Search results: Found 32

Listing 1 - 10 of 32 << page
of 4
>>
Sort by
Communicating safely & effectively using plant names (Book chapter)

Author:
ISBN: 9788192624303 Year: Pages: 15 Language: English
Publisher: Maven Publishers Grant: Wellcome Trust
Subject: Botany
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:11
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

This paper describes a new initiative to provide information services in support of professionals, including legislators, that work in health, pharmacovigilance, the herbal and pharmaceutical industries or that undertake pharmaceutical research. The services are being designed to help these audiences to use plant names appropriately and navigate safely the rich information sources that already exist for medicinal plants. Input from the user community is sought to ensure that the services built meet practical needs and are sustainable.

Plant Name Resources (Book chapter)

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
ISBN: XXXXXXXXXXXXX Year: Pages: 10 Language: English
Publisher: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) Grant: Wellcome Trust
Subject: Botany
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:12
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Plant names are the key to communicating and managing information about plants. This paper considers how providers of high quality technical plant name information can better meet the requirements non-botanical audiences who also rely on plant names for elements of their work. The International Plant Name Index, World Checklist of Selected Plant Families and The Plant List are used as examples to illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of plant name resources from a non-expert user’s perspective. The above resources can be thought of as botanists pushing data at audiences. Without closer engagement with users, however, there is a limit to their relevance and impact. The need to cover common names is a frequent criticism of existing resources. The Medicinal Plant Names Services (MPNS, www.kew.org/mpns) is an example of how plant name resources can be adapted to better address the needs of a non-botanical audience. Some of the major challenges are outlined and solutions suggested.

Keywords

Plant names --- information --- plants

Intertwined Histories: Plants in their Social Contexts

Author:
Book Series: Calgary Institute for the Humanities ISSN: 25606891 ISBN: 9781773850917 Year: Pages: 120 Language: English
Publisher: University of Calgary Press
Subject: Agriculture (General) --- Plant Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-09-05 22:30:48
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

How do we understand the boundaries of individual creatures?What are the systems of interdependency that bind all living creatures together? Plants were among the the first to colonize the planet. They created the soil and the atmosphere that made life possible for animals. They are some of the largest and oldest life forms on Earth. In spite of their primacy, Western cultures have traditionally regarded plants as the lowest life forms, lacking mobility, sensation, and communication. But recent research argues that plants move and respond to their environment, communicate with each other, and form partnerships with other species.Art, poetry, and essays by cultural anthropologists, experimental plant biologists, philosophers, botanists and foresters expose the complex interactions of the vibrant living world around us and give us a lens through which we can explore our intertwined histories.

Keywords

Plants --- Art --- Poetry --- Essays

Sub-cellular Proteomics

Authors: ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889193028 Year: Pages: 254 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-302-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Botany --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-02-05 17:24:33
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Whilst significant advances have been made in whole organismal proteomics approaches, many researchers still rely on combinations of tissue selection and subcellular prefractionation methods to reduce the complexity of protein extracts from plants prior to proteomic analysis. Often this will allow identification of many lower abundance proteins of the target proteome and it may involve the selection of specific organs, cell types or the isolation of specific subcellular components. These subcellular proteomes provide insight into functions following various treatments and also contribute to the wider understanding of the entire organismal proteome by cataloguing a series of sub-proteome contents. The aim of this Research Topic is to bring together knowledge of sub cellular components in different plant species to provide a basis for accelerated research. It aims to provide a mini-review for each proposed section that summarizes the current understanding of a particular proteome, with the anticipation that every 5 - 10 years we can update these definitive publications.

Green Carbon

Authors: --- --- ---
ISBN: 9781921313882 Year: Pages: 47 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_459256 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: Forestry --- Environmental Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2012-06-14 11:46:24
License: ANU Press

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The colour of carbon matters. Green carbon is the carbon stored in the plants and soil of natural ecosystems and is a vital part of the global carbon cycle. This report is the first in a series that examines the role of natural forests in the storage of carbon, the impacts of human land use activities, and the implications for climate change policy nationally and internationally. REDD (“reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation”) is now part of the agenda for the “Bali Action Plan” being debated in the lead-up to the Copenhagen climate change conference in 2009. Currently, international rules are blind to the colour of carbon so that the green carbon in natural forests is not recognised, resulting in perverse outcomes including ongoing deforestation and forest degradation, and the conversion of extensive areas of land to industrial plantations. This report examines REDD policy from a green carbon scientific perspective. Subsequent reports will focus on issues concerning the carbon sequestration potential of commercially logged natural forests, methods for monitoring REDD, and the long term implications of forest policy and management for the global carbon cycle and climate change.

Green Carbon Part 2.

