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Abiotic Stress Effects on Performance of Horticultural Crops

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ISBN: 9783039217502 / 9783039217519 Year: Volume: 1 Pages: 126 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-751-9 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Agriculture (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-11-05 10:43:33
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Horticultural crop yield and quality depend on genotype, environmental conditions, and production management. In particular, adverse environmental conditions may greatly affect crop performance, reducing crop yield by 50%–70%. Abiotic stresses such as cold, heat, drought, flooding, salinity, nutrient deficiency, and ultraviolet radiation affect multiple physiological and biochemical mechanisms in plants as they attempt to cope with the stress conditions. However, different crop species can have different sensitivities or tolerances to specific abiotic stresses. Tolerant plants may activate different strategies to adapt to or avoid the negative effect of abiotic stresses. At the physiological level, photosynthetic activity and light-use efficiency of plants may be modulated to enhance tolerance against the stress. At the biochemical level, several antioxidant systems may be activated, and many enzymes may produce stress-related metabolites to help avoid cellular damage, including compounds such as proline, glycine betaine, and amino acids. Within each crop species there is a wide variability of tolerance to abiotic stresses, and some wild relatives may carry useful traits for enhancing the tolerance to abiotic stresses in their progeny through either traditional or biotechnological breeding. The research papers and reviews presented in this book provide an update of the scientific knowledge of crop interactions with abiotic stresses.

MicroRNA as Biomarkers in Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy

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ISBN: 9783039212491 / 9783039212507 Year: Pages: 166 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-250-7 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Microbiology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-08-28 11:21:27
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This Special Issue celebrates the 25th anniversary of the discovery of the first microRNA. The size of the microRNome and complexity of animal body plans and organ systems suggests a role for microRNAs in cell fate determination and differentiation. More than 2000 sequences have been proposed to represent unique microRNA genes in humans, with an increasing number of mechanistic roles identified in developmental, physiological, and pathological processes. Thus, dysregulation of a few key microRNAs can have a profound global effect on the gene expression and molecular programs of a cell. This great potential for clinical intervention has captured the interest and imagination of researchers in many fields. However, very few fields have been as prolific as the field of cancer research. This Special Issue provides but a glimpse of the large body of literature of microRNA biology in cancer research, containing 4 original research studies and 4 review articles that focus on specific hematologic or solid tumors in disease. Collectively, these articles highlight state-of-the-art approaches and methodologies for microRNA detection in tissue, blood, and other body fluids in a range of biomarkers applications, from early cancer detection to prognosis and treatment response. The articles also address some of the challenges regarding clinical implementation.

Environmental Fate of Emerging Organic Micro-Contaminants

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ISBN: 9783039213672 / 9783039213689 Year: Pages: 128 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-368-9 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Environmental Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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The toxicity and fate of pharmaceuticals and other emerging micro-organic contaminants in the natural and built environments have been the focus of much research over the last twenty years. Particular focus has recently centred on the fate of antimicrobial chemicals, including antibiotics and antifungals. The occurrence of such chemicals in the environment is thought to contribute to the selection of resistance in exposed microorganisms.This Special Issue (SI) brings together a broad range of recent advances in the field of emerging micro-organic contaminants, ranging from medicinal contaminants to industrial chemicals in the environment. Notably, these range from chemical extraction and large-scale analysis to adverse effects on non-target aquatic organisms and potential risk to humans via contaminated foodstuffs. Additionally, this Special Issue also presents novel contaminant treatment/degradation methods of both physical and biological nature.

