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Assembly of the Photosystem II Membrane-Protein Complex of Oxygenic Photosynthesis

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889452330 Year: Pages: 315 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-233-0 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Botany --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-10-13 14:57:01
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Abstract

Photosystem II is a 700-kDa membrane-protein super-complex responsible for the light-driven splitting of water in oxygenic photosynthesis. The photosystem is comprised of two 350-kDa complexes each made of 20 different polypeptides and over 80 co-factors. While there have been major advances in understanding the mature structure of this photosystem many key protein factors involved in the assembly of the complex do not appear in the holoenzyme. The mechanism for assembling this super-complex is a very active area of research with newly discovered assembly factors and subcomplexes requiring characterization. Additionally the ability to split water is inseparable from light-induced photodamage that arises from radicals and reactive O2 species generated by Photosystem II chemistry. Consequently, to sustain water splitting, a “self repair” cycle has evolved whereby damaged protein is removed and replaced so as to extend the working life of the complex. Understanding how the biogenesis and repair processes are coordinated is among several important questions that remain to be answered. Other questions include: how and when are the inorganic cofactors inserted during the assembly and repair processes and how are the subcomplexes protected from photodamage during assembly? Evidence has also been obtained for Photosystem II biogenesis centers in cyanobacteria but do these also exist in plants? Do the molecular mechanisms associated with Photosystem II assembly shed fresh light on the assembly of other major energy-transducing complexes such as Photosystem I or the cytochrome b6/f complex or indeed other respiratory complexes? The contributions to this Frontiers in Plant Science Research Topic are likely to reveal new details applicable to the assembly of a range of membrane-protein complexes, including aspects of self-assembly and solar energy conversion that may be applied to artificial photosynthetic systems. In addition, a deeper understanding of Photosystem II assembly — particularly in response to changing environmental conditions — will provide new knowledge underpinning photosynthetic yields which may contribute to improved food production and long-term food security.

Salinity Tolerance in Plants

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ISBN: 9783039210268 / 9783039210275 Year: Pages: 422 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-027-5 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Biochemistry
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-26 10:09:00
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Salt stress is one of the most damaging abiotic stresses because most crop plants are susceptible to salinity to different degrees. According to the FAO, about 800 million Has of land are affected by salinity worldwide. Unfortunately, this situation will worsen in the context of climate change, where there will be an overall increase in temperature and a decrease in average annual rainfall worldwide. This Special Issue presents different research works and reviews on the response of plants to salinity, focused from different points of view: physiological, biochemical, and molecular levels. Although an important part of the studies on the response to salinity have been carried out with Arabidopsis plants, the use of other species with agronomic interest is also notable, including woody plants. Most of the conducted studies in this Special Issue were focused on the identification and characterization of candidate genes for salt tolerance in higher plants. This identification would provide valuable information about the molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in the salt tolerance response, and it also supplies important resources to breeding programs for salt tolerance in plants.

Keywords

Arabidopsis --- Brassica napus --- ion homeostasis --- melatonin --- NaCl stress --- nitric oxide --- redox homeostasis --- Chlamydomonas reinhardtii --- bZIP transcription factors --- salt stress --- transcriptional regulation --- photosynthesis --- lipid accumulation --- Apocyni Veneti Folium --- salt stress --- multiple bioactive constituents --- physiological changes --- multivariate statistical analysis --- banana (Musa acuminata L.) --- ROP --- genome-wide identification --- abiotic stress --- salt stress --- MaROP5g --- rice --- genome-wide association study --- salt stress --- germination --- natural variation --- Chlamydomonas reinhardtii --- salt stress --- transcriptome analysis --- impairment of photosynthesis --- underpinnings of salt stress responses --- chlorophyll fluorescence --- J8-1 plum line --- mandelonitrile --- Prunus domestica --- redox signalling --- salicylic acid --- salt-stress --- soluble nutrients --- Arabidopsis thaliana --- VOZ --- transcription factor --- salt stress --- transcriptional activator --- chlorophyll fluorescence --- lipid peroxidation --- Na+ --- photosynthesis --- photosystem --- RNA binding protein --- nucleolin --- salt stress --- photosynthesis --- light saturation point --- booting stage --- transcriptome --- grapevine --- salt stress --- ROS detoxification --- phytohormone --- transcription factors --- Arabidopsis --- CDPK --- ion homeostasis --- NMT --- ROS --- salt stress --- antioxidant enzymes --- Arabidopsis thaliana --- ascorbate cycle --- hydrogen peroxide --- reactive oxygen species --- salinity --- SnRK2 --- RNA-seq --- DEUs --- flax --- NaCl stress --- EST-SSR --- Salt stress --- Oryza sativa --- proteomics --- iTRAQ quantification --- cell membrane injury --- root activity --- antioxidant systems --- ion homeostasis --- melatonin --- salt stress --- signal pathway --- SsMAX2 --- Sapium sebiferum --- drought, osmotic stress --- salt stress --- redox homeostasis --- strigolactones --- ABA --- TGase --- photosynthesis --- salt stress --- polyamines --- cucumber --- abiotic stresses --- high salinity --- HKT1 --- halophytes --- glycophytes --- poplars (Populus) --- salt tolerance --- molecular mechanisms --- SOS --- ROS --- Capsicum annuum L. --- CaDHN5 --- salt stress --- osmotic stress --- dehydrin --- Gossypium arboretum --- salt tolerance --- single nucleotide polymorphisms --- association mapping. --- n/a

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