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The ventricular-subventricular zone: a source of oligodendrocytes in the adult brain

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889192687 Year: Pages: 104 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-268-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-03 13:02:24
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Abstract

Demyelinating diseases are characterized by an extensive loss of oligodendrocytes and myelin sheaths from axolemma, which commonly result in disability in young adults. To date, there is no effective treatment against these neurological disorders. In the adult brain, there are neural stem cells (NSCs) that reside within a niche denominated ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) in the lateral wall of the cerebral ventricles. NSCs give rise to neurons and oligodendrocytes that help preserve cellular homeostasis. Growing evidence indicates that V-SVZ progenitor cells may represent an endogenous source of oligodendrocytes that can be useful to treat demyelinating diseases. This e-Book collected the most recent evidence regarding the mechanisms that modulate the proliferation, migration, quiescence, cell-fate choices and survival of oligodendrocyte precursors generated in the V-SVZ. Herein, we compiled information about the role of Sonic hedgehog, NMDA receptors, ErbB proteins, hemopressin, erythropoietin, osmolarity and microglia in the oligodendrocyte production. Some chapters also describe the role of oligodendrocyte precursors in the preservation of cellular homeostasis, aging and white matter repair. All these information is presented as novel research findings, short communications, and review articles, which were written by experts in the field of oligodendrocyte generation, myelin production and white matter re-myelination.

Brain Connectivity in Autism

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889192823 Year: Pages: 264 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-282-3 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Neurology
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-10 11:59:06
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Abstract

The brain's ability to process information crucially relies on connectivity. Understanding how the brain processes complex information and how such abilities are disrupted in individuals with neuropsychological disorders will require an improved understanding of brain connectivity. Autism is an intriguingly complex neurodevelopmental disorder with multidimensional symptoms and cognitive characteristics. A biological origin for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) had been proposed even in the earliest published accounts (Kanner, 1943; Asperger, 1944). Despite decades of research, a focal neurobiological marker for autism has been elusive. Nevertheless, disruptions in interregional and functional and anatomical connectivity have been a hallmark of neural functioning in ASD. Theoretical accounts of connectivity perceive ASD as a cognitive and neurobiological disorder associated with altered functioning of integrative circuitry. Neuroimaging studies have reported disruptions in functional connectivity (synchronization of activated brain areas) during cognitive tasks and during task-free resting states. While these insights are valuable, they do not address the time-lagged causality and directionality of such correlations. Despite the general promise of the connectivity account of ASD, inconsistencies and methodological differences among studies call for more thorough investigations. A comprehensive neurological account of ASD should incorporate functional, effective, and anatomical connectivity measures and test the diagnostic utility of such measures. In addition, questions pertaining to how cognitive and behavioral intervention can target connection abnormalities in ASD should be addressed. This research topic of the Frontiers in Human Neuroscience addresses “Brain Connectivity in Autism” primarily from cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging perspectives.

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