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Current Trends of Insect Physiology and Population Dynamics: Modeling Insect Phenology, Demography, and Circadian Rhythms in Variable Environments

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889454891 Year: Pages: 155 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-489-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Physiology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:42
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The current eBook collection includes substantial scientific work in describing how insect species are responding to abiotic factors and recent climatic trends on the basis of insect physiology and population dynamics. The contributions can be broadly split into four chapters: the first chapter focuses on the function of environmental and mostly temperature driven models, to identify the seasonal emergence and population dynamics of insects, including some important pests. The second chapter provides additional examples on how such models can be used to simulate the effect of climate change on insect phenology and population dynamics. The third chapter focuses on describing the effects of nutrition, gene expression and phototaxis in relation to insect demography, growth and development, whilst the fourth chapter provides a short description on the functioning of circadian systems as well as on the evolutionary dynamics of circadian clocks.

Viticulture and Winemaking under Climate Change

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ISBN: 9783039219742 9783039219759 Year: Pages: 294 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-975-9 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Meteorology and Climatology
Added to DOAB on : 2020-01-07 09:08:26
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The importance of viticulture and the winemaking socio-economic sector is acknowledged worldwide. The most renowned winemaking regions show very specific environmental characteristics, where climate usually plays a central role. Considering the strong influence of weather and climatic factors on grapevine yields and berry quality attributes, climate change may indeed significantly impact this crop. Recent trends already point to a pronounced increase in growing season mean temperatures, as well as changes in precipitation regimes, which have been influencing wine typicity across some of the most renowned winemaking regions worldwide. Moreover, several climate scenarios give evidence of enhanced stress conditions for grapevine growth until the end of the century. Although grapevines have high resilience, the clear evidence for significant climate change in the upcoming decades urges adaptation and mitigation measures to be taken by sector stakeholders. To provide hints on the abovementioned issues, we have edited a Special Issue entitled “Viticulture and Winemaking under Climate Change”. Contributions from different fields were considered, including crop and climate modeling, and potential adaptation measures against these threats. The current Special Issue allows for the expansion of scientific knowledge in these particular fields of research, as well as providing a path for future research.

Keywords

viticulture --- crop model --- phenology --- physiological processes --- climate --- micrometeorology --- microclimate --- climate change --- water limitation --- dry mass partitioning --- assimilation --- intercellular CO2 --- stomatal conductance --- leaf water potential --- Vitis vinifera L. --- production system --- S-ABA --- rate of anthocyanin accumulation --- CIRG --- bioactive compounds --- Botrytis cinerea --- low-input --- mechanical thinning --- viticultural training system --- yield formation --- leaf area --- table grapes --- photosynthesis --- berry composition --- phenolics --- natural hail --- grapevine --- phenology --- phenology modelling platform --- Touriga Franca --- Touriga Nacional --- climate change --- RCP4.5 --- EURO-CORDEX --- Douro wine region --- Portugal --- global warming --- technological and phenolic ripeness --- grape --- wine --- sensory analysis --- climate change --- elevated CO2 --- grapevine pest --- mealybug --- parasitoid --- FACE --- predawn water potential --- PRI --- remote sensing --- vineyards --- water status --- WI --- climate change --- Vitis vinifera L. --- general circulation model --- EURO-CORDEX --- phenological model --- grapevine --- Virtual Riesling --- climate change --- temperature --- plant architecture --- crop management --- modelling --- climate change --- viticulture --- adaptation --- temperature --- drought --- plant material --- rootstock --- training system --- phenology --- modeling --- Vitis vinifera --- autochthonous cultivar --- ’Uva Rey’ --- unmanned aerial vehicles --- vigour maps --- spatial variability --- normalized difference vegetation index --- crop water stress index --- crop surface model --- precision viticulture --- climate change --- multi-temporal analysis --- Vitis vinifera (L.) --- SO2 pads --- B. cinerea mold --- grape quality --- light micro-climates --- mitigation strategies --- kaolin --- irrigation --- Vitis vinifera L. --- grape berry tissues --- pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry --- photosynthesis --- photosynthetic pigments --- viticulture --- winemaking --- climatic influence --- climate change --- adaptation measures

