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Emerging Technologies to Promote and Evaluate Physical Activity

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889192984 Year: Pages: 140 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-298-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Public Health --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-10 11:59:07
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Increasingly, efforts to promote and measure physical activity are achieving greater precision, greater ease of use, and/or greater scope by incorporating emerging technologies. This is significant for physical activity promotion because more precise measurement will allow investigators to better understand where, when, and how physical activity is and is not occurring, thus enabling more effective targeting of particular behavior settings. Emerging technologies associated with the measurement and evaluation of physical activity are noteworthy because: (1) Their ease of use and transferability can greatly increase external validity of measures and findings; (2) Technologies can significantly increase the ability to analyze patterns; (3) They can improve the ongoing, systematic collection and analysis of public health surveillance due to real-time capabilities associated with many emerging technologies; (4) There is a need for research and papers about the cyberinfrastructure required to cope with big data (multiple streams, processing, aggregation, visualization, etc.); and (5) Increasingly blurred boundaries between measurement and intervention activity (e.g., the quantified-self /self-tracking movement) may necessitate a reevaluation of the conventional scientific model for designing and evaluating these sorts of studies. There have been many recent, disparate advances related to this topic. Advances such as crowdsourcing allow for input from large, diverse audiences that can help to identify and improve infrastructure for activity (e.g., large group identification of environmental features that are conducive or inhibiting to physical activity on a national and even global scale). Technologies such as Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and accelerometry are now available in many mobile phones and can be used for identifying and promoting activity and also understanding naturalistically-occurring activity. SenseCam and other personal, visual devices and mobile apps provide person point of view context to physical activity lifestyle and timing. Further, multiple sensor systems are enabling better identification of types of activities (like stair climbing and jumping) that could not previously be identified readily using objective measures like pedometers or accelerometers in isolation. The ability of activity sensors to send data to remote servers allows for the incorporation of online technology (e.g., employing an online social-network as a source of inspiration or accountability to achieve physical activity goals), and websites such as Stickk.com enable individuals to make public contracts visible to other users and also incorporates financial incentives and disincentives in order to promote behaviors including physical activity. In addition, the increasing use of active-gaming (e.g., Wii, XBox Kinect) in homes, schools, and other venues further underscores the growing link between technology and physical activity. Improvements in mathematical models and computer algorithms also allow greater capacity for classifying and evaluating physical activity, improving consistency across research studies. Emerging technologies in the promotion and evaluation of physical activity is a significant area of interest because of its ability to greatly increase the amount and quality of global recorded measurements of PA patterns and its potential to more effectively promote PA. Emerging technologies related to physical activity build on our own and others’ interdisciplinary collaborations in employing technology to address public health challenges. This research area is innovative in that is uses emerging resources including social media, crowdsourcing, and online gaming to better understand patterns of physical activity.

Computers and Games for Mental Health and Well-Being

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889454969 Year: Pages: 311 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-496-9 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Psychiatry --- Public Health
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:42
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Recent years have seen important developments in the computer and game industry, including the emergence of the concept of serious games. It is hypothesized that tools such as games, virtual reality, or applications for smartphones may foster learning, enhance motivation, promote behavioral change, support psychotherapy, favor empowerment, and improve some cognitive functions. Computers and games may create supports for training or help people with cognitive, emotional, or behavioral change. Games take various formats, from board games to informatics to games with interactive rules of play. Similarly, computer tools may vary widely in format, from self-help or assisted computerized training to virtual reality or applications for smartphones. Some tools that may be helpful for mental health were specifically designed for that goal, whereas others were not. Gamification of computer-related products and games with a numeric format tend to reduce the gap between games and computers tools and increase the conceptual synergy in such fields. Games and computer design share an opportunity for creativity and innovation to help create, specifically design, and assess preventive or therapeutic tools. Computers and games share a design conception that allows innovative approaches to overcome barriers of the real world by creating their own rules. Yet, despite the potential interest in such tools to improve treatment of mental disorders and to help prevent them, the field remains understudied and information is under-disseminated in clinical practice. Some studies have shown, however, that there is potential interest and acceptability of tools that support various vehicles, rationales, objectives, and formats. These tools include traditional games (e.g., chess games), popular electronic games, board games, computer-based interventions specifically designed for psychotherapy or cognitive training, virtual reality, apps for smartphones, and so forth. Computers and games may offer a true opportunity to develop, assess, and disseminate new prevention and treatment tools for mental health and well-being. Currently, there is a strong need for state-of-the-art information to answer questions such as the following: Why develop such tools for mental health and well-being? What are the potential additions to traditional treatments? What are the best strategies or formats to improve the possible impact of these tools? Are such tools useful as a first treatment step? What is the potential of a hybrid model of care that combines traditional approaches with games and/or computers as tools? What games and applications have already been designed and studied? What is the evidence from previous studies? How can such tools be successfully designed for mental health and well-being? What is rewarding or attractive for patients in using such treatments? What are the worldwide developments in the field? Are some protocols under development? What are the barriers and challenges related to such developments? How can these tools be assessed, and how can the way that they work, and for whom, be measured? Are the potential benefits of such products specific, or can these additions be attributed to nonspecific factors? What are the users’ views on such tools? What are the possible links between such tools and social networks? Is there a gap between evidence-based results and market development? Are there any quality challenges? What future developments and studies are needed in the field?

