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Ethylene's Role in Plant Mineral Nutrition

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889199464 Year: Pages: 151 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-946-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Botany
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Terrestrial plants are sessile organisms that, differently from animals, can not move in searching of the nutrients and water they need. Instead, they have to change continuously their physiology and morphology to adapt to the environmental changes. When plants suffer from a nutrient deficiency, they develop physiological and morphological responses (mainly in their roots) aimed to facilitate the acquisition and mobilization of such a nutrient. Physiological responses include some ones like acidification of the rizhosphere and release of chelating agents into the medium; and morphological responses include others, like changes in root architecture and development of root hairs. The regulation of these responses is not totally known but in the last years different plant hormones and signaling substances, such as auxin, ethylene, cytokinins and nitric oxide, have been involved in their control. Besides hormones, oxidative stress has also been related with most of the nutrient deficiencies. The relationship of ethylene with the regulation of responses to nutrient deficiencies came from the nineties, when some works presented data suggesting its involvement in the regulation of responses to Fe and P deficiency. In the last years, the role of ethylene has been extended to many other nutrient deficiencies, such as K deficiency, Mg deficiency, S deficiency, N deficiency, and others. In most of the cases, it has been found that ethylene production, as well as the expression of ethylene synthesis genes, increases under these nutrient deficiencies. Furthermore, it has also been found that ethylene controls the expression of genes related to responses to different deficiencies. The involvement of ethylene in so many deficiencies suggests that it should act in conjunction with other signals that would confer nutrient-specificity to the distinct nutrient responses. These other signals could be plant hormones (auxin, cytokinins, etc) as well as other substances (nitric oxide, microRNAs, peptides, glutathione, etc), either originated in the roots or coming from the shoots through the phloem. The role of ethylene in the mineral nutrition of plants is even more complex that the one related to its role in the responses to nutrient deficiencies. Ethylene has also been implicated in the N2 fixation of legume plants; in salt tolerance responses; and in responses to heavy metals, such as Cd toxicity. All these processes are related to ion uptake and, consequently, are related to plant mineral nutrition. We consider a good opportunity to review all this information in a coordinated way. This Research Topic will provide an overview about the role of the plant hormone ethylene on the regulation of physiological and morphological responses to different nutrient deficiencies. In addition, it will cover other aspects of ethylene related to plant nutrition such as its role on salinity, N2 fixation and tolerance to heavy metals.

Keywords

Boron --- ethylene --- heavy metals --- Iron --- Nitrogen --- nodulation --- Phosphate --- Potassium --- Salinity --- Sulfur

Forage Plant Ecophysiology

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ISBN: 9783038424888 9783038424895 Year: Pages: XVI, 206 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03842-489-5 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Agriculture (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-08-17 13:01:36
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Forage plant ecophysiology has been described, perhaps mischievously, as the selective application of useful information from pure plant physiology research to provide human benefit through improved agricultural output. The intention of creating this Special Issue was to create a volume that future researchers will find user friendly and want to consult, while ensuring it is rich in scientific quality. Contributions were sought that provide a broad geographic representation and a snapshot of present knowledge and research on a range of forage species in use around the world.

Plants; Stress & Proteins

Authors: --- --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889452675 Year: Pages: 323 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-267-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Botany
Added to DOAB on : 2018-02-27 16:16:44
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Biotic and abiotic stress factors deliver a huge impact on plant life. Biotic stress factors such as damage through pathogens or herbivore attack, as well as abiotic stress factors like variation in temperature, rainfall and salinity, have placed the plant kingdom under constant challenges for survival. As a consequence, global agricultural and horticultural productivity has been disturbed to a large extent. Being sessile in nature, plants cannot escape from the stress, and instead adapt changes within their system to overcome the adverse conditions. These changes include physiological, developmental and biochemical alterations within the plant body which influences the genome, proteome and metabolome profiles of the plant. Since proteins are the ultimate players of cellular behavior, proteome level alterations during and recovery period of stress provide direct implications of plant responses towards stress factors. With current advancement of modern high-throughput technologies, much research has been carried out in this field. This e-book highlights the research and review articles that cover proteome level changes during the course or recovery period of various stress factors in plant life. Overall, the chapters in this e-book has provided a wealth of information on how plants deal with stress from a proteomics perspective.

