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The regulation of angiogenesis by tissue cell-macrophage interactions

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889193172 Year: Pages: 113 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-317-2 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Physiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-02-05 17:24:33
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Angiogenesis is the physiological process where new blood vessels grow from existing ones, in order to replenish tissues suffering from inadequate blood supply. Perhaps the most studied angiogenic process occurs in solid tumors whose growing mass and expanding cells create a constant demand for additional supply of oxygen and nutrients for survival. However, other physiological and clinical conditions, such as wound healing, ischemic events, autoimmune and age-related diseases also involve angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is a well-structured process that begins when oxygen and nutrients are depleted, leading to the release of chemokines and growth factors that attract immune cells, particularly macrophages and endothelial cells to the site. Macrophages that are recruited to the site, as well as tissue cells and endothelial cells, secrete pro-angiogenic mediators that affect endothelial cells and promote angiogenesis. These mediators include growth factors such as vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), as well as low levels of mediators that are usually seen as pro-inflammatory but are pro-angiogenic when secreted in low levels (e.g. nitric oxide (NO) and TNFa). Thus, macrophages play a major role in angiogenesis. Macrophages exhibit high plasticity and are capable of shifting between different activation modes and functions according to their changing microenvironment. Small differences in the composition of activating factors (e.g. TLR ligands such as LPS, anti-inflammatory cytokines, ECM molecules) in the microenvironment may differently activate macrophages to yield classically activated macrophages (or M1 macrophages) that can kill pathogen and tumor cells, alternatively activated macrophages (or M2 macrophages) that secrete antiinflammatory cytokines, resolution macrophages (rM?) that are involved in the resolution of inflammation, or regulatory macrophages (e.g. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells - MDSCs) that control the function of other immune cells. In fact, macrophages may be activated in a spectrum of subsets that may differently contribute to angiogenesis, and in particular non-classically activated macrophages such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and Tie2-expressing monocytes (TEMs) can secrete high amounts of pro-angiogenic factors (e.g. VEGF, MMPs) or low levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (e.g. NO or TNFa) resulting in pro-angiogenic effects. Although the importance of macrophages as major contributors and regulators of the angiogenic process is well documented, less is known about the interactions between macrophages and other cell types (e.g. tumor cells, normal epithelial cells, endothelial cells) that regulate angiogenesis. We still have only limited understanding which proteins or complexes mediate these interactions and whether they require cell-cell contact (e.g. through integrins) or soluble factors (e.g. the EGF-CSF-1 loop), which signaling pathways are triggered in each of the two corresponding cell types, and how this leads to secretion of pro- or antiangiogenic factors in the microenvironment. The regulation of such interactions and through them of angiogenesis, whether through post-translational modifications of proteins or via the involvement of microRNA, is still unclear. The goal of this Research Topic is to highlight these interactions and their regulation in the context of both physiological and pathological conditions.

Chemically-Induced DNA Damage, Mutagenesis, and Cancer

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ISBN: 9783038971290 9783038971306 Year: Pages: X, 264 Language: Englisch
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-08-27 13:43:27
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Human cancers frequently arise from exposure to chemicals, although radiation, oxidation, and genetic factors play critical roles as well. DNA damage by these agents in a cell is an important first step in the process of carcinogenesis. DNA repair processes have evolved to repair these damages. However, the replication of damaged DNA may occur frequently prior to repair, resulting in gene mutations and the generation of altered proteins. Mutations in an oncogene, a tumor-suppressor gene, or a gene that controls the cell cycle give rise to a clonal cell population with an advantage in proliferation. The complex process of carcinogenesis includes many such events, but has been generally considered to be comprised of the three main stages known as initiation, promotion, and progression, which ultimately give rise to the induction of human cancer. The articles published in this book entitled “Chemically-Induced DNA Damage, Mutagenesis, and Cancer” provide an overview on the topic of the “consequence of DNA damage” in the context of human cancer with their challenges and highlights.

