Verdi’s melodies were worn, hackneyed and meaningless, his harmonies and progressions crude, his orchestration noisy. The scribes of The Times, The Musical World, The Illustrated London News, and The Musical Times all contributed to the critical hubbub.&#xD;Yet by the 1850s, Victorian critics, however grudging, could neither deny nor ignore the popularity of Verdi’s operas. Over the final three decades of the nineteenth century, moreover, London’s musical milieu underwent changes of great magnitude, shifting the manner in which Verdi was conceptualized and making room for the powerful influence of Wagner. Nostalgic commentators began to lament the sad state of the Land of Song, referring to the now departed ""palmy days of Italian opera."" Zicari charts this entire cultural constellation.&#xD;Verdi in Victorian London is required reading for both academics and opera aficionados. Music specialists will value a historical reconstruction that stems from a large body of first-hand source material, while Verdi lovers and Italian opera addicts will enjoy vivid analysis free from technical jargon. For students, scholars and plain readers alike, this book is an illuminating addition to the study of music reception."

Beerhouses, brothels and bobbies

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ISBN: 9781862181397 9781862181403 Year: Pages: 301 Language: English
Publisher: University of Huddersfield Press
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2017-12-14 11:01:57
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Professor David Taylor has established a fine reputation for his books and articles on the history of policing in England. This new book on Huddersfield policing looks at the mid-nineteenth century and issues facing the local area in relation to policing a centre of West Riding textile production.

Il Sito Reale di Capodimonte: Il primo bosco, parco e palazzo dei Borbone di Napoli

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Book Series: UrbsHistoriaeImago: Storia e immagine dei territori, dei centri urbani e delle architetture ISSN: 2611-5468 ISBN: 9788868870119 Year: Volume: 2 DOI: 10.6093/978-88-6887-011-9 Language: Italian
Publisher: FedOA - Federico II University Press
Subject: Architecture
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-11 16:28:49
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Capodimonte was the first Palace of Neapolitan Dinasty “Borbone”, but it was neglected due to the rise of Portici and Caserta’s Royal Palaces, therefore, it was built very slowly. It was completed only a century after the laying of the foundation stone (1738). After so long times, which saw the succession of several architects aiming the leadership to the royal site, some of them were quite famous among the most representative figures of Architecture and Art History in Naples, across Eighteenth and Nineteenth centuries.The Royal Site was originally meant as Hunting reserve nearby the Capital and significant place of rest for the young Carlo di Borbone (Charles of Bourbon), who two years later decided to build a Royal Palace too. That decision was intended to amend the territorial aspects of Neapolitan northern hill, also to influence the urban layout before the unification of Italy. This study, based on a careful documentary and iconographic research, highlights the complex development of the palace and its park which are still paying a high price for the most controversial aspects of the project and its execution, emerged since the beginnings.

Culture and Money in the Nineteenth Century

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ISBN: 9780821421963 9780821445471 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Ohio University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 102793
Added to DOAB on : 2019-04-11 11:21:07
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Since the 1980s, scholars have made the case for examining 19th-century culture, particularly literary output, through the lens of economics. Bivona and Tromp have collected contributions that push New Economic Criticism in new directions.Spanning the Americas, India, England, and Scotland, this volume adopts a global view of the cultural effects of economics and exchange. Contributors use the concept of abstraction to show how economic thought and concerns around money permeated all aspects of 19th-century culture, from the language of wills to arguments around the social purpose of art.The characteristics of investment and speculation; the symbolic and practical meanings of paper money to the Victorians; the shifting value of goods, services, and ideas; the evolving legal conceptualizations of artistic ownership are all essential to understanding nineteenth-century culture in Britain and beyond.

Building a National Literature

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ISBN: 9780801496226 Year: Pages: 376 Language: English
Publisher: Cornell University Press
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2016-10-26 08:56:43
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Building a National Literature boldly takes issue with traditional literary criticism for its failure to explain how literature as a body is created and shaped by institutional forces. Peter Uwe Hohendahl approaches literary history by focusing on the material and ideological structures that determine the canonical status of writers and works. He examines important elements in the making of a national literature, including the political and literary public sphere, the theory and practice of literary criticism, and the emergence of academic criticism as literary history. Hohendahl considers such key aspects of the process in Germany as the rise of liberalism and nationalism, the delineation of the borders of German literature, the idea of its history, the understanding of its cultural function, and the notion of a canon of major and minor authors.

Dickens's London

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Book Series: Edinburgh Critical Studies in Victorian Culture ISBN: 9780748640409 9781474429795 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 100854
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2018-01-25 11:01:48
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Taking Walter Benjamin's Arcades Project as an inspiration, Dickens's London offers an exciting and original project that opens a dialogue between phenomenology, philosophy and the Dickensian representation of the city in all its forms. Julian Wolfreys suggests that in their representations of London - its streets, buildings, public institutions, domestic residences, rooms and phenomena that constitute such space - Dickens's novels and journalism can be seen as forerunners of urban and material phenomenology. While also addressing those aspects of the urban that are developed from Dickens's interpretations of other literary forms, styles and genres, Dickens's London presents in twenty-six episodes (from Banking and Breakfast via the Insolvent Court, Melancholy and Poverty, to Todgers and Time, Voice and Waking) a radical reorientation to London in the nineteenth century, the development of Dickens as a writer, and the ways in which readers today receive and perceive both.

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