Remote Sensing of Above Ground Biomass

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783039212095 9783039212101 Year: Pages: 264 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-210-1 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Technology (General) --- General and Civil Engineering --- Environmental Engineering
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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Above ground biomass has been listed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change as one of the five most prominent, visible, and dynamic terrestrial carbon pools. The increased awareness of the impacts of climate change has seen a burgeoning need to consistently assess carbon stocks to combat carbon sequestration. An accurate estimation of carbon stocks and an understanding of the carbon sources and sinks can aid the improvement and accuracy of carbon flux models, an important pre-requisite of climate change impact projections. Based on 15 research topics, this book demonstrates the role of remote sensing in quantifying above ground biomass (forest, grass, woodlands) across varying spatial and temporal scales. The innovative application areas of the book include algorithm development and implementation, accuracy assessment, scaling issues (local–regional–global biomass mapping), and the integration of microwaves (i.e. LiDAR), along with optical sensors, forest biomass mapping, rangeland productivity and abundance (grass biomass, density, cover), bush encroachment biomass, and seasonal and long-term biomass monitoring.

Keywords

multi-angle remote sensing --- forest structure information --- vegetation indices --- forest biomass --- Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Factor --- biomass --- yield --- AquaCrop model --- spectral index --- particle swarm optimization --- winter wheat --- TerraSAR-X --- Landsat --- pasture biomass --- Wambiana grazing trial --- foliage projective cover --- fractional vegetation cover --- ALOS2 --- mixed forest --- biomass --- lidar --- NDVI --- grass biomass --- SPLSR --- vegetation indices --- estimation accuracy --- pasture biomass --- ground-based remote sensing --- ultrasonic sensor --- field spectrometry --- sensor fusion --- short grass --- alpine grassland conservation --- anthropogenic disturbance --- ecological policies --- climate change --- grazing exclusion --- grazing management --- regional sustainability --- rice --- biomass --- dry matter index --- chlorophyll index --- CIRed-edge --- NDLMA --- forest above ground biomass (AGB) --- random forest --- mapping --- alpine meadow grassland --- above-ground biomass --- inversion model --- error analysis --- applicability evaluation --- Land Surface Phenology --- wetlands --- above ground biomass --- NDVI --- MODIS time series --- food security --- Sahel --- Niger --- rangeland productivity --- livestock --- MODIS --- NDVI --- aboveground biomass --- Atriplex nummularia --- carbon mitigation --- carbon inventory --- forage crops --- remote sensing --- vegetation index --- stem volume --- dry biomass --- conifer --- broadleaves --- light detection and ranging (LiDAR) --- regression analysis --- correlation coefficient --- n/a

Drones for Biodiversity Conservation and Ecological Monitoring

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783039219803 9783039219810 Year: Pages: 176 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-981-0 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2020-01-07 09:08:26
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Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) have already become an affordable and cost-efficient tool to quickly map a targeted area for many emerging applications in the arena of ecological monitoring and biodiversity conservation. Managers, owners, companies, and scientists are using professional drones equipped with high-resolution visible, multispectral, or thermal cameras to assess the state of ecosystems, the effect of disturbances, or the dynamics and changes within biological communities inter alia. We are now at a tipping point on the use of drones for these type of applications over natural areas. UAV missions are increasing but most of them are testing applicability. It is time now to move to frequent revisiting missions, aiding in the retrieval of important biophysical parameters in ecosystems or mapping species distributions. This Special Issue shows UAV applications contributing to a better understanding of biodiversity and ecosystem status, threats, changes, and trends. It documents the enhancement of knowledge in ecological integrity parameters mapping, long-term ecological monitoring based on drones, mapping of alien species spread and distribution, upscaling ecological variables from drone to satellite images: methods and approaches, rapid risk and disturbance assessment using drones, mapping albedo with UAVs, wildlife tracking, bird colony and chimpanzee nest mapping, habitat mapping and monitoring, and a review on drones for conservation in protected areas.

