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Réseaux d’influence et politique locale en Indonésie : Les « hommes forts » de l’organisation Pendekar Banten

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ISBN: 9782355960086 DOI: 10.4000/books.irasec.934 Language: French
Publisher: Institut de recherche sur l’Asie du Sud-Est contemporaine
Subject: Political Science
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-06 13:15:36
License: OpenEdition Licence for Books

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En Indonésie, les milices civiles ont dans une large mesure participé aux différents soulèvements et mouvements politiques qui ont tracé le chemin de l’indépendance du pays en 1945. À Sumatra, Java, Madura, Bali, ces milices avaient pour socle des écoles d’arts martiaux, que le gouvernement entreprit de maîtriser par le biais d’organisations de type paramilitaire. Je propose ici d’étudier l’une d’entre elles, la Persatuan Pendekar Persilatan dan Seni Budaya Banten Indonesia (PPPSBBI), qui opère localement sous le nom de Pendekar Banten, les « hommes forts de Banten ».

Islam and the making of the nation: Kartosuwiryo and political Islam in twentieth-century Indonesia

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Book Series: Verhandelingen van het Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde ISBN: 9789067183864 9789004260467 Year: Volume: 282 Pages: 244 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_424363 Language: English
Publisher: Brill Grant: Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek
Subject: Social Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2012-08-25 18:56:29
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For decades, scholars of Indonesia have rejected the religious claims of the Darul Islam movement, interpreting the antagonism between the Islamic state and Soekarno’s republic as a fight for power, self-assertion, or land rights. Recently Kartosuwiryo and the Darul Islam have become heroic symbols of the local Islamist struggle, offering an alternative vision of this politician. The author looks beyond this dichotomy between rebel and martyr to unveil a ‘third’ dimension of Kartosuwiryo—a politician whose legacy has been shaping the role of Islam in Indonesian politics for over fifty years. In a blend of archival sources, printed material, and oral accounts, the author follows the career and ideology of Kartosuwiryo, nationalist leader of the Sarekat Islam party and later Imam of the Islamic State of Indonesia. Following the trajectory of a political activism that was consistently dedicated to the formation of an independent Indonesian state, the chapters delineate the gradual radicalization of the Islamic party and of Kartosuwiryo’s own ideals from the 1920s until the 1950s. Focusing on the dialectic between the religious and secular anti-colonial movements, this book explores the failure of political Islam in the mid-1950s; the consolidation of the Pancasila state under Soekarno’s and Suharto’s regimes; the latter’s attempt to co-opt what was left of the Darul Islam in the 1970s; and the re-emergence of political Islam and Kartosuwiryo’s memory in the post-1998 era. A testament to the relevance of historical enquiry in understanding contemporary politics, Islam and the making of the nation guides the reader through the contingencies of the past that have led to the transformation of a nationalist leader into a ‘separatist rebel’ and a ‘martyr’, while at the same time shaping the public perception of political Islam and strengthening the position of the Pancasila in contemporary Indonesia. Chiara Formichi (1982) has a PhD from the Department of History of the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, in 2009, and she is Assistant Professor in Asian and International Studies at City University of Hong Kong. This monograph was drafted during a post-doctoral fellowship at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore. Her interests include the political history of Indonesia, Islam in Southeast Asia, transnational Islamic movements, and inter-Asian intellectual flows. In addition to several articles, her publications include Beyond Shi’ism: Alid piety in Muslim Southeast Asia (London: I.B.Tauris, 2013), Formichi and Feener eds.

Islam and the 2009 Indonesian Elections, Political and Cultural Issues : The Case of the Prosperous Justice Party (PKS)

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ISBN: 9782355960017 DOI: 10.4000/books.irasec.754 Language: English
Publisher: Institut de recherche sur l’Asie du Sud-Est contemporaine
Subject: Political Science
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-06 13:15:36
License: OpenEdition Licence for Books

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The history of the Prosperous Justice Party (PKS) is part of the longstanding tradition of political Islam in Indonesia. Born in 1912 with the foundation of the Union of Muslim Traders (Sarekat Dagang Islam) this trend dominated the emerging nationalism in the Dutch East Indies for nearly twenty years. This initial momentum lies at the the origin of the two-dimensional Islamist project: to islamicise society by cleansing Islam of all practices considered to be impure; to mobilise the electorate by invoking Islamic values and their necessary implementation. Indeed, the birth and development of political Islam was closely linked to the reformist Muslim movement which in religious, cultural and social matters attempted to face the colonial challenge through a religious surge. In Indonesia, the Muhammadiyah, founded in 1912, and the Persatuan Islam, founded in 1923, provided most of the early generations of activists. During the decade after independence, militant Islam played a leading role in Indonesian politics. Between 1945 and 1960, the Masjumi party, which brought together most Muslim organisations, was one of the main government components and thereby constituted the matrix of political Islam in Indonesia to which the current generation of activists still refer. The discussions conducted within this party, especially the delicate compromises made between divine law and people's democracy, preconfigured the present debates conducted by Islamic parties. Like the current leaders of the PKS, this first generation of “government Islamists” was also confronted with economic and social modernity issues such as those related to the role of the West in this process. As the two following contributions remind us, its failure is mainly due to domestic reasons that in turn heavily influenced the way Indonesian Islam later considered these issues. Banned by President Sukarno and marginalised by the emerging New Order, the proponents of militant Islam had no choice but to withdraw from conventional politics. Here the organisational model of the Muslim Brotherhood (also repressed in several Arab countries) as well as the financial resources and literature made available to them by Wahhabi Islam networks contributed to the radicalisation of their discourse. The two terms Dakwah (preaching) and Tarbiyah (education) were therefore used to describe a movement based on the conviction that the re-Islamisation of Indonesian society was the essential precondition for its return to the political scene. Paradoxically, after the initial phase of repression, it was the New Order that favoured this agenda. From the early 1990s, some of the networks born from the Islamic revival were instrumented by a power lacking support and looking for scapegoats (Sino-Indonesian Christians...) on whom to deflect public anger. However, most student associations from the Tarbiyah movement did not let themselves be dragged into this trend and, true to their moral position, joined the opposition against the declining Soeharto regime. From this movement the Justice Party (PK) was born in 1998 (later transformed into the Prosperous Justice Party, or the PKS).

Quo vadis, politischer Islam?

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Book Series: Edition Politik ISBN: 9783837631203 9783839431207 Year: DOI: 10.14361/9783839431207 Language: German
Publisher: transcript Verlag Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 103332
Subject: Political Science
Added to DOAB on : 2018-03-30 11:01:59
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Sowohl der "Arabische Frühling" als auch das Erstarken der dschihadistischen Kampfgruppe "Islamischer Staat" haben die diversen islamistischen Bewegungen in den Fokus der medialen und publizistischen Aufmerksamkeit rücken lassen. Auf der Basis der Gesellschaftstheorie der Politik Niklas Luhmanns untersucht Thorsten Hasche mit der AKP, der al-Qaida und der Muslimbruderschaft drei zentrale Bewegungen des sunnitischen Islamismus. Historisch und vergleichend nimmt er dabei ihre Vordenker, ihre politischen Ideologien und ihre Strukturen in den Blick. Es wird deutlich: Der sunnitische politische Islam wird auch mittelfristig ein wirkmächtiger Bestandteil des weltpolitischen Systems bleiben.

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