Internet and Mobile Phone Addiction. Health and Educational Effects

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ISBN: 9783038976042 Year: Pages: 328 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-605-9 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Psychology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-21 15:50:41
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Internet use-related addiction problems (e.g., Internet addiction, problem mobile phone use, problem gaming, and social networking) have been defined according to the same core element: the addictive symptomatology presented by individuals who excessively and problematically behave using the technology. Online activity is the most important factor in their lives, causing them the loss of control by stress and difficulties in managing at least one aspect of their daily life, affecting users’ wellbeing and health. In 2018, Gaming Disorder was included as a mental disease in the 11th Revision of the International Classification of Diseases by the World Health Organization. In 2013, the American Psychiatric Association requested additional research on Internet Gaming Disorder. The papers contained in this e-Book provide unique and original perspectives on the concept, development, and early detection of the prevention of these health problems. They are diverse in the nature of the problems they deal with, methodologies, populations, cultures, and contain insights and a clear indication of the impact of individual, social, and environmental factors on Internet use-related addiction problems. The e-Book illustrates recent progress in the evolution of research, with great emphasis on gaming and smartphone problems, signaling areas in which research would be useful, even cross-culturally.

Keywords

commuting --- well-being --- personality --- gender --- stress --- Internet addiction --- Internet gaming disorder --- game device usage pattern --- smartphone --- comorbidity --- Internet gaming disorder --- IGD --- emotional regulation --- cognitive reappraisal --- suppression --- depression --- hostility --- internet gaming disorder --- Dickman Impulsivity Inventory-Short Version (DII) --- Brief Self-Control Scale (BSCS) --- Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) --- Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System (BIS/BAS) --- Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5) --- gambling --- video-game addiction --- screen addiction --- immersion --- problematic Internet use --- comorbidity --- cognitive distortion --- problematic smartphone use --- smartphone addiction --- social media --- approaches to learning --- deep approach to learning --- surface approach to learning --- smartphone --- problematic mobile phone use --- convergent design --- focus group --- survey --- internet gaming disorder --- impulsivity --- depression --- interpersonal relationships --- serial mediation --- Internet addiction --- mobile phone addiction --- online social network --- university students --- technological addictions --- behavioral addictions --- CERI --- CERM --- mobile phone dependence --- mobile phone use --- impulsivity --- China --- Internet addiction --- Internet-use disorder --- Internet literacy --- expectancies --- personality --- cultural differences --- pathological video-game use --- Internet Gaming Disorder --- comorbid psychopathology --- review --- Internet Use Disorder --- prevalence --- epidemiology --- adolescence --- latent profile analysis --- anxiety --- depression --- Internet addiction --- smartphone addiction --- propensity score --- Internet addiction --- coping strategies --- personality traits --- young people --- mobile phone use --- smartphone use --- Problematic Mobile Phone Use --- Problematic Mobile Phone Use Questionnaire --- psychometric testing --- measurement invariance --- time --- gaming disorder --- interpersonal relations --- self-efficacy --- self-control --- expectations --- fear of missing out (FOMO) --- social media --- problematic social media use (PSMU) --- phubbing --- teenagers --- adolescents --- addiction --- internet addiction --- mobile phone (or smartphone) use --- young children --- early childhood education --- parenting --- emergent bilinguals --- intergenerational language transmission --- behavioural addictions --- generalised versus specific problem Internet uses --- Internet addiction --- gaming disorder --- social networking --- mixed methods research

Mobile Learning

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ISBN: 9783038976608 Year: Pages: 86 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-661-5 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Education --- Social Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-04-05 10:34:31
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Mobile learning has become one of the more influential aspects of the field of educational technology, given the ubiquity of modern mobile devices and proliferation of educational applications or ‘apps’. Within this volume, there are a range of studies and reviews which cover a breadth of current topics in the field, namely user motivations for using mobile learning, issues in evaluation, as well as domain-specific considerations (e.g., use within language learning or audio-based applications). Together, these studies represent the synthesis of a range of methods, approaches, and applications that highlight benefits and areas of future growth of mobile technologies and how they can be useful and most effective in education.