Remote Sensing Technology Applications in Forestry and REDD+

Authors: --- --- ---
ISBN: 9783039284702 9783039284719 Year: Pages: 244 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03928-471-9 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Technology (General) --- Environmental Technology
Added to DOAB on : 2020-04-07 23:07:09
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Advances in close-range and remote sensing technologies are driving innovations in forest resource assessments and monitoring on varying scales. Data acquired with airborne and spaceborne platforms provide high(er) spatial resolution, more frequent coverage, and more spectral information. Recent developments in ground-based sensors have advanced 3D measurements, low-cost permanent systems, and community-based monitoring of forests. The UNFCCC REDD+ mechanism has advanced the remote sensing community and the development of forest geospatial products that can be used by countries for the international reporting and national forest monitoring. However, an urgent need remains to better understand the options and limitations of remote and close-range sensing techniques in the field of forest degradation and forest change. Therefore, we invite scientists working on remote sensing technologies, close-range sensing, and field data to contribute to this Special Issue. Topics of interest include: (1) novel remote sensing applications that can meet the needs of forest resource information and REDD+ MRV, (2) case studies of applying remote sensing data for REDD+ MRV, (3) timeseries algorithms and methodologies for forest resource assessment on different spatial scales varying from the tree to the national level, and (4) novel close-range sensing applications that can support sustainable forestry and REDD+ MRV. We particularly welcome submissions on data fusion.

Keywords

sentinel imagery --- above-ground biomass --- predictive mapping --- machine learning --- geographically weighted regression --- canopy cover (CC) --- spectral --- texture --- digital hemispherical photograph (DHP) --- random forest (RF) --- gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) --- forest inventory --- LiDAR --- tall trees --- overstory trees --- tree mapping --- crown delineation --- aboveground biomass --- Landsat --- random forest --- topography --- human activity --- aboveground biomass estimation --- remote sensing --- crown density --- low-accuracy estimation --- model comparison --- old-growth forest --- multispectral satellite imagery --- random forest --- forest classification --- remote sensing --- forestry --- phenology --- silviculture --- forest growing stock volume (GSV) --- full polarimetric SAR --- subtropical forest --- topographic effects --- environment effects --- geographic information system --- support vector machine --- random forest --- ensemble model --- hazard mapping --- 3D tree modelling --- aboveground biomass estimation --- destructive sampling --- Guyana --- LiDAR --- local tree allometry --- model evaluation --- quantitative structural model --- Pinus massoniana --- specific leaf area --- leaf area --- terrestrial laser scanning --- voxelization --- forest canopy --- REDD+ --- Cameroon --- reference level --- deforestation --- agriculture --- forest baseline --- airborne laser scanning --- terrestrial laser scanning --- remote sensing --- REDD+ --- forestry

Remote Sensing of Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Other Vegetation Parameters

Authors: --- ---
ISBN: 9783039212392 9783039212408 Year: Pages: 334 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-240-8 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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Monitoring of vegetation structure and functioning is critical to modeling terrestrial ecosystems and energy cycles. In particular, leaf area index (LAI) is an important structural property of vegetation used in many land surface vegetation, climate, and crop production models. Canopy structure (LAI, fCover, plant height, and biomass) and biochemical parameters (leaf pigmentation and water content) directly influence the radiative transfer process of sunlight in vegetation, determining the amount of radiation measured by passive sensors in the visible and infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Optical remote sensing (RS) methods build relationships exploiting in situ measurements and/or as outputs of physical canopy radiative transfer models. The increased availability of passive (radar and LiDAR) RS data has fostered their use in many applications for the analysis of land surface properties and processes, thanks also to their insensitivity to weather conditions and the capability to exploit rich structural and textural information. Data fusion and multi-sensor integration techniques are pressing topics to fully exploit the information conveyed by both optical and microwave bands.

