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Franz von Ottenthal (1818–1899)

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ISBN: 9783205784609 Year: Pages: 310 Seiten DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_437185 Language: German
Publisher: Böhlau Grant: Austrian Science Fund - D 4127
Added to DOAB on : 2013-03-27 11:49:23
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Dr. Franz von Ottenthal served as a General Practitioner in Sand, in the South Tyrolean Tauferer Ahrntal from 1847 to 1899, over a period lasting more than 50 years. From 1861 until 1882, in a period of great regional and imperial tensions, he even was member of the Tyrolean Landtag (diet).In 1837/8 he began his medical studies at the University of Vienna, where important physicians from the "Zweite Wiener Medizinische Schule" like Carl von Rokitansky, Joseph Skoda and Philipp Semmelweis were teaching.Ottenthal worked as a medical expert in Windisch-Matrei (East Tyrol) for almost two years. Then he went back home and became a General Practitioner in Neumelans, the residence of his family.This biography treats particularly the career as a physician, his engagement in the medical service and the difficulties during the collaboration with medical authorities. On the other side it contains further an analysis of the medical records and the letters of his patients for a better patient view. Further this biography discusses open questions like medical development, fees, properties of a noble rural physicians in the second part of the 19 century and the competition with other physicians and healers. A big space is dedicated to the treatment of mental illness. Ottenthal wasn't a 'psychiatrist', but he was as well responsible for the care and the treatment of persons with mental disease. With a report by a physician began - crossing a lot of other institutions - the way in the asylum.The Ottenthal family, whose everyday life has tried to be reconstructed along private correspondence, is a typical example of a family from the second part of the 19th century between nobility and bourgeoisie characterized on the one hand by qualification, know-how and a lucrative job and on the other by a nobility title, fortune and landed property.Franz von Ottenthal wasn't a famous physician like Rudolf Virchow, Robert Koch or Carl von Rokitansky. Nevertheless he was a modern, political engaged, self-confident practitioner and he is a very good example for the fusion of nobility and bourgeoisie in a rural life of the 19th century.This publication should be a contribution to the exploration of rural medical practice, which is little known and often poor of sources. It will even be a starting-point for further comparative studies of other medical biographies and legacies.

Work-Life Balance: Essential or Ephemeral?

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889452545 Year: Pages: 75 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-254-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Pediatrics
Added to DOAB on : 2018-02-27 16:16:44
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Burn-out and suicide rates among physicians and scientists in academic medicine are at an all-time high and jeopardize the future of our entire profession. In the last 4 years alone, burn-out rates among physicians have increased by 25%. In a recent 2017 Medscape publication, burn-out rates in Critical Care physicians ranked in 9th place and Pediatricians ranked 13th among 27 subspecialties. Astonishingly, over 50% of the participants reported burn-out symptoms, with clear race and gender disparities. While men generally report higher burn-out rates than women, it is important to emphasize that response rates from women in these surveys were notoriously low and may not represent the complete picture. These numbers are even more dismal for tenured academic faculty at research-extensive universities. In this group, emotional exhaustion (i.e. high burn-out) is reported at 35% with a clear association with age and lower burn-out levels in the older tenured faculty. While no gender or racial/ethnic differences were found in this particular group, higher levels of burn-out were identified in individuals with financial responsibilities beyond a spouse and child. While it is comforting to note the increasing public interest and research activities in this field, successful approaches to ameliorate the burden and consequences of physician burn-out are still inadequately developed. Academic centers increasingly offer some type of work-life balance program to their employees but, unfortunately, these programs are frequently adopted from corporate business models and remain largely ineffective in the academic environment. It should be evident to most administrators that the stressors of academic clinicians and scientists substantially differ from those of corporate employees. Based on these observations and over 75 years of combined experience in academic medicine amongst the three editors of this Research Topic, we collected 26 manuscripts from 22 authors at different career stages and different genders, ethnicities, marital status and subspecialties to identify and stratify common and specific stressors and therapeutic approaches to ameliorate burn-out and achieve work-life balance in academic medicine. We are confident that each reader will identify with at least one, if not several, of the authors’ opinions, experiences and approaches to attain greater work-life balance and thereby avoid the consequences of burn-out in modern academic medicine.

Keywords

work-life balance --- stress --- Suicide --- academic --- physician --- Career --- Family --- lifestyle --- Health --- Well-being

Measures of Spirituality/Religiosity—Description of Concepts and Validation of Instruments

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ISBN: 9783038977582 9783038977599 Year: Pages: 148 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-759-9 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Religion
Added to DOAB on : 2019-04-25 16:37:17
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Why do we need more questionnaires to measure aspects of spirituality/religiosity when we already have so many well-tried instruments in use? One answer is that research in this field is growing and that new research questions continuously do arise. Several of these new questions cannot be easily answered with the instruments designed for previous questions. The field is expanding and, consequently, the research topics. Meanwhile several multidimensional instruments were developed which cover existential, prosocial, religious and non-religious forms of spirituality, hope, peace and trust—and several more. The ‘disadvantage’ of these instruments is the fact that some are conceptually broad and often rather unspecific, but they might be suited quite well for culturally and spiritually diverse populations when the intention is to compare such diverse groups. This is the reason why more research on new instruments is needed as can be found in this Special Issue, and to stimulate a critical debate about their pros and cons.

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