Salinity Tolerance in Plants: Mechanisms and Regulation of Ion Transport

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889453696 Year: Pages: 243 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-369-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Botany
Added to DOAB on : 2018-02-27 16:16:45
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Life presumably arose in the primeval oceans with similar or even greater salinity than the present ocean, so the ancient cells were designed to withstand salinity. However, the immediate ancestors of land plants most likely lived in fresh, or slightly brackish, water. The fresh/brackish water origins might explain why many land plants, including some cereals, can withstand moderate salinity, but only 1 – 2 % of all the higher plant species were able to re-discover their saline origins again and survive at increased salinities close to that of seawater. From a practical side, salinity is among the major threats to agriculture, having been one of the reasons for the demise of the ancient Mesopotamian Sumer civilisation and in the present time causing huge annual economic losses of over 10 billion USD. The effects of salinity on plants include osmotic stress, disruption of membrane ion transport, direct toxicity of high cytoplasmic concentrations of sodium and chloride on cellular processes and induced oxidative stress. Ion transport is the crucial starting point that determines salinity tolerance in plants. Transport via membranes is mediated mostly by the ion channels and transporters, which ensure selective passage of specific ions. The molecular and structural diversity of these ion channels and transporters is amazing. Obtaining the detailed descriptions of distinct ion channels and transporters present in halophytes, marine algae and salt-tolerant fungi and then progressing to the cellular and the whole organism mechanisms, is one of the logical ways to understand high salinity tolerance. Transfer of the genes from halophytes to agricultural crops is a means to increase salt tolerance of the crops. The theoretical scientific approaches involve protein chemistry, structure-function relations of membrane proteins, synthetic biology, systems biology and physiology of stress and ion homeostasis. At the time of compiling this e-book many aspects of ion transport under salinity stress are not yet well understood. The e-book has attracted researchers in ion transport and salinity tolerance. We have combined our efforts to achieve a wider, more detailed understanding of salt tolerance in plants mediated by ion transport, to understand present and future ways to modify and manipulate ion transport and salinity tolerance and also to find natural limits for the modifications.

Abiotic Stress Effects on Performance of Horticultural Crops

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783039217502/9783039217519 Year: Volume: 1 Pages: 126 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-11-05 10:43:33
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Horticultural crop yield and quality depend on genotype, environmental conditions, and production management. In particular, adverse environmental conditions may greatly affect crop performance, reducing crop yield by 50%–70%. Abiotic stresses such as cold, heat, drought, flooding, salinity, nutrient deficiency, and ultraviolet radiation affect multiple physiological and biochemical mechanisms in plants as they attempt to cope with the stress conditions. However, different crop species can have different sensitivities or tolerances to specific abiotic stresses. Tolerant plants may activate different strategies to adapt to or avoid the negative effect of abiotic stresses. At the physiological level, photosynthetic activity and light-use efficiency of plants may be modulated to enhance tolerance against the stress. At the biochemical level, several antioxidant systems may be activated, and many enzymes may produce stress-related metabolites to help avoid cellular damage, including compounds such as proline, glycine betaine, and amino acids. Within each crop species there is a wide variability of tolerance to abiotic stresses, and some wild relatives may carry useful traits for enhancing the tolerance to abiotic stresses in their progeny through either traditional or biotechnological breeding. The research papers and reviews presented in this book provide an update of the scientific knowledge of crop interactions with abiotic stresses.

Biotic and Abiotic Stress Responses in Crop Plants

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ISBN: 9783038974635 / 9783038974642 Year: Pages: 252 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-464-2 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Plant Sciences --- Genetics --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-16 10:24:11
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While the demand for crop products continues to increase strongly, agricultural productivity is threatened by various stress factors, often associated with global warming. To sustain and improve yield, it is necessary to understand how plants respond to various stresses, and to use the generated knowledge in modern breeding programs. Most knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms associated with stress responses has been obtained from investigations using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Stress hormones, such as abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid, have been shown to play key roles in defense responses against abiotic and biotic stresses. More recently, evidence that growth-regulating plant hormones are also involved in stress responses has been accumulating. Epigenetic regulation at the DNA and histone level, and gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs appear to be important as well. Many approaches have used mutant screens and next generation sequencing approaches to identify key players and mechanisms how plants respond to their environment. However, it is often unclear to which extent the elucidated mechanisms also operate in crops.This Special Issue Book, therefore, aims to close this gap and contains a number of contributions from labs that work both, on Arabidopsis and crops. The book includes contributions reporting how crop plant species respond to various abiotic stresses, such as drought, heat, cold, flooding, and salinity, as well as biotic stimuli during microbial infections. It contains reviews, opinions, perspectives, and original articles, and its focus is on our molecular understanding of biotic and abiotic stress responses in crops, highlighting, among other aspects, the role of stress hormones, secondary metabolites, signaling mechanisms, and changes in gene expression patterns and their regulation. Approaches and ideas to achieve stress tolerance and to maintain yield stability of agricultural crops during stress periods can be found in most chapters. These include also perspectives on how knowledge from model plants can be utilized to facilitate crop-plant breeding and biotechnology.