Keywords

conifer forest --- leaf area index --- smartphone-based method --- canopy gap fraction --- terrestrial laser scanning --- forest inventory --- density-based clustering --- forest aboveground biomass --- root biomass --- tree heights --- GLAS --- artificial neural network --- allometric scaling and resource limitation --- structure from motion (SfM) --- 3D point cloud --- remote sensing --- local maxima --- fixed tree window size --- managed temperate coniferous forests --- point cloud --- spectral information --- structure from motion (SfM) --- unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) --- chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) --- drought --- Mediterranean --- photochemical reflectance index (PRI) --- photosynthesis --- R690/R630 --- recovery --- BAAPA --- remote sensing --- household survey --- forest --- farm types --- automated classification --- sampling design --- adaptive threshold --- over and understory cover --- LAI --- leaf area index --- EPIC --- simulation --- satellite --- MODIS --- biomass --- evaluation --- southern U.S. forests --- VIIRS --- leaf area index (LAI) --- Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR) --- MODIS --- consistency --- uncertainty --- evaluation --- downscaling --- Pléiades imagery --- unmanned aerial vehicle --- stem volume estimation --- remote sensing --- clumping index --- leaf area index --- trunk --- terrestrial LiDAR --- HemiView --- forest above ground biomass (AGB) --- polarization coherence tomography (PCT) --- P-band PolInSAR --- tomographic profiles --- canopy closure --- global positioning system --- hemispherical sky-oriented photo --- signal attenuation --- geographic information system --- digital aerial photograph --- aboveground biomass --- leaf area index --- photogrammetric point cloud --- recursive feature elimination --- machine-learning --- forest degradation --- multisource remote sensing --- modelling aboveground biomass --- random forest --- Brazilian Amazon --- validation --- phenology --- NDVI --- LAI --- spectral analyses --- European beech --- altitude --- forests biomass --- remote sensing --- REDD+ --- random forest --- Tanzania --- RapidEye

Protection Strategy against Spruce Budworm

Author:
ISBN: 9783039280964 9783039280971 Year: Pages: 220 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03928-097-1 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Forestry --- Biology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2020-01-30 16:39:46
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Spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana (Clem.)) outbreaks are a dominant natural disturbance in the forests of Canada and northeastern USA. Widespread, severe defoliation by this native insect results in large-scale mortality and growth reductions of spruce (Picea sp.) and balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.) forests, and largely determines future age–class structure and productivity. The last major spruce budworm outbreak defoliated over 58 million hectares in the 1970s–1980s, and caused 32–43 million m3/year of timber volume losses from 1978 to 1987, in Canada. Management to deal with spruce budworm outbreaks has emphasized forest protection, spraying registered insecticides to prevent defoliation and keep trees alive. Other tactics can include salvage harvesting, altering harvest schedules to remove the most susceptible stands, or reducing future susceptibility by planting or thinning. Chemical insecticides are no longer used, and protection strategies use biological insecticides Bacillus thuringiensis (B.t.) or tebufenozide, a specific insect growth regulator. Over the last five years, a $30 million research project has tested another possible management tactic, termed an ‘early intervention strategy’, aimed at area-wide management of spruce budworm populations. This includes intensive monitoring to detect ‘hot spots’ of rising budworm populations before defoliation occurs, targeted insecticide treatment to prevent spread, and detailed research into target and non-target insect effects. The objective of this Special Issue is to compile the most recent research on protection strategies against spruce budworm. A series of papers will describe results and prospects for the use of an early intervention strategy in spruce budworm and other insect management.

Keywords

forest pests --- defoliation --- spruce budworm --- multi-spectral remote sensing --- Acadian region --- Maine --- Quebec --- Choristoneura fumiferana --- Abies balsamea --- hardwood content --- defoliation prediction --- Choristoneura fumiferana --- annual defoliation --- spatial autocorrelation --- spatial-temporal patterns --- mixed effect models --- intertree variance --- insect population management --- spruce budworm --- early intervention --- defoliation --- economic losses --- decision support system --- optimized treatment design --- insect population management --- spruce budworm --- early intervention --- defoliation --- economic losses --- decision support system --- computable general equilibrium model --- Pinaceae --- endophytic fungi --- plant tolerance --- Phialocephala scopiformis --- Picea glauca --- spruce budworm --- phenology --- insect susceptibility --- spruce budworm --- forest protection --- early intervention strategy --- egg recruitment --- apparent fecundity --- growth rate --- spruce budworm --- Choristoneura fumiferana --- forest protection --- early intervention strategy --- survival --- apparent fecundity --- immigration --- growth rate --- treatment threshold --- insecticides --- spruce budworm --- moth --- tortricidae --- Choristoneura fumiferana (Clemens) --- forest protection --- early intervention strategy --- pheromone mating disruption --- migration --- dispersal --- spruce budworm --- Choristoneura fumiferana --- moth --- Lepidoptera --- forest protection --- early intervention strategy --- migration --- simulation --- aerobiology --- moths --- migration --- forest protection --- spruce budworm --- Choristoneura fumiferana (Clem.) --- early intervention strategy --- modelling --- circadian rhythm --- foliage protection --- population control --- monitoring --- area-wide management --- science communication --- economic and ecological cost: benefit analyses --- early intervention strategy --- foliage protection --- defoliation --- monitoring --- insecticide application

