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Workers Leaving the Studio: Looking Away from Socialist Realism

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ISBN: 9780692480410 Year: Pages: 210 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0115.1.00 Language: Albanian
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Arts in general
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:38
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Workers Leaving the Studio. Looking Away from Socialist Realism. catalogs the exhibition “Workers leaving the studio. Looking away from socialist realism.,” curated by Mihnea Mircan in the National Gallery of Arts in Tirana, Albania in 2015. According to Mircan, “The […] exhibition reflects on another projection machine, whose history and consequences, unlike cinema, are circumscribed by national boundaries, specific histories, and ideological configurations. The regime of production and representation of socialist realism radicalizes the violence that the creation of a new image does to its subject: it intensifies the fraught relation between refashioned representation and that which is represented. Its insistence on a particular, projective notion of reality is commensurate with the coercion of daily — cultural, social, emotional — life into a grid whose perspective lines and vanishing points carry heavy ideological charges. It enforces what it represents onto that which it represents, so that representation would replace reality.” Apart from a full documentation of the exhibition by photographer Marco Mazzi, the catalogue also features theoretical and art-historical contributions, both in English and in Albanian, on socialist realist art as developed in Albania under the communist regime, as well as texts highlighting contemporary attempts to display political realities through progressive artistic practices. Artists include: Santiago Sierra, Jonas Staal, Ciprian Mureşan, Irwin, Sarah Vanagt, and Armando Lulaj, with scholarly contributions by

Revolutionary Acts

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ISBN: 9781501707209 Year: Pages: 264 Language: English
Publisher: Cornell University Press
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2016-10-26 08:56:43
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During the Russian Revolution and Civil War, amateur theater groups sprang up in cities across the country. Workers, peasants, students, soldiers, and sailors provided entertainment ranging from improvisations to gymnastics and from propaganda sketches to the plays of Chekhov. In Revolutionary Acts, Lynn Mally reconstructs the history of the amateur stage in Soviet Russia from 1917 to the height of the Stalinist purges. Her book illustrates in fascinating detail how Soviet culture was transformed during the new regime's first two decades in power.

Of all the arts, theater had a special appeal for mass audiences in Russia, and with the coming of the revolution it took on an important role in the dissemination of the new socialist culture. Mally's analysis of amateur theater as a space where performers, their audiences, and the political authorities came into contact enables her to explore whether this culture emerged spontaneously ""from below"" or was imposed by the revolutionary elite. She shows that by the late 1920s, Soviet leaders had come to distrust the initiatives of the lower classes, and the amateur theaters fell increasingly under the guidance of artistic professionals. Within a few years, state agencies intervened to homogenize repertoire and performance style, and with the institutionalization of Socialist Realist principles, only those works in a unified Soviet canon were presented.

The Revival of the Russian Literary Avantgarde

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Book Series: Slavistische Beitraege ISBN: 9783876907994 Year: Pages: 206 DOI: 10.3726/b12669 Language: English
Publisher: Peter Lang International Academic Publishing Group
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:31:34
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This study is devoted to the authors who initiated the revival of the Russian avantgarde tradition, which had been brutally suppressed by the Soviet authorities in the mid- 1930s. The revival of this tradition took place in the literary underground, where writers who endeavored to fulfil this challenging task largely remained until the collapse of the Soviet regime. Most of them emerged from obscurity only at the beginning of the 1990s, which explains why their dramatic and fascinating history has been so little examined by scholars. Although the situation has changed significantly in the last decade, during which some insightful studies have appeared in both Russia and the West, the subject obviously requires more thorough and systematic exploration. This book aims to narrow important gaps in the scholarship on the Russian literary avantgarde during its least investigated period.

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