Salinity Tolerance in Plants

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ISBN: 9783039210268 / 9783039210275 Year: Pages: 422 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-027-5 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Biochemistry
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-26 10:09:00
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Salt stress is one of the most damaging abiotic stresses because most crop plants are susceptible to salinity to different degrees. According to the FAO, about 800 million Has of land are affected by salinity worldwide. Unfortunately, this situation will worsen in the context of climate change, where there will be an overall increase in temperature and a decrease in average annual rainfall worldwide. This Special Issue presents different research works and reviews on the response of plants to salinity, focused from different points of view: physiological, biochemical, and molecular levels. Although an important part of the studies on the response to salinity have been carried out with Arabidopsis plants, the use of other species with agronomic interest is also notable, including woody plants. Most of the conducted studies in this Special Issue were focused on the identification and characterization of candidate genes for salt tolerance in higher plants. This identification would provide valuable information about the molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in the salt tolerance response, and it also supplies important resources to breeding programs for salt tolerance in plants.

Keywords

Arabidopsis --- Brassica napus --- ion homeostasis --- melatonin --- NaCl stress --- nitric oxide --- redox homeostasis --- Chlamydomonas reinhardtii --- bZIP transcription factors --- salt stress --- transcriptional regulation --- photosynthesis --- lipid accumulation --- Apocyni Veneti Folium --- salt stress --- multiple bioactive constituents --- physiological changes --- multivariate statistical analysis --- banana (Musa acuminata L.) --- ROP --- genome-wide identification --- abiotic stress --- salt stress --- MaROP5g --- rice --- genome-wide association study --- salt stress --- germination --- natural variation --- Chlamydomonas reinhardtii --- salt stress --- transcriptome analysis --- impairment of photosynthesis --- underpinnings of salt stress responses --- chlorophyll fluorescence --- J8-1 plum line --- mandelonitrile --- Prunus domestica --- redox signalling --- salicylic acid --- salt-stress --- soluble nutrients --- Arabidopsis thaliana --- VOZ --- transcription factor --- salt stress --- transcriptional activator --- chlorophyll fluorescence --- lipid peroxidation --- Na+ --- photosynthesis --- photosystem --- RNA binding protein --- nucleolin --- salt stress --- photosynthesis --- light saturation point --- booting stage --- transcriptome --- grapevine --- salt stress --- ROS detoxification --- phytohormone --- transcription factors --- Arabidopsis --- CDPK --- ion homeostasis --- NMT --- ROS --- salt stress --- antioxidant enzymes --- Arabidopsis thaliana --- ascorbate cycle --- hydrogen peroxide --- reactive oxygen species --- salinity --- SnRK2 --- RNA-seq --- DEUs --- flax --- NaCl stress --- EST-SSR --- Salt stress --- Oryza sativa --- proteomics --- iTRAQ quantification --- cell membrane injury --- root activity --- antioxidant systems --- ion homeostasis --- melatonin --- salt stress --- signal pathway --- SsMAX2 --- Sapium sebiferum --- drought, osmotic stress --- salt stress --- redox homeostasis --- strigolactones --- ABA --- TGase --- photosynthesis --- salt stress --- polyamines --- cucumber --- abiotic stresses --- high salinity --- HKT1 --- halophytes --- glycophytes --- poplars (Populus) --- salt tolerance --- molecular mechanisms --- SOS --- ROS --- Capsicum annuum L. --- CaDHN5 --- salt stress --- osmotic stress --- dehydrin --- Gossypium arboretum --- salt tolerance --- single nucleotide polymorphisms --- association mapping. --- n/a