Advances in Quantitative Remote Sensing in China – In Memory of Prof. Xiaowen Li

Authors: --- ---
ISBN: 9783038972709 Year: Volume: 1 Pages: 404 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-271-6 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Geography
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-08 11:42:05
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Quantitative land remote sensing has recently advanced dramatically, particularly in China. It has been largely driven by vast governmental investment, the availability of a huge amount of Chinese satellite data, geospatial information requirements for addressing pressing environmental issues and other societal benefits. Many individuals have also fostered and made great contributions to its development, and Prof. Xiaowen Li was one of these leading figures. This book is published in memory of Prof. Li. The papers collected in this book cover topics from surface reflectance simulation, inversion algorithm and estimation of variables, to applications in optical, thermal, Lidar and microwave remote sensing. The wide range of variables include directional reflectance, chlorophyll fluorescence, aerosol optical depth, incident solar radiation, albedo, surface temperature, upward longwave radiation, leaf area index, fractional vegetation cover, forest biomass, precipitation, evapotranspiration, freeze/thaw snow cover, vegetation productivity, phenology and biodiversity indicators. They clearly reflect the current level of research in this area. This book constitutes an excellent reference suitable for upper-level undergraduate students, graduate students and professionals in remote sensing.

Keywords

evapotranspiration --- Northeast China --- MS–PT algorithm --- spatial-temporal variations --- controlling factors --- potential evapotranspiration --- vegetation remote sensing --- reflectance model --- spectra --- leaf --- copper --- PROSPECT --- leaf area density --- terrestrial LiDAR --- tree canopy --- vertical structure --- voxel --- spatial representativeness --- heterogeneity --- validation --- land-surface temperature products (LSTs) --- observations --- HiWATER --- remote sensing --- spatiotemporal representative --- cost-efficient, sampling design --- heterogeneity --- validation --- FY-3C/MERSI --- GLASS --- Land surface temperature --- Land surface emissivity --- GPP --- SIF --- MuSyQ-GPP algorithm --- BEPS --- vegetation phenology --- Tibetan Plateau --- MODIS --- NDVI --- start of growing season (SOS) --- end of growing season (EOS) --- GLASS LAI time series --- forest disturbance --- disturbance index --- latent heat --- machine learning algorithms --- plant functional type --- high-resolution freeze/thaw --- AMSR2 --- MODIS --- LAI --- ZY-3 MUX --- GF-1 WFV --- HJ-1 CCD --- maize --- PROSPECT-5B+SAILH (PROSAIL) model --- spatial heterogeneity --- variability --- evapotranspiration --- land surface variables --- probability density function --- HiWATER --- spectral --- albedometer --- interference filter --- photoelectric detector --- validation --- land surface albedo --- multi-scale validation --- rugged terrain --- MRT-based model --- MCD43A3 C6 --- precipitation --- statistics methods --- China --- Tibetan Plateau --- South China’s --- drought --- SPI --- TMI data --- crop-growing regions --- downward shortwave radiation --- machine learning --- gradient boosting regression tree --- AVHRR --- CMA --- BRDF --- aerosol --- MODIS --- sunphotometer --- arid/semiarid --- solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence --- fluorescence quantum efficiency in dark-adapted conditions (FQE) --- SCOPE --- Fraunhofer Line Discrimination (FLD) --- gross primary productivity (GPP) --- longwave upwelling radiation (LWUP) --- Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) --- surface radiation budget --- hybrid method --- remote sensing --- leaf age --- leaf spectral properties --- leaf area index --- Cunninghamia --- Chinese fir --- canopy reflectance --- NIR --- EVI2 --- geometric optical radiative transfer (GORT) model --- land surface albedo --- snow-free albedo --- rugged terrain --- topographic effects --- black-sky albedo (BSA) --- GPP --- NPP --- MODIS --- validation --- phenology --- RADARSAT-2 --- rice --- Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) --- decision tree --- forest canopy height --- aboveground biomass --- ICESat GLAS --- Landsat --- random forest model --- anisotropic reflectance --- BRDF --- rugged terrain --- solo slope --- composite slope --- surface solar irradiance --- geostationary satellite --- polar orbiting satellite --- LUT method --- SURFRAD --- downward shortwave radiation --- daily average value --- Antarctica --- sinusoidal method --- cloud fraction --- interpolation --- boreal forest --- GPP --- spatiotemporal distribution and variation --- meteorological factors --- phenological parameters --- multisource data fusion --- aerosol retrieval --- urban scale --- vegetation dust-retention --- multiple ecological factors --- geographical detector model --- snow cover --- passive microwave --- FY-3C/MWRI --- algorithmic assessment --- China --- land surface temperature --- satellite observations --- flux measurements --- latitudinal pattern --- land cover change --- fractional vegetation cover (FVC) --- multi-data set --- northern China --- spatio-temporal --- inter-annual variation --- uncertainty --- standard error of the mean --- downscaling --- GPP --- spatial heterogeneity --- remote sensing --- subpixel information --- LiDAR --- point cloud --- leaf --- gap fraction --- 3D reconstruction --- biodiversity --- remote sensing --- species richness --- metric comparison --- metric integration --- leaf area index --- MODIS products --- Landsat --- high resolution --- homogeneous and pure pixel filter --- pixel unmixing --- vertical vegetation stratification --- gross primary production (GPP) --- light use efficiency --- dense forest --- MODIS --- VPM --- temperature profiles --- humidity profiles --- n/a --- geometric-optical model --- thermal radiation directionality --- quantitative remote sensing inversion --- scale effects --- comprehensive field experiment

