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And Another Thing: Nonanthropocentrism and Art

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ISBN: 9780692652664 Year: Pages: 86 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0144.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Philosophy
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:35
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n And Another Thing: Nonanthropocentrism and Art, Katherine Behar and Emmy Mikelson explore how artists engage with nonanthropocentrism, one of the primary tenets shared by recent speculative realist and new materialist philosophies. Extending their investigations in And Another Thing, an exhibition which the authors curated in 2011, this volume documents both that exhibition and expands on two of its curatorial aims: prioritizing art historical contexts for contemporary philosophy (rather than the other way around), and apprehending artworks as historically specific objects of philosophy. The book is organized in three sections. In the first section, Behar and Mikelson provide long-form essays that chart the evolution of nonanthropocentrism and art, spanning eighteenth-century architectural drawing, performance, minimalist sculpture, and contemporary postminimalism. These essays raise the stakes for art and speculative realism, showing how artists have figured and prefigured nonanthropocentric ideas strikingly similar to those expounded in various “new” realist, materialist, and speculativist philosophies. Literally occupying the center of the volume, in section two, the exhibition is represented by full-color plates of eleven works by Carl Andre, Laura Carton, Valie Export, Regina José Galindo, Tom Kotik, Mary Lucking, Bruce Nauman, Grit Ruhland, Anthony Titus, Ruslan Trusewych, and Zimoun. Artworks by these emerging and canonical figures lay bare the networks of alliances underlying the exhibition. The book concludes with three short meditations on the relation between nonanthropocentrism and art, and what that relation might portend for future thought. These essays, by Bill Brown, Patricia Ticineto Clough, and Robert Jackson, are speculative in the sense that they perceive potentials for theory arising from nonanthropocentrism’s manifestations in art.

Other Grounds: Breaking Free of the Correlationist Circle

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ISBN: 9780692715185 Year: Pages: 164 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0151.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Philosophy
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:35
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Is it possible to get outside your assumptions and know the world for what it is? As the 20th century came to a close, the verdict seemed to be a resounding “no,” but in recent years a renaissance in speculative thought has sparked new lines of inquiry into de-centering the human. Other Grounds enters this conversation with a decidedly lively voice and an ambitious project to match. Not only can we believe in a reality uncolored by our imaginations, says Lindsay, we can also experience it. Closely argued yet expansive in its reach, Other Grounds is built on the premise that we are by our very nature de-centered – that more than one agent is at work in the human body, and that this plurality can serve as a gateway to the experience of otherness in general. Leading the reader with a steady hand through the literature on coincident entities, set theory and the kinesthetic work of F.M. Alexander, Lindsay makes the case for the possibility of objects interceding on us from their own grounds. The result is that rare specimen in the annals of critical thought: a book that is as reasoned as it is readable, as sage as it is sardonic, and unmistakably original throughout.

Animal, Vegetable, Mineral: Ethics and Objects

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ISBN: 9780615625355 Year: Pages: 295 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0006.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Social Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:46
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Animal, Mineral, Vegetable examines what happens when we cease to assume that only humans exert agency. Through a careful examination of medieval, early modern and contemporary lifeworlds, these essays collectively argue against ecological anthropocentricity. Sheep, wolves, camels, flowers, chairs, magnets, landscapes, refuse and gems are more than mere objects. They act; they withdraw; they make demands; they connect within lively networks that might foster a new humanism, or that might proceed with indifference towards human affairs. Through what ethics do we respond to these activities and forces? To what futures do these creatures and objects invite us, especially when they appear within the texts and cultures of the “distant” past?

Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture

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Book Series: Manchester Medieval Literature and Culture ISBN: 9781526115997 Year: Pages: 248 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_631090 Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press Grant: University Of Manchester
Subject: Languages and Literatures --- Arts in general
Added to DOAB on : 2017-06-24 11:02:00
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"Anglo-Saxon ‘things’ could talk. Nonhuman voices leap out from the Exeter Book Riddles, telling us how they were made or how they behave. The Franks Casket is a box of bone that alludes to its former fate as a whale that swam aground onto the shingle, and the Ruthwell monument is a stone column that speaks as if it were living wood, or a wounded body. In this book, James Paz uncovers the voice and agency that these nonhuman things have across Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture. He makes a new contribution to ‘thing theory’ and rethinks conventional divisions between animate human subjects and inanimate nonhuman objects in the early Middle Ages. Anglo-Saxon writers and craftsmen describe artefacts and animals through riddling forms or enigmatic language, balancing an attempt to speak and listen to things with an understanding that these nonhumans often elude, defy and withdraw from us. But the active role that things have in the early medieval world is also linked to the Germanic origins of the word, where a þing is a kind of assembly, with the ability to draw together other elements, creating assemblages in which human and nonhuman forces combine. 

Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture invites us to rethink the concept of voice as a quality that is not simply imposed upon nonhumans but which inheres in their ways of existing and being in the world. It asks us to rethink the concept of agency as arising from within groupings of diverse elements, rather than always emerging from human actors alone."

Archäologische Untersuchungen

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Book Series: Histoire ISBN: 9783839435861 9783837635867 Year: Pages: 246 DOI: 10.14361/9783839435861 Language: German
Publisher: transcript Verlag Grant: Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Förderung der Wissenschaftlichen Forschung
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2017-09-01 11:01:04
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How does time figure in archeology? This volume shows how the past can emerge as history and the reason why a part of human history was temporalized into a Stone Age, Bronze Age, and Iron Age.

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