Colloids and Interfaces in Oil Recovery

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ISBN: 9783039211067 / 9783039211074 Year: Pages: 234 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-107-4 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-26 08:44:06
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It is well-known that colloid and interface science and petroleum production are inextricably linked. Whether in the reservoir, with its porous structure, or during recovery, crude oil is intimately associated with rock surfaces and with water, often in the form of emulsions. This situation leads to highly complex systems, comprising multiple colloids and interfaces, which require to be optimized if oil is to be recovered efficiently, both in terms of economic cost and with due concern for the environment. This book contains a compilation of contemporary research topics which illustrate various aspects of the importance of colloids and interfaces in crude oil recovery through modifying conditions between the rock, crude oil, and water in the reservoir, in order to achieve improved oil recovery. The specific topics covered relate both to conventional oils, in which waterflooding is the most common secondary and tertiary means of recovery, and to non-conventional heavy oil and natural bitumen, which require thermal recovery methods, owing to their high viscosity.

Selected Papers from the 15th Estuarine and Coastal Modeling Conference

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ISBN: 9783039212699 / 9783039212705 Year: Pages: 432 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-270-5 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Geography
Added to DOAB on : 2019-08-28 11:21:27
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The 15th Estuarine and Coastal Modeling Conference provides a venue for commercial, academic, and government scientists and engineers from around the world to present and discuss the latest results and techniques in applied estuarine and coastal modeling. Prospective authors are invited to submit papers on a wide range of topic areas, including:• Pollutant Transport and Water Quality Prediction• Coastal Response to Climate Change• Modeling Techniques and Sensitivity Studies• Model Assessment• Modeling Specific Estuarine and Coastal Systems• Visualization and Analysis• Wave and Sediment Transport Modeling• Modeling of Chemicals and Floatables• Oil Spill Transport and Fate Modeling• Inverse Methods• Circulation Modeling• Facility Siting and CSO Studies• Data Assimilation• Nowcast/Forecast Modeling Systems• Modeling Systems with Strong Buoyancy Forcing• Modeling of Coupled Systems• Risk Analysis (Nuclear Reactors, Flood Forecasting)

Keywords

British Columbia --- environmental assessment --- marine construction --- circulation --- numerical model --- sediment model --- tidal current --- wind-driven current --- stratification --- initial dilution zone --- property-carrying particle model --- coupled models --- ecosystem simulation --- biophysical modeling --- Sandusky Bay --- Great Lakes --- tides --- tidal datums --- VDatum --- spatially varying uncertainty (SVU) --- north-east Gulf of Mexico --- Brown Passage --- Chatham Sound --- internal tides --- circulation --- numerical model --- stratification --- barotropic --- baroclinic --- Hood Canal --- floating bridge --- Salish Sea --- hydrodynamics --- Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM) --- circulation --- anthropogenic impact --- zone of influence --- Salish Sea model --- ice modeling --- operational forecast --- FVCOM --- CICE --- hydrodynamic modeling --- Great Lakes --- hydrodynamic numerical model --- H3D --- agriculture --- salt wedge --- climate change --- sea level rise --- river discharge --- channel deepening --- tidal constituent database --- ADvanced CIRCulation model (ADCIRC) --- Eastern North Pacific Ocean (ENPAC) --- coastal ocean modeling --- Gulf of Mexico --- operational nowcast and forecast system --- Finite Volume Community Ocean Model --- water level --- temperature --- salinity --- water quality --- model calibration --- estuary --- eutrophication --- CE-QUAL-W2 --- phytoplankton --- algal growth kinetics --- wave energy --- wind forcing --- large-wave hindcast --- multi-level nested-grid modeling --- CFSR --- NARR --- WaveWatch III --- SWAN --- hydrodynamics --- feasibility assessments --- nearshore restoration --- FVCOM --- Puget Sound --- Salish Sea --- numerical model --- sediment transport --- marine --- short-lived radioisotopes --- wave hindcast --- breakwater --- harbor --- estuary --- SWAN --- MIKE21SW --- unstructured grid --- storm surge --- coastal storm --- flooding --- compound events --- estuarine modeling --- lateral circulation --- tidal currents --- momentum balance --- coastal and estuarine modeling --- ADCIRC --- water level time series --- VDatum --- tidal datums --- statistical interpolation --- spatially varying uncertainty --- non-tidal zones --- marine grid population --- Texas --- western Louisiana --- Gulf of Mexico --- ocean modeling --- cloud computing --- data analysis --- geospatial data visualization