Dinophysis Toxins: Distribution, Fate in Shellfish and Impacts

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ISBN: 9783039213634 / 9783039213641 Year: Pages: 376 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-364-1 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Public Health
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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Several species of Dinophysis produce one or two groups of lipophilic toxins: okadaic acid (OA) and its derivatives; or the dinophysistoxins (DTXs) (also known as diarrhetic shellfish poisons or DSP toxins) and pectenotoxins (PTXs). DSP toxins are potent inhibitors of protein phosphatases, causing gastrointestinal intoxication in consumers of contaminated seafood. Forty years after the identification of Dinophysis as the causative agent of DSP in Japan, contamination of filter feeding shellfish exposed to Dinophysis blooms is recognized as a problem worldwide. DSP events affect public health and cause considerable losses to the shellfish industry. Costly monitoring programs are implemented in regions with relevant shellfish production to prevent these socioeconomic impacts. Harvest closures are enforced whenever toxin levels exceed regulatory limits (RLs). Dinophysis species are kleptoplastidic dinoflagellates; they feed on ciliates (Mesodinium genus) that have previously acquired plastids from cryptophycean (genera Teleaulax, Plagioselmis, and Geminigera) nanoflagellates. The interactions of Dinophysis with different prey regulate their growth and toxin production. When Dinophysis cells are ingested by shellfish, their toxins are partially biotransformed and bioaccumulated, rendering the shellfish unsuitable for human consumption. DSP toxins may also affect shellfish metabolism. This book covers diverse aspects of the abovementioned topics—from the laboratory culture of Dinophysis and the kinetics of uptake, transformation, and depuration of DSP toxins in shellfish to Dinophysis population dynamics, the monitoring and regulation of DSP toxins, and their impact on the shellfish industry in some of the aquaculture regions that are traditionally most affected, namely, northeastern Japan, western Europe, southern Chile, and New Zealand.

Keywords

harmful algal bloom --- Diarrheic Shellfish Poisoning --- okadaic acid --- toxin accumulation --- toxin vectors --- trophic transfer --- Brazil --- diarrhetic shellfish toxins (DST) --- Mytilus galloprovincialis --- DST accumulation --- DST esterification --- suspended particulate matter (SPM) --- harmful algal blooms --- okadaic acid --- Argopecten irradians --- transcriptomic response --- deep sequencing --- pectenotoxins --- surf clam --- accumulation --- biotransformation --- depuration --- diarrhetic shellfish toxins --- accumulation --- dinophysistoxin --- Japanese scallop --- dinophysis --- LC/MS/MS --- statistical analysis --- Dinophysis --- HAB monitoring --- DSP toxins --- aquaculture --- shellfish toxicity --- human health --- time-series --- seasonality --- Scotland --- DSP toxins --- bivalves --- mussel --- resistance --- RNA-Seq --- qPCR --- metabolism --- defense --- immunity --- DSP toxins --- pectenotoxins --- Dinophysis acuminata --- Mesodinium rubrum --- bacterial community --- high throughput sequencing --- diarrhetic shellfish toxins --- Dinophysis --- wild harvest --- bivalve shellfish --- pipis (Plebidonax deltoides) --- Sydney rock oyster (Saccostrea glomerata) --- okadaic acid --- pectenotoxins --- Dinophysis toxins --- accumulation --- digestion --- biotransformation --- compartmentalization --- depuration --- kinetics --- Dinophysis --- diarrhetic shellfish poisoning --- marine toxins --- pectenotoxin --- okadaic acid --- dinophysistoxin --- okadaic acid --- pectenotoxins --- Dinophysis --- D. acuminata-complex --- D. caudata --- Argopecten purpuratus --- Dinophysis --- Mesodinium --- cryptophytes --- predator-prey preferences --- Diarrhetic Shellfish Toxins (DST) --- pectenotoxins (PTXs) --- mixotrophic cultures --- mass culture conditions --- Dinophysis acuminata --- Protoceratium reticulatum --- Reloncaví Fjord --- OMI analysis --- WitOMI analysis --- Mesodinium cf. rubrum --- El Niño Southern Oscillation --- Southern Annual Mode --- Dinophysis acuta --- Dinophysis acuminata --- DSP --- physical–biological interactions --- niche partitioning --- climatic anomaly --- Dinophysis acuminata --- Mesodinium rubrum --- lysate --- organic matter --- diarrhetic shellfish poisoning --- okadaic acid --- dinophysistoxin --- pectenotoxins --- dinophysis --- DSP --- toxins --- OA --- DTX-2 --- PTXs --- Dinophysis acuminata --- dinophysistoxins --- pectenotoxins --- Port Underwood --- New Zealand --- Dinophysis --- Diarrhetic shellfish toxins --- marine biotoxins --- blooms --- n/a

Plant Proteomic Research 2.0

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ISBN: 9783039210626 / 9783039210633 Year: Pages: 594 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-063-3 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Plant Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-26 08:44:07
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Advancements in high-throughput “Omics” techniques have revolutionized plant molecular biology research. Proteomics offers one of the best options for the functional analysis of translated regions of the genome, generating a wealth of detailed information regarding the intrinsic mechanisms of plant stress responses. Various proteomic approaches are being exploited extensively for elucidating master regulator proteins which play key roles in stress perception and signaling, and these approaches largely involve gel-based and gel-free techniques, including both label-based and label-free protein quantification. Furthermore, post-translational modifications, subcellular localization, and protein–protein interactions provide deeper insight into protein molecular function. Their diverse applications contribute to the revelation of new insights into plant molecular responses to various biotic and abiotic stressors.