Advances in Quantitative Remote Sensing in China – In Memory of Prof. Xiaowen Li

Authors: --- ---
ISBN: 9783038972761 Year: Volume: 2 Pages: 404 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-277-8 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Geography
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-08 11:42:05
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Abstract

Quantitative land remote sensing has recently advanced dramatically, particularly in China. It has been largely driven by vast governmental investment, the availability of a huge amount of Chinese satellite data, geospatial information requirements for addressing pressing environmental issues and other societal benefits. Many individuals have also fostered and made great contributions to its development, and Prof. Xiaowen Li was one of these leading figures. This book is published in memory of Prof. Li. The papers collected in this book cover topics from surface reflectance simulation, inversion algorithm and estimation of variables, to applications in optical, thermal, Lidar and microwave remote sensing. The wide range of variables include directional reflectance, chlorophyll fluorescence, aerosol optical depth, incident solar radiation, albedo, surface temperature, upward longwave radiation, leaf area index, fractional vegetation cover, forest biomass, precipitation, evapotranspiration, freeze/thaw snow cover, vegetation productivity, phenology and biodiversity indicators. They clearly reflect the current level of research in this area. This book constitutes an excellent reference suitable for upper-level undergraduate students, graduate students and professionals in remote sensing.

Keywords

evapotranspiration --- Northeast China --- MS–PT algorithm --- spatial-temporal variations --- controlling factors --- potential evapotranspiration --- vegetation remote sensing --- reflectance model --- spectra --- leaf --- copper --- PROSPECT --- leaf area density --- terrestrial LiDAR --- tree canopy --- vertical structure --- voxel --- spatial representativeness --- heterogeneity --- validation --- land-surface temperature products (LSTs) --- observations --- HiWATER --- remote sensing --- spatiotemporal representative --- cost-efficient, sampling design --- heterogeneity --- validation --- FY-3C/MERSI --- GLASS --- Land surface temperature --- Land surface emissivity --- GPP --- SIF --- MuSyQ-GPP algorithm --- BEPS --- vegetation phenology --- Tibetan Plateau --- MODIS --- NDVI --- start of growing season (SOS) --- end of growing season (EOS) --- GLASS LAI time series --- forest disturbance --- disturbance index --- latent heat --- machine learning algorithms --- plant functional type --- high-resolution freeze/thaw --- AMSR2 --- MODIS --- LAI --- ZY-3 MUX --- GF-1 WFV --- HJ-1 CCD --- maize --- PROSPECT-5B+SAILH (PROSAIL) model --- spatial heterogeneity --- variability --- evapotranspiration --- land surface variables --- probability density function --- HiWATER --- spectral --- albedometer --- interference filter --- photoelectric detector --- validation --- land surface albedo --- multi-scale validation --- rugged terrain --- MRT-based model --- MCD43A3 C6 --- precipitation --- statistics methods --- China --- Tibetan Plateau --- South China’s --- drought --- SPI --- TMI data --- crop-growing regions --- downward shortwave radiation --- machine learning --- gradient boosting regression tree --- AVHRR --- CMA --- BRDF --- aerosol --- MODIS --- sunphotometer --- arid/semiarid --- solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence --- fluorescence quantum efficiency in dark-adapted conditions (FQE) --- SCOPE --- Fraunhofer Line Discrimination (FLD) --- gross primary productivity (GPP) --- longwave upwelling radiation (LWUP) --- Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) --- surface radiation budget --- hybrid method --- remote sensing --- leaf age --- leaf spectral properties --- leaf area index --- Cunninghamia --- Chinese fir --- canopy reflectance --- NIR --- EVI2 --- geometric optical radiative transfer (GORT) model --- land surface albedo --- snow-free albedo --- rugged terrain --- topographic effects --- black-sky albedo (BSA) --- GPP --- NPP --- MODIS --- validation --- phenology --- RADARSAT-2 --- rice --- Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) --- decision tree --- forest canopy height --- aboveground biomass --- ICESat GLAS --- Landsat --- random forest model --- anisotropic reflectance --- BRDF --- rugged terrain --- solo slope --- composite slope --- surface solar irradiance --- geostationary satellite --- polar orbiting satellite --- LUT method --- SURFRAD --- downward shortwave radiation --- daily average value --- Antarctica --- sinusoidal method --- cloud fraction --- interpolation --- boreal forest --- GPP --- spatiotemporal distribution and variation --- meteorological factors --- phenological parameters --- multisource data fusion --- aerosol retrieval --- urban scale --- vegetation dust-retention --- multiple ecological factors --- geographical detector model --- snow cover --- passive microwave --- FY-3C/MWRI --- algorithmic assessment --- China --- land surface temperature --- satellite observations --- flux measurements --- latitudinal pattern --- land cover change --- fractional vegetation cover (FVC) --- multi-data set --- northern China --- spatio-temporal --- inter-annual variation --- uncertainty --- standard error of the mean --- downscaling --- GPP --- spatial heterogeneity --- remote sensing --- subpixel information --- LiDAR --- point cloud --- leaf --- gap fraction --- 3D reconstruction --- biodiversity --- remote sensing --- species richness --- metric comparison --- metric integration --- leaf area index --- MODIS products --- Landsat --- high resolution --- homogeneous and pure pixel filter --- pixel unmixing --- vertical vegetation stratification --- gross primary production (GPP) --- light use efficiency --- dense forest --- MODIS --- VPM --- temperature profiles --- humidity profiles --- n/a --- geometric-optical model --- thermal radiation directionality --- quantitative remote sensing inversion --- scale effects --- comprehensive field experiment

Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils

Authors: --- ---
ISBN: 9783038976561 9783038976578 Year: Pages: 474 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-657-8 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-04-25 16:37:17
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This Special Issue on the Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils presents 31 new research papers on one of the most diverse and successful groups of animals on Earth, the beetle superfamily Curculionoidea. It was in part inspired to commemorate the extraordinary life and scientific achievements of Guillermo (&ldquo;Willy&rdquo;) Kuschel (1918&ndash;2017), who shaped this field of science over the last century like no other weevil systematist. The papers in this memorial issue span weevil faunas from all over the globe, including South and Central America, Africa, Europe and the Near East, South-East Asia, New Guinea, Australia and New Zealand. They include major advances on the phylogeny and classification of the &ldquo;broad-nosed&rdquo; weevils (Entiminae), on the weevils associated with American cycads and on the unique extinct weevil fauna preserved in the 100-million-year-old Burmese amber, when weevils started to diversify alongside the oldest angiosperm plants. They comprise a tribute to Willy Kuschel, the proceedings of a weevil symposium held in his honor in 2016 in Orlando, Florida, 24 systematic studies (including seven phylogenetic analyses) and five other contributions on the diversity, biology, distribution, evolution and fossil history of weevils. In the papers collated in this volume, 30 new genera and 92 new species of weevils are described and a new family of extinct weevils is recognized.

