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Wet and Dry Periods in Regions Surrounding the Atlantic Ocean Basin

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889198245 Year: Pages: 138 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-824-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Physics (General) --- Geography --- Environmental Sciences --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest of the world's oceanic divisions. It is bounded by the continents of America, Europe and Africa and at its polewards margins by the Arctic and the Southern Oceans. Different climatic patterns can be observed along its large latitudinal domain, which extends from the equator to sub-polar regions. Thus, different tropical and extra-tropical meteorological systems may have some influence on the characterization of precipitation regimes observed surrounding the basin, such as the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), tropical monsoon systems, westerly storm tracks and atmospheric rivers. The subtropical regions of the Azores and South Atlantic high pressure systems are large evaporative areas which act as important moisture sources for the adjacent continents. Variations in the oceanic characteristics may influence the moisture transport towards the neighboring landmasses and alter the precipitation. The influence of climatic variability modes manifest not only over the Atlantic Ocean, but also over other oceanic regions, may also interact with the regional hydrological budget, thereby generating long periods of drought or excessive precipitation over the Atlantic rim landmasses. This Research Topic intends to highlight the advances of the scientific community in investigating the continental precipitation surrounding the Atlantic Ocean and its variability on various temporal and spatial scales.

Hydrological Hazard: Analysis and Prevention

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ISBN: 9783038973744 9783038973751 Year: Pages: 218 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-375-1 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Environmental Sciences --- Meteorology and Climatology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-11-26 10:26:46
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Due to the considerable impacts of hydrological hazards on water resources, natural environments, and human activities, as well as on human health and safety, climate variability and climate change have become key issues for the research community. In fact, a warmer climate, with its heightened climate variability, will increase the risk of hydrological extreme phenomena, such as droughts and floods. The Special Issue “Hydrological Hazard: Analysis and Prevention” presents a collection of scientific contributions that provides a sample of the state-of-the-art and forefront research in this field. In particular, innovative modelling methods for flood hazards, regional flood, and drought analysis and the use of satellite and climate data for drought analysis were the main research and practice targets that the papers published in this Special Issue aimed to address.

Flow and Transformations in Porous Media

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889450770 Year: Pages: 200 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-077-0 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Physics (General) --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-07-06 13:27:36
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Fluid flow in transforming porous rocks, fracture networks, and granular media is a very active interdisciplinary research subject in Physics, Earth Sciences, and Engineering. Examples of natural and engineered processes include hydrocarbon recovery, carbon dioxide geo-sequestration, soil drying and wetting, pollution remediation, soil liquefaction, landslides, dynamics of wet or dry granular media, dynamics of faulting or friction, volcanic eruptions, gas venting in sediments, karst development and speleogenesis, ore deposit development, and radioactive waste disposal. Hydrodynamic flow instabilities and pore scale disorder typically result in complex flow patterning. In transforming media, additional mechanisms come into play: compaction, de-compaction, erosion, segregation, and fracturing lead to changes in permeability over time. Dissolution, precipitation, and chemical reactions between solutes and solids may gradually alter the composition and structure of the solid matrix, either creating or destroying permeable paths for fluid flow. A complex, dynamic feedback thus arises where, on the one hand, the fluid flow affects the characteristics of the porous medium, and on the other hand the changing medium influences the fluid flow. This Research Topic Ebook presents current research illustrating the depth and breadth of ongoing work in the field of flow and transformation in porous media through 15 papers by 72 authors from around the world. The body of work highlights the challenges posed by the vast range of length- and time-scales over which subsurface flow processes occur. Importantly, phenomena from each scale contribute to the larger-scale behavior. The flow of oil and gas in reservoirs, and the flow of groundwater on catchment scale is sensitively linked to pore scale processes and material heterogeneity down to the micrometer scale. The geological features of the same reservoirs and catchments evolved over millions of years, sometimes as a consequence of cracking and fracture growth occurring on the time scale of microseconds. The research presented by the authors of this Research Topic represents a step toward bridging the separation of scales as well as the separation of scientific disciplines so that a more unified picture of flow and transformation in porous media can start to emerge.