Keywords

Phalaenopsis --- petal --- pollination --- senescence --- 2-DE --- ROS --- Medicago sativa --- leaf cell wall proteome --- cadmium --- quantitative proteomics --- 2D DIGE --- chloroplast --- elevated CO2 --- heat stress --- nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase --- (phospho)-proteomics --- photosynthesis --- protein phosphorylation --- 14-3-3 proteins --- Oryza sativa L. --- starch --- sucrose --- N utilization efficiency --- proteomics --- 2D --- protein phosphatase --- rice isogenic line --- SnRK1 --- 14-3-3 --- lettuce --- bolting --- proteome --- high temperature --- iTRAQ --- proteome profiling --- iTRAQ --- differentially abundant proteins (DAPs) --- drought stress --- physiological responses --- Zea mays L. --- GS3 --- ? subunit --- heterotrimeric G protein --- mass spectrometric analysis --- RGG3 --- rice --- western blotting --- Dn1-1 --- ?-subunit --- heterotrimeric G protein --- mass spectrometry analysis --- RGG4 --- rice --- western blotting --- Clematis terniflora DC. --- polyphenol oxidase --- virus induced gene silencing --- photosynthesis --- glycolysis --- Camellia sinensis --- chlorotic mutation --- chlorophyll deficiency --- weakening of carbon metabolism --- iTRAQ --- proteomics --- degradome --- wheat --- cultivar --- protease --- papain-like cysteine protease (PLCP) --- subtilase --- metacaspase --- caspase-like --- wheat leaf rust --- Puccinia recondita --- Stagonospora nodorum --- iTRAQ --- proteomics --- somatic embryogenesis --- pyruvate biosynthesis --- Zea mays --- chlorophylls --- LC-MS-based proteomics --- pea (Pisum sativum L.) --- proteome functional annotation --- proteome map --- seeds --- seed proteomics --- late blight disease --- potato proteomics --- Phytophthora infestans --- Sarpo Mira --- early and late disease stages --- Simmondsia chinensis --- cold stress --- proteomics --- leaf --- iTRAQ --- Ricinus communis L. --- cold stress --- seed imbibition --- iTRAQ --- proteomics --- Morus --- organ --- gel-free/label-free proteomics --- flavonoid --- antioxidant activity --- phosphoproteome --- barley --- seed dormancy --- germination --- imbibition --- after-ripening --- sugarcane --- Sporisorium scitamineum --- smut --- proteomics --- RT-qPCR --- ISR --- holm oak --- Quercus ilex --- 2-DE proteomics --- shotgun proteomics --- non-orthodox seed --- population variability --- stresses responses --- ammonium --- Arabidopsis thaliana --- carbon metabolism --- nitrogen metabolism --- nitrate --- proteomics --- root --- secondary metabolism --- proteomics --- wheat --- silver nanoparticles --- plant pathogenesis responses --- data-independent acquisition --- quantitative proteomics --- Pseudomonas syringae --- sweet potato plants infected by SPFMV --- SPV2 and SPVG --- sweet potato plants non-infected by SPFMV --- SPV2 and SPVG --- co-infection --- transcriptome profiling --- gene ontology --- pathway analysis --- lesion mimic mutant --- leaf spot --- phenylpropanoid biosynthesis --- proteomics --- isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) --- rice --- affinity chromatography --- ergosterol --- fungal perception --- innate immunity --- pattern recognition receptors --- plasma membrane --- proteomics --- proteomics --- maize --- plant-derived smoke --- shoot --- Solanum tuberosum --- patatin --- seed storage proteins --- vegetative storage proteins --- tuber phosphoproteome --- targeted two-dimensional electrophoresis --- B. acuminata petals --- MALDI-TOF/TOF --- GC-TOF-MS --- qRT-PCR --- differential proteins --- n/a

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