Keywords

constraint analysis --- AU test --- SH test --- KH test --- mitochondrial genomes --- Curculionoidea --- Curculionidae --- Cossoninae --- Rhyncolini --- Rhyncolina --- taxonomy --- new species --- mature larva --- morphology --- host plant --- Cape Verde --- biogeography --- microclimate --- species competition --- taxonomy --- South Africa --- Namibia --- weevils --- new taxa --- spermatheca --- Mimaulus --- Spartecerus --- spatio-temporal diffusion --- specialist weevils --- parasitic plants --- co-dispersal through space and time --- stable populations --- Coleoptera --- Curculionidae --- Curculioninae --- Acentrusini --- phylogeny --- Coleoptera --- Curculionidae --- Brachycerinae --- Tanysphyrini --- Afroryzophilus --- new species --- Afrotropical region --- Belidae --- Oxycoryninae --- Erotylidae --- Pharaxonothinae --- cycad pollination --- Alien --- invasive --- exotic --- biodiversity --- Patagonia --- Pinus radiata --- Eucalyptus --- taxonomy --- weevil --- new species --- Araucariaceae --- Hoop Pine --- Klinki Pine --- Australia --- Papuan region --- Neotropical region --- broad-nosed weevils --- Naupactini --- Pantomorus-Naupactus complex --- phylogeny --- COI --- combined evidence --- 1K Weevils Project --- biogeography --- classification --- Curculionidae --- Curculionoidea --- fossils --- Guillermo Kuschel --- morphology --- molecular phylogenetics --- DNA barcoding --- phylogeny --- phytophagy --- weevils --- Dichotrachelini --- systematics --- morphology --- evolution --- mt-Cox1 --- Cryptoplini --- taxonomy --- weevils --- tectal aedeagus --- Kuschelorhynchus --- Macadamia --- Syzygium --- Australia --- New Guinea --- Curculionidae --- biological control --- target host --- non-target host --- taxonomy --- phylogeny --- Sclerocardius --- Sclerocardiini --- taxonomy --- systematics --- elytro-tergal stridulation --- taxonomy --- identification --- diagnostics --- pollination --- flightlessness --- Curculionoidea --- weevil --- hygrophilous --- aquatic --- semi-aquatic --- riparian --- key --- Israel --- Curculionidae --- Anchonini --- Molytinae --- Aethiopacorep africanus --- neotype --- Titilayo --- Titilayo barclayi --- Titilayo garnerae --- Titilayo geiseri --- Titilayo takanoi --- Titilayo perrinae --- Titilayo saotomense --- Titilayo turneri --- taxonomy --- distribution --- taxonomy --- weevil --- new species --- Australia --- Papuan region --- Araceae --- biodiversity --- ecology --- faunal inventories --- mimicry --- phenology --- Brachycerinae --- Tanysphyrini --- Afroryzophilus --- new species --- Afrotropical region --- Cossoninae --- Rhyncolini --- Rhyncolina --- taxonomy --- new species --- Aciphylla --- Chatham Islands --- integrative taxonomy --- Poor Knights Islands --- weevils --- Urodontinae --- Urodontidius --- genitalia --- larva --- life history --- galling habit --- silk production --- taxonomy --- South Africa --- Namibia --- weevils --- new taxa --- Broad-nosed weevils --- Entiminae --- tribal relationships --- combined evidence --- ribosomal markers --- structural alignment --- mitochondrial COI --- adults --- larvae --- biography --- obituary --- weevils --- systematics --- publications --- Borneo --- tropical forest canopies --- fogging --- diversity --- forest disturbance --- weevil fauna --- longhorned beetle (Cerambycidae) --- new species --- Curculionoidea --- Mesophyletidae --- Cretaceous --- taxonomy --- morphology --- CT scanning --- amber preparation --- angiosperm associations --- weevil larvae --- palm weevils --- invasive species --- comparative morphology --- homonym --- taxonomy --- Curculionoidea --- Mesophyletidae --- Cretaceous

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