Process Simulation of Technical Precipitation Processes - The Influence of Mixing

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ISBN: 9783731507352 Year: Pages: XXIII, 209 p. DOI: 10.5445/KSP/1000076187 Language: ENGLISH
Publisher: KIT Scientific Publishing
Subject: Chemical Engineering
Added to DOAB on : 2019-07-28 18:37:01
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This work develops and shows up methods to tackle multi-scale challenges in particle formation during precipitation crystallization. Firstly, molecular, micro- and meso-scale interactions in confined impinging jet mixers are investigated and simulatively predicted. Secondly, to build up on developed methods, macroscale as present for instance in stirred tank reactors is added to the considerations.

Stochastische Simulation großflächiger, hochwasserrelevanter Niederschlagsereignisse

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Book Series: Wissenschaftliche Berichte des Instituts für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung des Karlsruher Instituts für Technologie ISSN: 01795619 ISBN: 9783731507611 Year: Volume: 76 Pages: V, 264 p. DOI: 10.5445/KSP/1000080495 Language: GERMAN
Publisher: KIT Scientific Publishing
Subject: Astronomy (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-07-28 18:37:01
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The risk estimation of precipitation events with high recurrence periods is difficult due to the limited time scale with meteorological observations. A homogenous distribution of rain gauges, especially in mountainous terrain, is also hardly convertible. In this study an analytical model with a high spatial resolution, designed for stochastic simulations of flood-related precipitation, is developed, evaluated and applied to different investigation areas in Germany.

Mechanismen der Auslösung hochreichender Konvektion im südwestdeutschen Mittelgebirgsraum

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Book Series: Wissenschaftliche Berichte des Instituts für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung des Karlsruher Instituts für Technologie ISSN: 01795619 ISBN: 9783731502036 Year: Volume: 65 Pages: IV, 215 p. DOI: 10.5445/KSP/1000040122 Language: GERMAN
Publisher: KIT Scientific Publishing
Subject: Astronomy (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-07-30 20:01:59
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The study discusses the occurrence of precipitation induced by deep convection in Germany's southwestern low mountain range in summer of 2007. Based on statistical methods and a case study, the mechanisms triggering the precipitation are described. The complex terrain proved to be a significant factor (divergent flow regimes), among others.

Remote Sensing of Precipitation: Volume 1

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ISBN: 9783039212859 / 9783039212866 Year: Pages: 480 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-286-6 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Technology (General) --- General and Civil Engineering --- Environmental Engineering
Added to DOAB on : 2019-08-28 11:21:27
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Precipitation is a well-recognized pillar in global water and energy balances. An accurate and timely understanding of its characteristics at the global, regional, and local scales is indispensable for a clearer understanding of the mechanisms underlying the Earth’s atmosphere–ocean complex system. Precipitation is one of the elements that is documented to be greatly affected by climate change. In its various forms, precipitation comprises a primary source of freshwater, which is vital for the sustainability of almost all human activities. Its socio-economic significance is fundamental in managing this natural resource effectively, in applications ranging from irrigation to industrial and household usage. Remote sensing of precipitation is pursued through a broad spectrum of continuously enriched and upgraded instrumentation, embracing sensors which can be ground-based (e.g., weather radars), satellite-borne (e.g., passive or active space-borne sensors), underwater (e.g., hydrophones), aerial, or ship-borne.