Cancer Biomarkers and Targets in Digestive Organs

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ISBN: 9783039214631 / 9783039214648 Year: Pages: 146 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-464-8 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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Identification and development of cancer biomarkers and targets have greatly accelerated progress towards precision medicine in oncology. Studies of tumor biology have not only provided insights into the mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis, but also led to discovery of molecules that have been developed into cancer biomarkers and targets. Multi-platforms for molecular characterization of tumors using next-generation genomic sequencing, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and blood-based biopsies have greatly expanded the portfolio of potential biomarkers and targets. These cancer biomarkers have been developed for diagnosis, early detection, prognosis, and prediction of treatment response. The molecular targets have been exploited for anti-cancer therapy and delivery of therapeutic agents. This Special Issue of Biomedicines focuses on recent advances in the discovery, characterization, translation, and clinical application of cancer biomarkers and targets in malignant diseases of the digestive system. The goal is to stimulate basic and translational research and clinical collaboration in this exciting field with the hope of developing strategies for prevention and early detection/diagnosis of cancer in digestive organs, and improving therapeutic and psychosocial outcomes in patients with these malignant diseases.

Keywords

colorectal cancer --- intestinal disorder --- intestinal tumors --- zebrafish --- stereotactic body radiation therapy --- immunotherapy --- biomarkers --- Asian Cancer Research Group (ACRG) --- gastric carcinoma --- molecular profiling --- precision therapy --- pembrolizumab --- predictive biomarkers --- ramucirumab --- The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) --- therapeutic targets --- trastuzumab --- biliary tract carcinoma --- chemotherapy --- clinical trial --- colorectal carcinoma --- gastric carcinoma --- gastrointestinal oncology --- hepatocellular carcinoma --- immunotherapy --- pancreatic carcinoma --- targeted therapy --- Liver transplantation --- liver graft injury --- intragraft gene expression profiles --- cell adhesion molecules --- CD274 --- HFE --- hepatocellular carcinoma --- immunohistochemistry --- molecular profiling --- next-generation sequencing --- precision medicine --- predictive biomarkers --- gastrointestinal oncology --- pancreatic carcinoma --- hepatocellular carcinoma --- biliary tract carcinoma --- gastric carcinoma --- colorectal carcinoma --- stereotactic body radiation therapy --- liver transplant --- targeted therapy --- psychosocial support --- G protein–coupled receptors --- cholecystokinin --- gastrin --- gastrin-releasing peptide --- bombesin --- neurokinin --- neurotensin --- somatostatin --- circulating tumor cells --- colorectal carcinoma --- CAM invasion assay --- phenotypic mosaics --- tumor progenitor --- biomarker --- gastrointestinal malignancies --- immunotherapy --- n/a

Towards New Promising Discoveries for Lung Cancer Patients: A Selection of Papers from the First Joint Meeting on Lung Cancer of the FHU OncoAge (Nice, France) and the MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX, USA)

Authors: --- ---
ISBN: 9783039214518 / 9783039214525 Year: Pages: 230 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-452-5 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Oncology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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This Special Issue of Cancers (Basel) is mainly dedicated to selecting papers from the talks given during the first Joint Meeting on Lung Cancer (JMLC) between the MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, Texas USA) and the Hospital University Federation (HUF) OncoAge (University Côte d’Azur, Nice, France) (Nice, September 2018). The central theme of JMLC is to discuss new advances and exchange ideas regarding lung cancer. Notably, the talks covered different topics on new therapeutic strategies (targeted therapy and immuno-oncology), molecular and cellular biology, biomarkers, and the epidemiology of lung cancer. Special attention was also given to lung cancer in elderly patients. The articles published in this Special Issue covered subjects such as the assessment of new biomarkers and new approaches for the early detection of lung cancer, epidemiological data, and emphasized a place for the newly characterized cellular pathways in lung cancer, which opens room for therapeutic perspectives for lung cancer patients.

Dual Specificity Phosphatases: From Molecular Mechanisms to Biological Function

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ISBN: 9783039216888 / 9783039216895 Year: Pages: 240 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-689-5 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:16
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Dual specificity phosphatases (DUSPs) constitute a heterogeneous group of protein tyrosine phosphatases with the ability to dephosphorylate Ser/Thr and Tyr residues from proteins, as well as from other non-proteinaceous substrates including signaling lipids. DUSPs include, among others, MAP kinase (MAPK) phosphatases (MKPs) and small-size atypical DUSPs. MKPs are enzymes specialized in regulating the activity and subcellular location of MAPKs, whereas the function of small-size atypical DUSPs seems to be more diverse. DUSPs have emerged as key players in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, stress response, and apoptosis. DUSPs regulate essential physiological processes, including immunity, neurobiology and metabolic homeostasis, and have been implicated in tumorigenesis, pathological inflammation and metabolic disorders. Accordingly, alterations in the expression or function of MKPs and small-size atypical DUSPs have consequences essential to human disease, making these enzymes potential biological markers and therapeutic targets. This Special Issue covers recent advances in the molecular mechanisms and biological functions of MKPs and small-size atypical DUSPs, and their relevance in human disease.