Innovation Issues in Water, Agriculture and Food

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ISBN: 9783039211654 / 9783039211661 Year: Pages: 406 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-166-1 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Agriculture (General) --- Environmental Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-08-28 11:21:27
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In a worldwide context of ever-growing competition for water and land, climate change, droughts and man-made water scarcity, and less-participatory water governance, agriculture faces the great challenge of producing enough food for a continually increasing population. In this line, this book provides a broad overview of innovation issues in the complex water–agriculture–food nexus, thus also relative to their interconnections and dependences. Issues refer to different spatial scales, from the field or the farm to the irrigation system or the river basin. Multidisciplinary approaches are used when analyzing the relationships between water, agriculture, and food security. The covered issues are quite diverse and include: innovation in crop evapotranspiration, crop coefficients and modeling; updates in research relative to crop water use and saving; irrigation scheduling and systems design; simulation models to support water and agricultural decisions; issues to cope with water scarcity and climate change; advances in water resource quality and sustainable uses; new tools for mapping and use of remote sensing information; and fostering a participative and inclusive governance of water for food security and population welfare. This book brings together a variety of contributions by leading international experts, professionals, and scholars in those diverse fields. It represents a major synthesis and state-of-the-art on various subjects, thus providing a valuable and updated resource for all researchers, professionals, policymakers, and post-graduate students interested in the complex world of the water–agriculture–food nexus.

Keywords

drought classes --- Standardized Precipitation and Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) --- Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) --- North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) --- log-linear modeling --- persistence --- surface irrigation modelling --- precise land levelling --- irrigation systems design --- beneficial water use --- decision support systems (DSS) --- inflow rates --- cut-off time --- crop water requirements --- latent heat flux --- remote sensing --- olive orchard --- spatial variability --- agriculture --- impact --- measures --- nitrogen --- Sensitive Zones --- Tagus River Basin --- Vulnerable Zones --- basal crop coefficients --- crop coefficient curves --- crop transpiration --- Kcb from ground cover --- SIMDualKc model --- soil evaporation --- soil moisture --- soil temperature --- soil nutrient --- crop yield --- Corn --- Black soil --- deficit irrigation --- Fiesta grapes --- drip irrigation --- dried on the vine --- sustained deficit irrigation --- regulated deficit irrigation --- water–energy–food nexus --- policy-making --- stakeholder engagement --- fuzzy cognitive maps --- Spain --- Andalusia --- calibration --- irrigation district --- evapotranspiration --- crop growth --- validation --- Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. --- crop transpiration --- soil evaporation --- drip and basin irrigation --- deficit irrigation --- reform --- Participatory Irrigation Management --- Transfer --- water users association --- biomass --- crop transpiration --- direct forcing --- leaf area index --- soil evaporation --- soil temperature --- soil water storage depletion --- root growth --- maize yield --- semi-arid region --- actual evapotranspiration --- Pampa biome --- eddy covariance --- evaporative fraction --- hysteresis loops --- dry drainage system --- water and salt balance --- groundwater --- evaporation --- salinity --- irrigation scheduling --- wheat --- soil water balance --- new technologies --- smartphone application --- reference evapotranspiration --- local advection --- aridity effects --- satellite observations --- Evapotranspiration --- Irrigation --- Density coefficient --- Dual crop coefficients --- Row crops --- water and land management --- water users’ organization --- water balance --- supply–demand balance model --- organizational analysis --- participatory management --- pressurized irrigation systems --- on-demand operation --- perturbation --- unsteady flow --- hydrant risk indicator --- relative pressure exceedance --- agricultural intensification --- DPSIR --- nitrogen --- pressures --- policies --- surface water pollution --- water-agriculture-food nexus --- crop water use and evapotranspiration --- irrigation scheduling --- design of irrigation systems --- simulation models --- droughts --- irrigation water governance --- economic and environmental issues

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