Keywords

GPM --- IMERG --- satellite precipitation adjustment --- numerical weather prediction --- heavy precipitation --- flood-inducing storm --- complex terrain --- precipitation --- geostationary microwave sensors --- polar systems --- synoptic weather types --- drop size distribution (DSD) --- microstructure of rain --- disdrometer --- radar reflectivity–rain rate relationship --- CHIRPS --- CMORPH --- TMPA --- MSWEP --- statistical evaluation --- VIC model --- hydrological simulation --- precipitation --- satellite --- GPM --- TRMM --- CFSR --- PERSIANN --- MSWEP --- streamflow simulation --- lumped models --- Peninsular Spain --- GPM IMERG v5 --- TRMM 3B42 v7 --- precipitation --- evaluation --- Huaihe River basin --- precipitation --- radar --- radiometer --- T-Matrix --- microwave scattering --- quantitative precipitation estimates --- validation --- PERSIANN-CCS --- meteorological radar --- satellite rainfall estimates --- satellite precipitation retrieval --- neural networks --- GPM --- GMI --- remote sensing --- hurricane Harvey --- GPM satellite --- IMERG --- tropical storm rainfall --- gridded radar precipitation --- precipitation --- satellites --- climate models --- regional climate models --- X-band radar --- dual-polarization --- precipitation --- complex terrain --- runoff simulations --- snowfall detection --- snow water path retrieval --- supercooled droplets detection --- GPM Microwave Imager --- Satellite Precipitation Estimates --- GPM --- TRMM --- IMERG --- GSMaP --- TMPA --- CMORPH --- assessment --- Pakistan --- heavy rainfall prediction --- satellite radiance --- data assimilation --- RMAPS --- harmonie model --- radar data assimilation --- pre-processing --- mesoscale precipitation patterns --- GNSS meteorology --- GPS --- Zenith Tropospheric Delay --- precipitable water vapor --- SEID --- single frequency GNSS --- Precise Point Positioning --- low-cost receivers --- goGPS --- GPM --- IMERG --- TRMM --- precipitation --- Cyprus --- satellite precipitation product --- Tianshan Mountains --- GPM --- TRMM --- CMORPH --- heavy precipitation --- rainfall retrieval techniques --- forecast model --- Red–Thai Binh River Basin --- TMPA 3B42V7 --- TMPA 3B42RT --- rainfall --- bias correction --- linear-scaling approach --- climatology --- topography --- precipitation --- remote sensing --- CloudSat --- CMIP --- high latitude --- mineral dust --- wet deposition --- cloud scavenging --- dust washout process --- Saharan dust transportation --- precipitation rate --- precipitating hydrometeor --- hydrometeor classification --- cloud radar --- Ka-band --- thunderstorm --- thundercloud --- vertical air velocity --- terminal velocity --- Milešovka observatory --- rain gauges --- radar --- quality indexes --- satellite rainfall retrievals --- validation --- surface rain intensity --- kriging with external drift --- PEMW --- MSG --- SEVIRI --- downscaling --- tropical cyclone --- rain rate --- precipitation --- remote sensing --- radiometer --- retrieval algorithm --- GPM --- DPR --- validation network --- volume matching --- reflectivity --- rainfall rate --- TRMM-era TMPA --- GPM-era IMERG --- satellite rainfall estimate --- Mainland China --- satellite precipitation --- Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) --- IMERG --- TRMM-TMPA --- Ensemble Precipitation (EP) algorithm --- topographical and seasonal evaluation --- daily rainfall estimations --- TRMM 3B42 v7 --- rain gauges --- Amazon Basin --- regional rainfall regimes --- regional rainfall sub-regimes --- TRMM 3B42 V7 --- CMORPH_CRT --- PERSIANN_CDR --- GR models --- hydrological simulation --- Red River Basin --- satellite precipitation --- Tibetan Plateau --- GPM --- IMERG --- GSMaP --- precipitation --- weather --- radar --- GPM --- RADOLAN --- QPE --- TRMM --- TMPA --- 3B42 --- validation --- rainfall --- telemetric rain gauge --- Lai Nullah --- Pakistan --- XPOL radar --- GPM/IMERG --- WRF-Hydro --- CHAOS --- hydrometeorology --- flash flood --- Mandra --- typhoon --- IMERG --- GSMaP --- Southern China --- precipitation --- satellite remote sensing --- error analysis --- triple collocation --- precipitation --- TRMM --- GPM --- IMERG --- weather radar --- precipitable water vapor --- precipitation retrieval --- rain rate --- QPE

Remote Sensing of Precipitation: Volume 2

Author:
ISBN: 9783039212873 / 9783039212880 Year: Pages: 318 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-288-0 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Technology (General) --- General and Civil Engineering --- Environmental Engineering
Added to DOAB on : 2019-08-28 11:21:27
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Abstract

Precipitation is a well-recognized pillar in global water and energy balances. An accurate and timely understanding of its characteristics at the global, regional, and local scales is indispensable for a clearer understanding of the mechanisms underlying the Earth’s atmosphere–ocean complex system. Precipitation is one of the elements that is documented to be greatly affected by climate change. In its various forms, precipitation comprises a primary source of freshwater, which is vital for the sustainability of almost all human activities. Its socio-economic significance is fundamental in managing this natural resource effectively, in applications ranging from irrigation to industrial and household usage. Remote sensing of precipitation is pursued through a broad spectrum of continuously enriched and upgraded instrumentation, embracing sensors which can be ground-based (e.g., weather radars), satellite-borne (e.g., passive or active space-borne sensors), underwater (e.g., hydrophones), aerial, or ship-borne.