Pheochromocytoma (PHEO) and Paraganglioma (PGL)

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ISBN: 9783039216543 / 9783039216550 Year: Pages: 380 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-655-0 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:16
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This book outlines some new advances in genetics, clinical evaluation, localization, therapy (newly including immunotherapy) of pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma including their metastatic counterparts. Well-known and experienced clinicians and scientists contributed to this book to include some novel approaches to these tumors. This book will serve to various health care professionals from different subspecialties, but mainly oncologists, endocrinologists, endocrine surgeons, pediatricians, and radiologists. This book shows that the field of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma is evolving and a significant progress has been made in last 5 years requiring that health care professionals and scientists will learns new information and implement it in their clinical practice or scientific work, respectively. This book should not be missed by anybody who is focusing on neuroendocrine tumors, their newest evaluation and treatment.

Keywords

pheochromocytoma --- paraganglioma --- adrenocortical carcinoma --- adrenal tumor --- pan-cancer analysis --- neural crest --- neuroendocrine --- paraganglioma --- head and neck --- radiotherapy --- 18F-FDOPA --- PET --- GTV --- SDHB --- SDHD --- mortality --- paraganglioma --- pheochromocytoma --- radiofrequency ablation --- cryoablation --- percutaneous ethanol injection --- neuroendocrine tumor --- minimally invasive procedure --- percutaneous ablation --- PASS --- GAPP --- histology --- meta-analysis --- paraganglioma --- pheochromocytoma --- carotid body --- angiogenesis --- mitochondria --- neural crest --- neurogenesis --- paraganglioma --- stem-like tumor cells --- vasculogenesis --- xenograft --- pheochromocytoma --- catecholamine --- global longitudinal strain --- speckle-tracking echocardiography --- subclinical systolic dysfunction --- pheochromocytoma --- paraganglioma --- neuroendocrine tumor --- targeted therapy --- therapy resistance --- FGF21 --- pheochromocytoma --- paraganglioma --- diabetes mellitus --- obesity --- energy metabolism --- calorimetry --- chromogranin A --- metanephrines --- pheochromocytoma --- paraganglioma --- hypoxia --- pseudohypoxia --- spheroids --- HIF --- EPAS1 --- catecholamine --- pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma --- phosphorylation tyrosine hydroxylase --- dog --- pheochromocytoma --- paraganglioma --- SDHB --- SDHD --- mutation --- chromosomal alteration --- comparative genomics --- pheochromocytoma --- paraganglioma --- metastatic --- immunotherapy --- innate immunity --- adaptive immunity --- toll-like receptor --- pathogen-associated molecular patterns --- neutrophil --- T cell --- pheochromocytoma --- paraganglioma --- hypertension --- blood pressure variability --- average real variability --- weighted standard deviation --- paraganglioma --- somatostatinoma --- polycythemia --- EPAS1 --- transgenic mice --- erythropoietin --- pheochromocytoma --- paraganglioma --- TCA cycle --- germline mutation --- metastatic OR malignant pheochromocytoma --- paraganglioma --- ectopic secretion --- lL-6 --- normetanephrines --- VHL --- NF1 --- EPAS1 --- hypoxia-inducible factor --- inflammation --- radiosensitization --- succinate dehydrogenase --- mouse pheochromocytoma cells --- immunohistochemistry --- fluorescence imaging --- pheochromocytoma --- paraganglioma --- next-generation sequencing --- sporadic --- hereditary --- CNV detection --- pheochromocytoma --- paraganglioma --- PET-CT --- 11C-hydroxy-ephedrine --- adrenal incidentaloma --- pheochromocytoma --- paraganglioma --- 177Lu-DOTATATE --- peptide receptor radiotherapy --- PRRT --- neuroendocrine tumor --- NET --- PCC --- PGL --- postoperative --- pheochromocytoma --- hypertension --- hypotension --- arrhythmia --- PPGL --- catecholamines --- adrenomedullary function --- n/a

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