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Liver Myofibroblasts

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889199891 Year: Pages: 99 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-989-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Physiology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Myofibroblasts (MFB) are found in most tissues of the body. They have the matrix-producing functions of fibroblasts and contractile properties that are known from smooth muscle cells. Fundamental work of the last decades has shed remarkable light on their origin, biological functions and role in disease. During hepatic injury, they fulfill manifold functions in connective tissue remodeling and wound healing, but overshooting activity of MFB on the other side induces fibrosis and cirrhosis. The present e-book "Liver myofibroblasts" contains 9 articles providing comprehensive information on "hot topics" of MFB. In our opening editorial we provide a short overview of the origin of MFB and their relevance in extracellular matrix formation which is the hallmark of hepatic fibrosis. Thereafter, leading experts in the field share their current perspectives on special topics of (i) MFB in development and disease, ii) their role in hepatic fibrogenesis, and (iii) promising therapies and targets that are suitable to interfere with hepatic fibrosis.

Risk Factors for Pancreatic Cancer: Underlying Mechanisms and Potential Targets

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194681 Year: Pages: 115 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-468-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Physiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-03-10 08:14:32
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Pancreatic Cancer has been and still is one of the deadliest types of human malignancies. The annual mortality rates almost equal incidence rates making this disease virtually universally fatal. The 5-year survival of patients with pancreatic cancer is a dismal 5% or less. Therapeutic strategies are extremely limited with gemcitabine extending the survival by a disappointing few weeks. The failure of several randomized clinical trials in the past decade investigating the therapeutic efficacy of different mono- and combination therapies reflects our limited knowledge of pancreatic cancer biology. In addition, biomarkers for early detection are sorely missing. Several pancreatic cancer risk factors have been identified. Unfortunately, the underlying mechanisms linking these risk factors to cancer development are poorly understood. Well known possible and probable risk factors for the development of pancreatic cancer are age, smoking, chronic pancreatitis, obesity, and type-2 diabetes mellitus. Age is certainly of the most important risk factors as most cases of pancreatic cancer occur in the elderly population. Smoking ten cigarettes a day increases the risk by 2.6 times and smoking a pack per day increases it by 5 folds. Chronic pancreatitis increases the risk of pancreatic cancer by up to 13 times. Patients with hereditary forms of chronic pancreatitis have an even higher risk. Obesity, a growing global health problem, increases the risk of pancreatic cancer by about 1.5 fold. Type-2 diabetes mellitus is also associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer by at least two-fold. The more recent the onset of diabetes, the stronger the correlation with pancreatic cancer is. In addition, heavy alcohol drinking, a family history of the disease, male gender and African American ethnicity are other risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer is characterized by several genetic alterations including mutations in the Kras proto-oncogene and mutations in the tumor suppressor genes p53 and p16. While Kras mutations are currently thought as early events present in a certain percentage of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs), known precursor lesions of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, mutations in tumor suppressor genes, e.g. p53, seem to accumulate later during progression. In addition, several intracellular signaling pathways are amplified or enhanced, including the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling modules. Overall, these genetic alterations lead to enhanced and sustained proliferation, resistance to cell death, invasive and metastatic potential, and angiogenesis, all hallmarks of cancers. The scope of this Research Topic is to collect data and knowledge of how risk factors increase the risk of initiation/progression of pancreatic cancer. Of particular interest are potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and driving signaling pathways will ultimately allow the development of targeted interventions to disrupt the risk factor-induced cancer development. This Research Topic is interested in a broad range of risk factors, including genetic and environmental, and welcomes original papers, mini and full reviews, and hypothesis papers. Manuscripts that address the effect of combination of risk factors on pancreatic cancer development and progression are of great interest as well.

Recent advances in Pancreatology

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889193332 Year: Pages: 69 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-333-2 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Nutrition and Food Sciences --- Medicine (General) --- Physiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-03-10 08:14:32
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Pancreatic diseases include intractable ones including acute and chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer. In recent years, great advances have been made in the field of pancreatology, including the pathogenesis, diagnostic modalities, and development of novel therapeutic interventions. It has been established that pancreatic stellate cells play a pivotal role in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis as well as in pancreatic cancer known as desmoplastic reaction. Although it might be still controversial, accumulating evidence has shown that interaction between pancreatic stellate cells-cancer cells contribute to the progression of pancreatic cancer through the increased proliferation and migration, and production of cytokines and extracellular matrix components. In addition, pancreatic stellate cells lead to the resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Pancreatic stellate cells attract the researchers as a novel therapeutic target of pancreatic cancer. Genetic studies have shown that mutations in the trypsin-related genes such as cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene and the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) gene are associated with pancreatitis. In general, each of these factors appears to limit trypsin activation or enhance inactivation, and is believed to increase intrapancreatic trypsin activity and predispose to pancreatitis when the gene is mutated. These results have supported a concept that pancreatic protease/anti-protease plays pivotal roles in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. In addition, genetic studies focusing on phenotypic variances would provide us with important information how genetic variants would affect the phenotypic variances. Autophagy is an intracellular bulk degradation system in which cytoplasmic components are directed to the lysosome/vacuole by a membrane-mediated process. Recent studies have highlighted a role of autophagy in acute pancreatitis. Using a conditional knockout mouse that lacks the autophagy-related (Atg) gene Atg5 in the pancreatic acinar cells, autophagy exerts a detrimental effect in pancreatic acinar cells by activation of trypsinogen to trypsin. A theory in which autophagy accelerates trypsinogen activation by lysosomal hydrolases under acidic conditions, thus triggering acute pancreatitis in its early stage. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition is a developmental process that allows a polarized epithelial cell to undergo multiple biochemical changes that enable it to assume a mesenchymal phenotype. The phenotype associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition includes enhanced migratory capacity, invasiveness, elevated resistance to apoptosis, and greatly increased production of extracellular matrix components. In addition to its role in development, tissue regeneration, and fibrosis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition is now considered as a critical process in cancer progression. Induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in cancer cells results in the acquisition of invasive and metastatic properties. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition could be an important mechanism in the progression of pancreatic cancer and its poor prognosis. Autoimmune pancreatitis is a unique form of pancreatitis in which autoimmune mechanisms are suspected to be involved in the pathogenesis. There is accumulating study to deal with this new disease concept. In addition to these topics, we have selected several topics in pancreatology, focusing on recent studies increasingly deepening our knowledge in both basic and clinical researches.