Google Earth Engine Applications

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ISBN: 9783038978848 9783038978855 Year: Pages: 420 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-885-5 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Technology (General) --- Environmental Technology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-04-25 16:37:17
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In a rapidly changing world, there is an ever-increasing need to monitor the Earth&rsquo;s resources and manage it sustainably for future generations. Earth observation from satellites is critical to provide information required for informed and timely decision making in this regard. Satellite-based earth observation has advanced rapidly over the last 50 years, and there is a plethora of satellite sensors imaging the Earth at finer spatial and spectral resolutions as well as high temporal resolutions. The amount of data available for any single location on the Earth is now at the petabyte-scale. An ever-increasing capacity and computing power is needed to handle such large datasets. The Google Earth Engine (GEE) is a cloud-based computing platform that was established by Google to support such data processing. This facility allows for the storage, processing and analysis of spatial data using centralized high-power computing resources, allowing scientists, researchers, hobbyists and anyone else interested in such fields to mine this data and understand the changes occurring on the Earth&rsquo;s surface. This book presents research that applies the Google Earth Engine in mining, storing, retrieving and processing spatial data for a variety of applications that include vegetation monitoring, cropland mapping, ecosystem assessment, and gross primary productivity, among others. Datasets used range from coarse spatial resolution data, such as MODIS, to medium resolution datasets (Worldview -2), and the studies cover the entire globe at varying spatial and temporal scales.

Keywords

Google Earth Engine --- NDVI --- vegetation index --- Landsat --- remote sensing --- phenology --- surface reflectance --- cropland mapping --- cropland areas --- 30-m --- Landsat-8 --- Sentinel-2 --- Random Forest --- Support Vector Machines --- segmentation --- RHSeg --- Google Earth Engine --- Africa --- remote sensing --- semi-arid --- ecosystem assessment --- land use change --- image classification --- seasonal vegetation --- carbon cycle --- Google Earth Engine --- crop yield --- gross primary productivity (GPP) --- data fusion --- Landsat --- MODIS --- MODIS --- Random Forest --- pasture mapping --- Brazilian pasturelands dynamics --- Google Earth Engine --- crop classification --- multi-classifier --- cloud computing --- time series --- high spatial resolution --- BACI --- Enhanced Vegetation Index --- Google Earth Engine --- cloud-based geo-processing --- satellite-derived bathymetry --- image composition --- pseudo-invariant features --- sun glint correction --- empirical --- spatial error --- Google Earth Engine --- low cost in situ --- Sentinel-2 --- Mediterranean --- burn severity --- change detection --- Landsat --- dNBR --- RdNBR --- RBR --- composite burn index (CBI) --- MTBS --- lower mekong basin --- landsat collection --- suspended sediment concentration --- online application --- google earth engine --- Landsat --- Google Earth Engine --- protected area --- forest and land use mapping --- machine learning classification --- China --- temporal compositing --- image time series --- multitemporal analysis --- change detection --- cloud masking --- Landsat-8 --- Google Earth Engine (GEE) --- Google Earth Engine --- LAI --- FVC --- FAPAR --- CWC --- plant traits --- random forests --- PROSAIL --- small-scale mining --- industrial mining --- google engine --- image classification --- land-use cover change --- seagrass --- habitat mapping --- image composition --- machine learning --- support vector machines --- Google Earth Engine --- Sentinel-2 --- Aegean --- Ionian --- global scale --- soil moisture --- Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity --- Soil Moisture Active Passive --- Google Earth Engine --- drought --- cloud computing --- remote sensing --- snow hydrology --- water resources --- Google Earth Engine --- user assessment --- MODIS --- snow cover --- flood --- disaster prevention --- emergency response --- decision making --- Google Earth Engine --- land cover --- deforestation --- Brazilian Amazon --- Bayesian statistics --- BULC-U --- Mato Grosso --- spatial resolution --- Landsat --- GlobCover --- SDG --- surface urban heat island --- Geo Big Data --- Google Earth Engine --- global monitoring service --- Google Earth Engine --- web portal --- satellite imagery --- trends --- earth observation --- wetland --- Google Earth Engine --- Sentinel-1 --- Sentinel-2 --- random forest --- cloud computing --- geo-big data --- cloud computing --- big data analytics --- long term monitoring --- data archival --- early warning systems

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