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
ISBN: 9781921666711 Year: Pages: 124 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_459257 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: Forestry --- Environmental Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2012-06-14 11:46:24
License: ANU Press

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

This report is the second in a series that examines the role of natural forests and woodlands in the storage of carbon. Understanding the role of natural ecosystems in carbon storage is an important part of solving the climate change problem. This report presents a landscape-wide green carbon account of the ‘Great Western Woodlands’ (GWW), sixteen million hectares of mostly contiguous natural woody vegetation to the east of the wheatbelt in south-western Western Australia. For the first time, we provide an overview of the vegetation structure, climate, geology and historical land use of the GWW, and examine how these interact to affect the carbon dynamics of this region’s landscape ecosystems. An analysis of time-series of satellite imagery is used to develop a fire history of the GWW since the 1970s. These layers of environmental information, along with field survey data and remotely sensed greenness, are used to construct a spatial model to estimate biomass carbon stocks of the woodlands at the present day, and to infer an upper limit to the carbon sequestration potential of the GWW. A range of management options to enable protection of high quality carbon stocks and restoration of degraded stocks are evaluated.

Autophagy in plants and algae

Authors: ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194773 Year: Pages: 102 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-477-3 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Botany --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-03-10 08:14:33
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Autophagy (also known as macroautophagy) is an evolutionarily conserved process by which cytoplasmic components are nonselectively enclosed within a double-membrane vesicle known as the autophagosome and delivered to the vacuole for degradation of toxic components and recycling of needed nutrients. This catabolic process is required for the adequate adaptation and response of the cell, and correspondingly the whole organism, to different types of stress including nutrient starvation or oxidative damage. Autophagy has been extensively investigated in yeasts and mammals but the identification of autophagy-related (ATG) genes in plant and algal genomes together with the characterization of autophagy-deficient mutants in plants have revealed that this process is structurally and functionally conserved in photosynthetic eukaryotes. Recent studies have demonstrated that autophagy is active at a basal level under normal growth in plants and is upregulated during senescence and in response to nutrient limitation, oxidative stress, salt and drought conditions and pathogen attack. Autophagy was initially considered as a non-selective pathway, but numerous observations mainly obtained in yeasts revealed that autophagy can also selectively eliminate specific proteins, protein complexes and organelles. Interestingly, several types of selective autophagy appear to be also conserved in plants, and the degradation of protein aggregates through specific adaptors or the delivery of chloroplast material to the vacuole via autophagy has been reported. This research topic aims to gather recent progress on different aspects of autophagy in plants and algae. We welcome all types of articles including original research, methods, opinions and reviews that provide new insights about the autophagy process and its regulation.

Structure, Chemical Analysis, Biosynthesis, Metabolism, Molecular Engineering and Biological Functions of Phytoalexins

Author:
ISBN: 9783038427551 9783038427568 Year: Pages: 206 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-03-16 13:34:06
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Ever since the concept of phytoalexins was proposed by Müller and Borger in 1940, these compounds have attracted considerable attention due to the central role they play in the defense mechanisms of various plants. Besides displaying antifungal activity in numerous plant–pathogen interactions, phytoalexins have been implicated in human health and disease as antioxidant, anticancer and cardioprotective agents as well as being supposed to act positively in neurodegenerative illnesses. More than 25 years after the work of Siemann and Creasy which established a relationship between the concentration of the phytoalexin resveratrol in wine and the beneficial effects of wine consumption on health, the relevant literature on phytoalexins and their role in health and disease has increased tremendously. Knowledge on phytoalexins relies on fields as diverse as organic synthesis, analytical chemistry, plant molecular pathology, biocontrol, biochemistry and various aspects of biomedicine and biotechnology. It is almost impossible to review all of these aspects and, therefore, an attempt is made in the present book to illustrate some of them with a particular emphasis on the induction mechanisms of phytoalexin biosynthesis, methods for their analysis in complex matrices, fungal metabolism and phytoalexin bioactivity. This book will serve as a resource for teachers, researchers and students concerned with the study of phytoalexins.

Plant Life of Southwestern Australia. Adaptations for Survival

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783110370195 Year: Pages: 268 DOI: 10.1515/9783110370195 Language: English
Publisher: De Gruyter
Subject: Ecology --- Plant Sciences --- Environmental Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-06 11:48:03
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Southwestern Australia is unique as it contains the world`s most nutrient-impoverished soils, experiences a prolonged-summer period and the vegetation is extremely fire-prone. It is also world-renowned for its relative high level of flora biodiversity. This book focuses on the diverse range of morphological and physiological adaptations evolved by the flora to survive in the harsh Mediterranean-type climate.

Thiol-based redox homeostasis and signalling

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889192847 Year: Pages: 235 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-284-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Botany --- Physiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-10 11:59:07
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

In contrast to the situation in heterotrophic organisms, plant genomes code for a significantly larger number of oxidoreductases such as thioredoxins (TRXs) and glutaredoxins (GRXs). These proteins provide a biochemical mechanism that allows the rapid and reversible activation or deactivation of protein functions in response to changing environmental conditions, as oxidative conditions caused by excessive photosynthesis. Indeed, owing to the fact that cysteines are sensitive to oxidation, TRXs and GRXs play an essential role in controlling the redox state of protein thiol groups. These redox-dependent post-translational modifications have proven to be critical for many cellular functions constituting regulatory, signalling or protective mechanisms. The articles contained in this Research Topic provide timely overviews and new insights into thiol-dependent redox regulation mechanisms with a focus on TRX- and GRX-based reduction systems in plants. The different contexts discussed take into account physiological, developmental and environmental conditions.

Listing 1 - 10 of 32 << page
of 4
>>
Sort by