Development and Application of Herbal Medicine from Marine Origin

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ISBN: 9783039212217 / 9783039212224 Year: Pages: 140 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-222-4 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-08-28 11:21:27
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Marine herbal medicine generally refers to the use of marine plants as original materials to develop crude drugs, or for other medical purposes. The term ‘marine plants’ usually denotes macroalgae grown between intertidal and subintertidal zones, including Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta, and Rhodophyta. Considerable progress has been made in the field of biomedical research into marine microalgae and microorganisms in the past decade. As the most important source of fundamental products in the world, marine plants have a very important role in biomedical research. Furthermore, worldwide studies have consistently demonstrated that many crude drugs derived from marine plants contain novel ingredients that may benefit health or can be used in the treatment of diseases; some have been developed into health foods, and some even into drugs. It is expected that there are many substances of marine plant origin that will have medical applications in terms of improving human health and are awaiting discovery.In this Special Issue, entitled “Development and Application of Herbal Medicine of Marine Origin”, we will provide a platform for researchers to publish biomedical studies on substances of marine plant origin. We welcome submissions from scientists and academics from across the world.

Links between Fibrogenesis and Cancer: Mechanistic and Therapeutic Challenges: Mechanistic and Therapeutic Challenges

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ISBN: 9783039217069 / 9783039217076 Year: Pages: 348 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-707-6 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Internal medicine
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:16
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Tissue fibrosis may occur for unknown causes or be the consequence of many pathological conditions including chronic inflammatory or infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders, graft rejection, or malignancy. On the other hand, malignant tumors have been identified in fibrotic tissues decades ago, and now accumulating evidence suggests that fibrotic lesions enhance the risk of cancer in several organs such as liver, lungs, and breast. Disruption of an organ parenchymal cells and of its normal structural scaffold during tissue fibrogenesis appears to induce loss of cell polarity, promoting uncontrolled cell proliferation that may eventually lead to cancer development. Many cellular and molecular abnormalities including aberrant expression of microRNAs, genetic and epigenetic alterations, evasion or delayed apoptosis, unregulated intracellular signal pathways, and dysregulation or defective intercellular communications have been proposed to explain this link between fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis. However, the precise mechanisms of this fibrosis-to-cancer transition remain unclear. This book presents a collection of reviews and original articles summarizing recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms of cancer development in fibrotic organs.

Keywords

lung cancer --- renal injury --- fibrosis --- crizotinib --- anaplastic lymphoma kinase --- cystic formation --- pulmonary fibrosis --- butylidenephthalide --- SOX2 --- type I collagen --- bleomycin --- YAP --- TAZ --- Hippo pathway --- fibrosis --- cancer --- mechanotransduction --- TGF-? --- Wnt --- uterine fibroid --- leiomyoma --- tumor --- tumor necrosis factor ? --- cytokine --- growth factor --- inflammation --- clinical symptoms --- pathophysiology --- therapy --- hepatocellular carcinoma --- cirrhosis --- regeneration --- inflammation --- cytokines --- genetic instability --- reactive oxygen species --- idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) --- lung cancer (LC) --- non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) --- acute lung injury --- protein S --- apoptosis --- signal pathway --- Erk1/2 --- lipopolysaccharide --- uterine fibroid --- leiomyoma --- smooth muscle tumor of uncertain malignant potential --- leiomyosarcoma --- myometrium --- immunohistochemistry --- marker --- pathology --- tumor --- diagnosis --- cancer-associated fibroblasts --- tumor microenvironment --- nanoparticles --- breast cancer --- antitumor efficacy --- cirrhosis --- HBV --- HCV --- hepatocellular carcinoma --- idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis --- lung cancer --- pathogenesis --- common pathways --- hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) --- fibrosis --- cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) --- hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) --- tumor microenvironment --- hepatocellular carcinoma --- non-alcoholic steatohepatitis --- fibrosis --- hepatic stellate cells --- extracellular matrix --- carcinogenesis --- angiogenesis --- cancer-associated fibroblasts --- extracellular matrix --- fibrosis --- heterogeneity --- interstitial fluid pressure --- metabolic reprogramming --- transforming growth factor-? --- tumor stiffness --- GPR40 --- GPR120 --- DHA --- omega-3 fatty acid --- SREBP-1 --- hepatocytes --- EMT --- lncRNA --- metastasis --- miRNA --- SMAD --- TGF-? --- targeted therapy --- tumor microenvironment --- n/a

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