Keywords

GPM --- IMERG --- satellite precipitation adjustment --- numerical weather prediction --- heavy precipitation --- flood-inducing storm --- complex terrain --- precipitation --- geostationary microwave sensors --- polar systems --- synoptic weather types --- drop size distribution (DSD) --- microstructure of rain --- disdrometer --- radar reflectivity–rain rate relationship --- CHIRPS --- CMORPH --- TMPA --- MSWEP --- statistical evaluation --- VIC model --- hydrological simulation --- precipitation --- satellite --- GPM --- TRMM --- CFSR --- PERSIANN --- MSWEP --- streamflow simulation --- lumped models --- Peninsular Spain --- GPM IMERG v5 --- TRMM 3B42 v7 --- precipitation --- evaluation --- Huaihe River basin --- precipitation --- radar --- radiometer --- T-Matrix --- microwave scattering --- quantitative precipitation estimates --- validation --- PERSIANN-CCS --- meteorological radar --- satellite rainfall estimates --- satellite precipitation retrieval --- neural networks --- GPM --- GMI --- remote sensing --- hurricane Harvey --- GPM satellite --- IMERG --- tropical storm rainfall --- gridded radar precipitation --- precipitation --- satellites --- climate models --- regional climate models --- X-band radar --- dual-polarization --- precipitation --- complex terrain --- runoff simulations --- snowfall detection --- snow water path retrieval --- supercooled droplets detection --- GPM Microwave Imager --- Satellite Precipitation Estimates --- GPM --- TRMM --- IMERG --- GSMaP --- TMPA --- CMORPH --- assessment --- Pakistan --- heavy rainfall prediction --- satellite radiance --- data assimilation --- RMAPS --- harmonie model --- radar data assimilation --- pre-processing --- mesoscale precipitation patterns --- GNSS meteorology --- GPS --- Zenith Tropospheric Delay --- precipitable water vapor --- SEID --- single frequency GNSS --- Precise Point Positioning --- low-cost receivers --- goGPS --- GPM --- IMERG --- TRMM --- precipitation --- Cyprus --- satellite precipitation product --- Tianshan Mountains --- GPM --- TRMM --- CMORPH --- heavy precipitation --- rainfall retrieval techniques --- forecast model --- Red–Thai Binh River Basin --- TMPA 3B42V7 --- TMPA 3B42RT --- rainfall --- bias correction --- linear-scaling approach --- climatology --- topography --- precipitation --- remote sensing --- CloudSat --- CMIP --- high latitude --- mineral dust --- wet deposition --- cloud scavenging --- dust washout process --- Saharan dust transportation --- precipitation rate --- precipitating hydrometeor --- hydrometeor classification --- cloud radar --- Ka-band --- thunderstorm --- thundercloud --- vertical air velocity --- terminal velocity --- Milešovka observatory --- rain gauges --- radar --- quality indexes --- satellite rainfall retrievals --- validation --- surface rain intensity --- kriging with external drift --- PEMW --- MSG --- SEVIRI --- downscaling --- tropical cyclone --- rain rate --- precipitation --- remote sensing --- radiometer --- retrieval algorithm --- GPM --- DPR --- validation network --- volume matching --- reflectivity --- rainfall rate --- TRMM-era TMPA --- GPM-era IMERG --- satellite rainfall estimate --- Mainland China --- satellite precipitation --- Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) --- IMERG --- TRMM-TMPA --- Ensemble Precipitation (EP) algorithm --- topographical and seasonal evaluation --- daily rainfall estimations --- TRMM 3B42 v7 --- rain gauges --- Amazon Basin --- regional rainfall regimes --- regional rainfall sub-regimes --- TRMM 3B42 V7 --- CMORPH_CRT --- PERSIANN_CDR --- GR models --- hydrological simulation --- Red River Basin --- satellite precipitation --- Tibetan Plateau --- GPM --- IMERG --- GSMaP --- precipitation --- weather --- radar --- GPM --- RADOLAN --- QPE --- TRMM --- TMPA --- 3B42 --- validation --- rainfall --- telemetric rain gauge --- Lai Nullah --- Pakistan --- XPOL radar --- GPM/IMERG --- WRF-Hydro --- CHAOS --- hydrometeorology --- flash flood --- Mandra --- typhoon --- IMERG --- GSMaP --- Southern China --- precipitation --- satellite remote sensing --- error analysis --- triple collocation --- precipitation --- TRMM --- GPM --- IMERG --- weather radar --- precipitable water vapor --- precipitation retrieval --- rain rate --- QPE

Earth Observation for Water Resource Management in Africa

Authors: --- --- ---
ISBN: 9783038421535 9783038421542 Year: Pages: XVIII, 538 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03842-154-2 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Added to DOAB on : 2016-05-20 14:55:31
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Reliable access to water, managing the spatial and temporal variability of water availability, ensuring the quality of freshwater and responding to climatological changes in the hydrological cycle are prerequisites for the development of countries in Africa. Water being an essential input for biomass growth and for renewable energy production (e.g. biofuels and hydropower schemes) plays an integral part in ensuring food and energy security for any nation. Water, as a source of safe drinking water, is furthermore the basis for ensuring the health of citizens and plays an important role in urban sanitation.The concept of Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) is seen as an opportunity to help manage water variability and the wide spread water scarcity in Africa. One key component missing from IWRM in Africa is the limited knowledge of the available extent and quality of water resources at basin level. Earth Observation (EO) technology can help fill this information gap by assessing and monitoring water resources at adequate temporal and spatial scales. The goal of this Special Issue is to understand and demonstrate the contribution which satellite observations, consistent over space and time, can bring to improve water resource management in Africa. Possible EO products and applications range from catchment characterization, water quality monitoring, soil moisture assessment, water extent and level monitoring, irrigation services, urban and agricultural water demand modeling, evapotranspiration estimation, ground water management, to hydrological modeling and flood mapping/forecasting. Some of these EO applications have already been developed by African scientists within the 10 year lifetime of the TIGER initiative: Looking after Water in Africa (http://www.tiger.esa.int), whose contributions are intended to be the starting point of this Special Issue and is only one example of the wide range of activities in the field. Contributions from the entire African and international scientific community dealing with the challenges of water resource management in Africa are the target of the special issue.

The Atmosphere over Mountainous Regions

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889450169 Year: Pages: 160 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-016-9 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Geography
Added to DOAB on : 2018-02-27 16:16:44
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Mountainous regions occupy a significant fraction of the Earth’s continents and are characterized by specific meteorological phenomena operating on a wide range of scales. Being a home to large human populations, the impact of mountains on weather and hydrology has significant practical consequences. Mountains modulate the climate and create micro-climates, induce different types of thermally and dynamically driven circulations, generate atmospheric waves of various scales (known as mountain waves), and affect the boundary layer characteristics and the dispersion of pollutants. At the local scale, strong downslope winds linked with mountain waves (such as the Foehn and Bora) can cause severe damage. Mountain wave breaking in the high atmosphere is a source of Clear Air Turbulence, and lee wave rotors are a major near-surface aviation hazard. Mountains also act to block strongly-stratified air layers, leading to the formation of valley cold-air pools (with implications for road safety, pollution, crop damage, etc.) and gap flows. Presently, neither the fine-scale structure of orographic precipitation nor the initiation of deep convection by mountainous terrain can be resolved adequately by regional-to global-scale models, requiring appropriate downscaling or parameterization. Additionally, the shortest mountain waves need to be parameterized in global weather and climate prediction models, because they exert a drag on the atmosphere. This drag not only decelerates the global atmospheric circulation, but also affects temperatures in the polar stratosphere, which control ozone depletion. It is likely that both mountain wave drag and orographic precipitation lead to non-trivial feedbacks in climate change scenarios. Measurement campaigns such as MAP, T-REX, Materhorn, COLPEX and i-Box provided a wealth of mountain meteorology field data, which is only starting to be explored. Recent advances in computing power allow numerical simulations of unprecedented resolution, e.g. LES modelling of rotors, mountain wave turbulence, and boundary layers in mountainous regions. This will lead to important advances in understanding these phenomena, as well as mixing and pollutant dispersion over complex terrain, or the onset and breakdown of cold-air pools. On the other hand, recent analyses of global circulation biases point towards missing drag, especially in the southern hemisphere, which may be due to processes currently neglected in parameterizations. A better understanding of flow over orography is also crucial for a better management of wind power and a more effective use of data assimilation over complex terrain. This Research Topic includes contributions that aim to shed light on a number of these issues, using theory, numerical modelling, field measurements, and laboratory experiments.

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